Incident and Emergency Management Market – Growth, Trends and Forecast (2020 – 2025)

According to the findings in a recent market research report, the incident and emergency management market was valued at USD 97.73 billion in 2020 and is expected to reach USD 137.84 billion by 2025, with a CAGR of 6.03% during the forecast period (2020-2025). Emergency situations are highly unpredictable; it takes intense planning, time, and human resources to recover from crisis situations.

Emergency response systems are a vital component in speeding up the recovery process. Governments are increasingly trying to develop intelligent mitigation plans to minimize the response time and damage caused by both natural and man-made disasters.

Climate change is leading to increased frequency and severity of extreme weather events across regions. Centre for Research on the Epidemiology of Disasters reported that the amount of flood and storm catastrophes have risen by 7.4 % annually, in recent times.

Among end-users, a few, like educational institutions and hospitality firms, have a lower level of awareness and deployment of such software solutions and are mostly into recovery post-incident. Such low adoption rates are likely to affect the market revenues over and during the forecast period.

Scope of the Report

Incident and emergency management refer to a standardized approach, which prevents & manage incidents or humanitarian emergencies that have severe outcomes. It is involved in the integration and deployment of emergency systems and solutions at all government and non-government platforms.

Key Market Trends

Increase in Natural Disasters

As natural disasters increase in frequency and severity, their recovery costs are also significantly increasing year-by-year. Moreover, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), in 2017, the United States had the costliest year ever, when it comes to natural disasters.

The country experienced 16 different events, that resulted in more than a billion dollars in damage each, with a total price tag of USD 306.2 billion. Thus, it is vital that organizations work to save lives, protect property, and build communities back stronger after disaster strikes.

In disaster recovery solutions, it is of paramount importance to have a fast, reliable, and secure form of communication. Communication requirements in a disaster recovery can benefit from the flexibility, versatility, and quick deployment of satellite networks, enabling responders to coordinate first response activities and command, control and communicate urgent information, quickly and efficiently.

Asia-Pacific is the Fastest Growing Region

Asia-Pacific is the fastest growing region, due to the growing disaster management, terrorist and cyber attacks in the region. With enhanced geographical zones and a high client base, the region is expected to exhibit strong growth in the studied market.

The region is the world’s most disaster-prone region, so disaster management is a significant priority. Over the years, most countries in the region have established national disaster management authorities and systems that are increasingly adopting the latest technologies and solutions.

Also due to an increase in the government expenditure on emergency and disaster management systems to safeguard people from disasters, the region has been witnessing a rise in the studied market software.

In April 2018, the Emergency Operations (EMO) unit at WHE/SEARO organized the WHO South-East Asia Regional and Country Offices Emergency Readiness training in India.

Competitive Landscape

The existing players in the market, like IBM, NEC Corporation, and Honeywell among others are well penetrated and possess successful strategies to come up with new and differentiated products that would increase opportunities for them. Additionally, brand identity has a major influence in this market, as strong brands are considered to be synonymous with good performance.

However, with new companies supported and funded, like governments and others(for instance, TMC Technologies), the competition is expected to grow, overall, the competitive rivalry in the market is moderate and increasing. Some of the key players in Incident and Emergency Management Market are Hexagon AB, NEC Corporation.

Some of the key recent development in Incident and Emergency Management Market are as follows:

The Isle of Wight NHS Trust’s Ambulance Service (IoW Ambulance Service) has implemented Hexagon’s intergraph computer-aided dispatch (I/CAD) system. This industry-leading incident management solution will support the island’s emergency and non-emergency call handling and dispatch needs, enhance collaboration with neighboring services, and reduce costs.

NEC Corporation announced the supply of wide-area disaster prevention system to the Meteorological, Climatological and Geophysical Agency of the Republic of Indonesia (Indonesia). This wide-area disaster prevention system will collect seismic intensity and waveform information obtained from seismometers newly installed at 93 sites across Indonesia.

Interim Recommendations for Addressing Groundwater Contamination with PFOA and PFOS

The United States Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) recently released interim recommendations for screening levels and preliminary remediation goals to inform the development of final cleanup levels for PFOA and/or PFOS groundwater contamination at sites being evaluated and addressed under federal cleanup programs, including CERCLA and RCRA.

