Posts

Looking Ahead: Bold Predictions for the Next Decade

Written by Bill Leedham, P. Geo., CESA

As it is the start of the new decade, I’ve dust off my crystal ball and make a few bold predictions for the decade(s) to come.

Sustainability and the ‘Green’ Economy

We have already seen emerging technologies and new industries geared towards sustainability. In a world where finite resources are dwindling, and with increasing pressure for renewable sources of energy, it’s easy to foresee further consumer demands for a more “green” economy. Hopefully this results in more than just advertising buzzwords, but rather a planned and sincere approach to waste reduction, sustainable resource management, and true ‘cradle-to-grave’ responsibility from manufacturer to end consumer for all products.

 New Problems and New Opportunities

The last decade saw an increasing awareness of emerging contaminants such as micro-plastics, PFOS and PFOA. Similar to past generations experiences with their own ‘new’ contaminants such as asbestos and UFFI; I am sure we will encounter as-yet undiscovered sources of contamination. Whether such pollutants will be associated with cobalt mining for lithium battery production, cannabis waste from commercial growers or by-products from cellular agriculture; it’s how we deal with these new pollutants that may set us apart from past pollution legacies – or not. Developing technical solutions to these new problems will also create unique opportunities for the environmental consulting, remediation and waste management industries.

Lingering Legacies

While we will no doubt experience new environmental contamination issues in the future, we must not forget about the existing pollution problems and the legacies they create. As our population grows, we will continue to create more waste and run out of conventional landfill space – which will require an increase in recycling, re-use, waste reduction and diversion, and alternative methods of waste disposal. Plastic pollution in our waterways is a massive problem that must be solved before there are more plastics than fish in the oceans. Reclamation of abandoned ‘orphan’ oil wells, out-of-service mines, and eventual cleanup of depleted oils sands production facilities and shale-oil fracking sites should be planned for and financed today, so they don’t bankrupt our children and grandchildren.

Environmental Activism and Increasing Political Divides

The rise of environmental activists like Greta Thunberg seems to go hand in hand with the increasing divides between the political right and left, and the growing gap between the very wealthy and the very poor. Unfortunately, I think these gaps may widen further unless we can find a reasonable compromise that all sides can accept. In my opinion such balance would represent real sustainability, but I’m not sure that is achievable in this age of hyper-sensitivity and social media-driven ‘fake’ news from all sides. Regardless of your political persuasion or economic strata; I think we all can (and should) agree that common goals like pollution prevention, waste reduction, clean air, safe water, habitat protection, species biodiversity, are all worthy and necessary endeavours. The sooner we stop arguing and start listening to each other, the sooner we can solve some of these problems and promote and maintain a healthy environment and a truly sustainable economy.


About the Author

Bill is the Head Instructor and Course Developer for the Associated Environmental Site Assessors of Canada (www.aesac.ca); and the founder and President of Down 2 Earth Environmental Services Inc. You can contact Bill at [email protected]

What Exactly Is Canada Doing About The Protection Of Our Environment?

Written by Paula Lombardi, Siskinds LLP

The Federal Government is required under the Federal Sustainable Development Act, S.C. 2008, c.33 (“Act1) to provide Canadians with a strategy as directed by the precautionary principle.

The precautionary principle is defined in section 2 of the FSDA, for implementing any thing, action or process to develop, improve and protect our environment of threats of “serious” or “irreversible damage”, regardless of lack of full scientific data, or cost-effective measures to prevent “environmental degradation”.

The FSDA was passed in June of 2008, and as statutorily required, the federal government implemented the first written objectives to Canadians in a report known as the “Federal Sustainable Development Strategy” (FSDS) for the years 2010 to 2013. The Act requires that the FSDS be updated every three (3) years by the Minister of the Environment based on the precautionary principle. The federal government’s fourth and most recent update is entitled “Achieving a Sustainable Future. A Federal Sustainable Development Strategy for Canada 2019 to 2022″ and was released on June 19, 20192 (the “2019-2022 FSDS”). Every Canadian including Indigenous organizations, non-governmental organizations, academics, businesses (large or small) are invited before the end of each reporting period to make comments on the draft report prior to its release. While the 2019-2022 FSDS report is complete, comments on the new report or ideas on implementation of its goals can be made on the federal government’s Commitments Board or by sending an email to [email protected].