The recommendations are consistent with existing EPA guidance and standard practices, in addition to applicable statutes and regulations. The recommendations may be useful for state, tribal, or other regulatory authorities.

In a news release, U.S. EPA Administrator Andrew Wheeler stated, “The interim recommendations will provide clear and consistent guidance for federal cleanup programs and will help protect drinking water resources in communities across the country. This is a critical tool for our state, tribal, and local partners to use to protect public health and address these chemicals.”

U.S. Federal agencies and states have asked the U.S. EPA to provide guidance on this issue. After reviewing public comments on the agency’s April 2019 draft guidance, the U.S. EPA is finalizing these interim recommendations based on the available data and scientific information on PFAS toxicity. The U.S. EPA acknowledges that the scientific information on these compounds continues to evolve. As part of the PFAS Action Plan, the U.S. EPA is continuing to develop and assess toxicity information, test methods, laboratory methods, analytical methods, exposure models, and treatment methods, among other research efforts to improve the knowledge about this class of chemicals. As new information becomes available on other PFAS chemicals, the agency will consider additional recommendations as the agency advances its knowledge of these other substances.

Veolia Steps up Hazardous Waste Business In North America

Veolia, through its subsidiary Veolia North America, recently announced that it has signed an agreement to take over Alcoa USA Corporation’s Hazardous Waste Treatment Site located in Gum Springs, Arkansas (USA). With this operation, Veolia continues the global expansion of its hazardous waste treatment and recycling activity, with a step further in North America, and adds a flagship site to its existing portfolio.

The facility, located on a 1,350 acre site, currently employs 70 people. The Gum Springs facility has traditionally treated spent pot liner, a hazardous waste byproduct of the aluminum production process, for the North American smelter industry. As part of its global growth strategy in difficult-to-treat pollutants, Veolia will be looking at expanding the type of waste, as well as volume, handled at the site, as it is already permitted for the treatment and final disposal of nearly all categories of liquid and solid hazardous waste. While remaining a key service provider to Alcoa through a multi-year dedicated agreement, the facility will also be expanding its services to customers throughout North America.

Veolia treats and recycles around 6 million tons of hazardous waste – over 100.000 industrial, commercial or household clients, and employs 8,000 who operate a comprehensive network of more than 140 facilities on five continents.

In Europe, Veolia operates the two biggest hazardous waste treatment sites of the continent. In North America, Veolia’s hazardous waste operations notably support a number of industries The company notably operates four major incineration facilities on two sites in Texas and Illinois.

This transaction is valued at USD 250 million and closing is expected in the first quarter of 2020.

Source: Veolia

Oil Spill in B.C. contaminates protected waterway

It took  several days to determine the source of an oil spill that contaminated the Gorge Creek in the Township of Esquimalt in British Columbia. It was confirmed by officials that the cause of the spill was a leaking residential heating-oil tank.  Oil from the tank entered both the subsurface and the stormwater system and eventually made its way to Gorge Creek.

Emergency Management BC found the spill on January 18th.  Esquimalt staff investigated potential spill sites in the north neighbourhoods of Esquimalt as well as monitor the creek to deploy booms and absorbing materials.  It took until January 24th to pinpoint the location of the spill.

As frustrations grew on the inability to locate the source of the spill, the number of officials involved in clean-up efforts grew to include federal, provincial, township and Capital Regional District staff.  Marine-spill and hazardous-materials experts were also at the scene, hired by the Township to assist with the cleanup.

Gorge Creek represents a critical part of the Victoria Harbour Migratory Bird Sanctuary that was created in 1923 to curb the hunting of birds. A Capital Regional District report says the sanctuary includes 1,840 hectares of marine and estuarine waters and provides habitat for rare and endangered plants and wildlife.  The impact of the spill on wildlife has yet to be assessed.

The total about of heating oil spilled into the creek and total cost of clean-up has yet to be determined.

 

CCME Publishes Ecological Risk Assessment Guidance Document

The Canadian Council of Ministers of the Environment (CCME) recently posted the latest version of its Ecological Risk Assessment Guidance Document.  The document provides general guidance for site managers and risk assessors to conduct ecological risk assessment for soils, sediments, surface water and groundwater in the context of managing contaminated sites. It expands the Federal Contaminated Sites Action Plan Ecological Risk Assessment Guidance to apply to all jurisdictions and align with CCME’s Framework for Ecological Risk Assessment: General Guidance (1996).

Why conduct an ERA?

Once a site is classified as contaminated, and has contaminant concentrations above existing ecologically based guidelines or levels of potential ecological concern, the site may be remediated to generic standards or an ERA may be used to determine whether and to what extent remediation or other risk management efforts are warranted to mitigate current or future ecological risks. An ERA provides a more detailed basis for determining whether remediation or other risk management measures are warranted (e.g., are there ecological risks?) and to what extent (e.g., which parts of a site should be remediated?).

Using ERA at Contaminated Sites

There are numerous potential drivers for the use of ERA at contaminated sites, such as regulatory triggers (e.g., contamination of an off-site property), due diligence or divestiture. The required ERA process may be driven in part or entirely by provincial or territorial regulations and policy.

About the CCME

The Canadian Council of Ministers of the Environment (CCME) is the primary minister-led intergovernmental forum for collective action on environmental issues of national and international concern.  CCME is composed of the environment ministers from the federal, provincial and territorial governments. The role of President of CCME rotates among the 14 ministers of environment on an annual basis. These 14 ministers normally meet at least once a year to discuss national environmental priorities and determine work to be carried out under the auspices of CCME. The Council seeks to achieve positive environmental results, focusing on issues that are Canada-wide in scope and that require collective attention by a number of governments. Since environment is constitutionally an area of shared jurisdiction, it makes sense to work together to promote effective results.

Canada Environmental Damages Fund – Call for Proposals

The Canadian Environmental Damages Fund (EDF) is a specified purpose account administered by Environment and Climate Change Canada (ECCC) to direct funds received from fines, court orders and voluntary payments to priority projects that will benefit Canada’s natural environment.

ECCC recently issues a call for proposals for funding of projects.  The deadline for submission of proposals is February 18th, 2020.

Groups eligible for funding include non-governmental organizations, universities and academic institutions, Indigenous organizations, and provincial/territorial & municipal governments.  Although private companies are not eligible for funding, they are encouraged to partner with eligible groups to apply for funding.

Eligible Projects

When allocating funds, ECCC gives priority to projects that restore the natural environment and conserve wildlife, followed by environmental quality improvement initiatives, research and development on environmental restoration and improvement, and education and awareness on issues affecting the health of the natural environment.

There is no maximum project duration. The average length of a project is approximately two years.

EDF funding is available for projects that meet the following criteria:

  • address one or more of EDF’s four priority areas noted above
  • satisfy all fund use requirements as listed on the EDF Available Funds page
  • are scientifically sound and technically feasible
  • are cost-effective in achieving goals, objectives and results
  • can measure results using EDF performance indicators
  • show that the environment will benefit from the project
  • demonstrate that the applicant possesses or has access to necessary partnership, experience, knowledge and skills required to undertake the project

While matching funds are not required, evidence of other funding sources such as matching contributions and the respective amounts, or demonstration of the applicant’s ability to raise funds from sources other than the federal government in a past project will be considered as an asset at the proposal evaluation stage.

In addition, your project must include at least one of the EDF’s performance indicators.  The EDF Applicant Guide contains the complete list and explanation of indicators and is available upon logging into the Grants and Contributions Enterprise Management System (GCEMS).

Available funds

Available funding varies according to the number of court awards and voluntary contributions directed to the EDF. In its sentencing decision, the court may recommend the recipient, location and scope of a project funded by the fine. This information is considered in the assessment of the fine and in the definition of the appropriate fund use requirement. Funding is currently available in the following provinces and territories:

British Columbia

Application Deadline:  February 18, 2020
Location: British Columbia
Funds Available: $275,033.06

Fund use requirement: For projects related to the conservation and protection of fish or fish habitat or the restoration of fish habitat in any watershed in the Province of British Columbia with priority for projects in the Bulkley River watershed, Fraser River watershed (Cariboo-Chilcotin Central Region), or the Campbell River watershed, or near the city of Powell River, British Columbia. Minimum funding request is $100,000.

Application Deadline:  February 18, 2020
Location: British Columbia
Funds Available: $90,000

Fund use requirement: For projects aimed at waterfowl, bird and fish habitat conservation and restoration in British Columbia with priority for projects in or around the Fort St. John area, British Columbia. Minimum funding request is $90,000.