As we enter a new decade, the re-elected liberal federal government will be working with Canadians to attain the thirteen (13) sustainable development goals by 2022. These goals include: lowering emissions; developing more green operations; preserving healthy coasts and oceans; growing clean technology; improving infrastructure; improving lakes and rivers; maintaining lands and forests; ensuring healthy wildlife; providing clean drinking water; creating sustainable food; connecting Canadians with nature; and, encouraging sustainable communities to live clean.

The question is whether these development changes really affect each Canadian? The answer is yes.

These development goals can only be achieved and sustained through action by individuals, the business sector and provincial governments. For example, in December of 2017, The Minister of the Environment and Climate Change Canada (“ECCC”) the Honourable Catherine McKeena stated: “Sustained action on Great Lakes restoration is key to the health and economic prosperity of citizens in this important region.”3 The ECCC gave close to $45 million in new funding to the Great Lakes Protection Initiative to take action on identified priorities (i.e. 2017 State of the Great Lakes Report). These priorities included reducing toxic and nuisance algae and harmful pollutants to restore water quality, and improving and protecting its ecosystem.

The creation of the Canada-Ontario Lake Erie Action Plan4 set out 120 actions to help reduce phosphorus entering Lake Erie. The City of Hamilton has contributed $14 million5 to the Randle Reef Sediment Project. Although this immense multi-year initiative remains on budget with the goal to be completed by 2022, it could only remain possible by the FSDA and application of the precautionary principle.

The 2019-2022 FSDS report is a free public document that all Canadians can easily access by downloading from the federal government website or visiting http://www.fsds-sfdd.ca/downloads/FSDS_2019-2022.pdf.

Footnotes

1 https://laws-lois.justice.gc.ca/eng/acts/f-8.6/page-1.html#h-240603

2 http://www.fsds-sfdd.ca/index.html#/en/intro/annexes#tabs

3 https://www.canada.ca/en/environment-climate-change/corporate/transparency/priorities-management/departmental-results-report/2017-2018/results.html#toc3

4 https://www.canada.ca/en/environment-climate-change/services/great-lakes-protection/action-plan-reduce-phosphorus-lake-erie.html#toc4

5 https://www.hamilton.ca/city-initiatives/our-harbour/budgets-and-fast-facts

The content of this article is intended to provide a general guide to the subject matter. Specialist advice should be sought about your specific circumstances.


About the Author

Paula Lombardi is a partner of Siskinds LLP, and practices in the areas of environmental, municipal, regulatory and administrative law. Prior to joining Siskinds, Paula worked as an associate at a Bay Street law firm where her practice focused on occupational health and safety, environmental and regulatory matters.  Paula recently spent two years as in-house counsel for a major privately owned US corporation, whose owner is on the Forbes 500 list, and was responsible for all Canadian legal and business issues relating to the import and export of goods, transportation of hazardous materials, remediation of contaminated sites, construction of large infrastructure projects, regulatory compliance, NAFTA matters, and preparation of environmental assessments in the US and Canada.

 

Using Biosolids to Revegetate Inactive Mine Tailings

Vale Canada (a global mining company with an integrated mine, mill, smelter, and refinery complex in operations Sudbury, Ontario) has been working with Terrapure Environmental (an industrial waste management company) to utilize biosolids on its main tailings area.

For over 100 years, tailings from the milling operation have been deposited in the Copper Cliff Central Tailings impoundment. The facility is still active, but approximately 1,300 hectares are inactive and need reclamation work.

The Big Nickel in Sudbury (Photo Credit: pizzodisevo)

Over the decades, Vale has had some success in revegetation of its tailings area, but there are still large areas of bare or sparsely vegetated tailings, which have led to wind-erosion-management challenges. To control dust, Vale uses agricultural equipment to cover the tailings with straw or hay, as well as a chemical dust suppressant. These practices are costly, and they have to be done continuously to maintain an appropriate cover at all times. In 2012, Vale decided its tailings needed a permanent vegetative cover—not just to suppress dust and reduce erosion, but to improve overall biodiversity. They entered into discussions with Terrapure Organics Solutions (formerly Terratec Environmental) to collaborate on a trial project to apply biosolids on the mine tailings.

In 2012, Vale decided its tailings needed a permanent vegetative cover—not just to suppress dust and reduce erosion, but to improve overall biodiversity. They entered into discussions with Terrapure Organics Solutions (formerly Terratec Environmental) to collaborate on a trial project to apply biosolids on the mine tailings.

The Challenge

The biggest challenge was forging a new path for this type of work. Applying biosolids to mine tailings had never been done before in Ontario. Just to get the right permits and approvals took about two years. Vale Canada and Terrapure worked closely with the Ontario Environment Ministry to ensure standards compliance. Some of this work included helping to determine what those standards should be. Terrapure was able to contribute to these discussions, leveraging decades of expertise in safe biosolids application to agricultural land. Once the Environmental Compliance Approval came in April 2014, the team had to figure out the best application method and proper amount to encourage vegetation, which meant a lot of testing and optimizing.

The Solution

At first, Terrapure mixed biosolids into the surface layer of the tailings. Over time, however, the team learned that applying biosolids to the surface, without mixing, allowed for greater rates of application and coverage at a lower cost.

Terrapure also had to experiment with the right tonnage per hectare. After seeding four trial plots with different amounts of biosolids coverage—20, 40, 60 and 80 dry tonnes/hectare—it was determined that 80 dry tonnes was best for seed germination. At the time, it was the maximum allowable application rate. By the end of 2014, approximately 25 hectares of tailings were amended. Where the biosolids were applied, there were impressive results. Wildlife that had not been seen feeding in the area in years started to return. In 2015, the Ontario Environment Ministry approved an increase in the biosolids application rate to a maximum of 150 dry tonnes/hectare, which was necessary for providing higher organic matter and nutrient levels, and for stabilizing the tailings’ pH levels. This approval also increased the cap on the amount of biosolids that could be delivered to the maximum application rate per hectare. To enhance the program even more, Terrapure and Vale partnered with the City of Greater Sudbury to blend leaf and yard waste with biosolids. By blending these materials, the mixture becomes virtually odourless, its nutrients are more balanced and it allows for a more diverse application.

Glen Watson, Vale’s superintendent of environment, decommissioning and reclamation, surrounded by lush vegetation covering part of the company’s Central Tailings Facility in Sudbury

The Results

As of 2018, Terrapure has successfully covered over 150 hectares of Vale’s tailings with municipal biosolids. Vegetative growth and wildlife are well established on all areas where the team applied organics. Just as importantly, this project has diverted more than 25,000 dry tonnes of valuable biosolids from becoming waste in the landfill. Following the success of the initial trial, the Environment Ministry widened the approval to include all areas of the inactive tailings and a portion of the active tailings. At the current application rate of 150 dry tonnes/hectare, Vale’s central tailings facility could potentially require another 195,000 dry tonnes of biosolids. That’s more than 30 years of biosolids utilization, at an annual rate of 6,000 dry tonnes of material. Needless to say, Vale is very pleased with the results, and the relationship is ongoing. In fact, the Vale team is evaluating other sites in the Sudbury area for this type of remediation, ensuring a long-term, environmentally sustainable rehabilitation program.

Microbial Biotechnology in Environmental Monitoring and Cleanup

A new book on the advances in microbial biotechnology in environmental monitoring and clean-up has just be published by IGI Global.  The book is part of the Advances in Environmental Engineering and Green Technologies Book Series.

In the book, the authors state that pollutants are increasing day by day in the environment due to human interference. Thus, it has become necessary to find solutions to clean up these hazardous pollutants to improve human, animal, and plant health.

Microbial Biotechnology in Environmental Monitoring and Cleanup is a critical scholarly resource that examines the toxic hazardous substances and their impact on the environment. Featuring coverage on a broad range of topics such as pollution of microorganisms, phytoremediation, and bioremediation, this book is geared towards academics, professionals, graduate students, and practitioners interested in emerging techniques for environmental decontamination.

This book is a collection of various eco-friendly technologies which are proposed to under take environmental pollution in a sustainable manner. the role of microbial systems has been taken as a tool for rapid degradation of xenobiotic compounds. Application of microbes as bio-inoculants for quality crop production has been emphasized by some authors. Conventional method of bioremediation using
hyper-accumulator tree species has been given proper weightage. The emerging role of nanotechnology in different fields has been discussed. The contents of book are organized in various sections which deal about microbial biodegradation, phytoremediation and emerging technology of nanocompounds in agriculture sector.

Chapter 18, which covers phytoremedation, acknowledges that environmental pollution with xenobiotics is a global problem and development of inventive remediationtechnologies for the decontamination of impacted sites are therefore of paramount importance.
Phytoremediation capitalizes on plant systems for removal of pollutants from the environment.  Phytoremediation is a low maintenance remediation strategy and less destructive than physical or chemical remediation.  Phytoremediation may occur directly through uptake,translocation into plant shoots and metabolism (phytodegradation) or volatilization (phytovolatilization) or indirectly through plant microbe-contaminant interactions within plant root zones(rhizospheres).  In recent years, researchers have engineered plants with genes that can bestow superior degradation abilities. Thus, phytoremediation can be more explored, demonstrated, and/or implemented for the cleanup of metal contaminants, inorganic pollutants, and organic contaminants.

Topics Covered

The 400-page, 20 chapter book covers many academic areas covered including, but are not limited to:

  • Bio-Fertilizers
  • Bioremediation
  • Microbial Degradation
  • Microorganisms
  • Organic Farming
  • Pesticide Biodegradation
  • Phytoremediation

 

 

Pond Technologies announces project at Markham District Energy

Pond Technologies Holdings Inc. (TSX.V: POND) recently announced the shipment of its proprietary Matrix System to Markham District Energy Inc. (MDE). The shipment marks the commencement of the first phase of a $16.8 Million project to convert CO2 emissions to valuable algae-based nutraceutical products. Pond’s Matrix System optimizes algae strain selection through the analysis of its customer’s emissions.

Pond also announced the signing of an exclusive marketing agreement with MDE who will market and develop customer projects using Pond’s solution for the District Energy market worldwide. District Energy systems are a highly efficient way to provide power, heating and cooling to buildings in communities and campuses from central plants. Bruce Ander, MDE’s President & CEO, is a past Chair of the International District Energy Association that represents over 2,200 members in 26 countries. Energy company for different countries are always developing and changing, trying to find the best energy for their communities. Comparison sites similar to Utility Bidder help to make the choice between energy companies easier for their consumers.

“We are pleased and ready to move this project forward with Pond Technologies. The technology represents a significant opportunity for Markham District Energy to lower our environmental footprint while repurposing greenhouse gas emissions to manufacture a valuable product. As we gain operational experience with the Pond process, we are keen to share our story with our District Energy colleagues here and abroad.” Bruce Ander, President & CEO of Markham District Energy Inc.

Steve Martin, President & CEO of Pond Technologies Inc. commented, “We are very excited to be working with Markham District Energy on this landmark project and grateful for their help in propagating our solution to other District Energy utilities located around the world.”

About Markham District Energy (MDE)
MDE, an energy company owned by the City of Markham, is committed to continuing as a leading developer of municipally owned district energy systems providing strategic foundations for Markham’s Greenprint Sustainability Plan and economic development objectives. MDE owns and operates award-winning community energy systems serving buildings in the developing urban centres of Markham Centre and Cornell Centre.

Markham District Energy is a thermal energy utility owned by the City of Markham

About Pond Technologies:
Located in Markham, Ontario, Pond Technologies Holdings Inc. (Pond) has developed a proprietary growth platform that can transform carbon dioxide (CO2) from virtually any source into valuable bio-products. Pond works with the cement, steel, oil and gas and power generation industries to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and generate new revenue streams.

Pond’s platform technology also includes the growth of algae superfoods for the nutraceutical and food additive markets. Pond’s system is capable of growing many species of algae, including strains that produce anti-oxidants, omega-3 fatty acids, and protein for human and animal consumption.

Algae Carbon Capture system