Alberta

Application Deadline: February 18, 2020
Location: Alberta
Funds Available: $269,950.17

Fund use requirement: For projects related to the conservation and protection of fish or fish habitat or the restoration of fish habitat in the Province of Alberta, with priority for projects in the North Saskatchewan River watershed. Minimum funding request is $100,000.

Application Deadline: February 18, 2020
Location: Alberta
Funds Available: $35,227.65

Fund use requirement: For projects aimed at managing and/or conserving and protecting fish and/or fish habitat in the Lesser Slave Lake watershed. Minimum funding request is $35,227.65.

Northwest Territories

Application Deadline:  February 18, 2020
Location: Northwest Territories
Funds Available: $32,765.08

Fund use requirement: For projects aimed at protecting, conserving or restoring the environment or promoting the conservation and protection of fish or fish habitat or the restoration of fish habitat in the Northwest Territories with priority for projects within the Yellowknife watershed, Northwest Territories. Minimum funding request is $32,765.08.

Saskatchewan

Application Deadline:  February 18, 2020
Location: Saskatchewan
Funds Available: $40,000

Fund use requirement: For projects aimed at promoting the proper management and control of fisheries or fish habitat or conservation and protection of fish or fish habitat in the Province of Saskatchewan with priority for projects in the Moose Jaw watershed, Saskatchewan. Minimum funding request is $40,000.

Application Deadline:  February 18, 2020
Location: Saskatchewan
Funds Available: $104,000

Fund use requirement: For projects aimed at protecting, conserving or restoring the environment in the Province of Saskatchewan, with priority for projects in the west-northwest region of Saskatchewan. Minimum funding request is $104,000.

Yukon

Application Deadline:  February 18, 2020

Location: Yukon
Funds Available: $20,000

Fund use requirement: For projects aimed at protecting, conserving or restoring the environment in the Yukon Territory with priority for projects near Whitehorse, Yukon. Minimum funding request is $20,000.

Ontario

Application Deadline:  February 18, 2020
Location: Ontario
Funds Available: $75,000

Fund use requirement: For projects aimed at the conservation and protection of fish or fish habitat or the restoration of fish habitat within the municipal boundaries of the City of Kawartha Lakes. Minimum funding request is $75,000.

Québec

Application Deadline: February 18, 2020
Location: Quebec
Funds Available: $404,199

Fund use requirement: For projects aimed at promoting the conservation, protection and restoration of the habitat of Lac Mégantic and the Chaudière River. Minimum funding request is $100,000.

Application Deadline: February 18, 2020
Location: Quebec
Funds Available: $380,000

Fund use requirement: For projects aimed at scientific research, improvement and/or restoration of fish habitat or the conservation and protection of fish or fish habitat in the region of la Capitale-Nationale or the Chaudières-Appalaches. Minimum funding request is $100,000.

Application Deadline: February 18, 2020
Location: Quebec
Funds Available: $1,126,627

Fund use requirement: For projects aimed at promoting the protection, conservation, recovery or restoration of the environment in the Province of Quebec, more specifically in the Montreal region. Minimum funding request is $200,000.

Newfoundland and Labrador

Application Deadline: February 18, 2020

Location: Newfoundland and Labrador
Funds Available: $200,000

Fund use requirement: For projects aimed at protecting, conserving, or restoring the environment in the Province of Newfoundland and Labrador. Preference will be given to projects in coastal locations. Minimum funding request is $100,000.

New Brunswick

Application Deadline: February 18, 2020
Location: New Brunswick
Funds Available: $50,000

Fund use requirement: For projects aimed at promoting the conservation and protection of fish and fish habitat, or the restoration of fish habitat in the Province of New Brunswick. Minimum funding request is $50,000.

Application process

Step 1: Confirm available funds and project eligibility

Review funding opportunities, and confirm funds are available in your project’s location. Review fund use requirements associated with each available fund and ensure your project’s activities satisfy those requirements.

Log into GCEMS to access the EDF Applicant Guide. Refer to the Applicant Guide to ensure all proposed project activities are eligible EDF expenditures. For questions or clarification, please contact an EDF office in your region.

Step 2: Prepare your funding application using GCEMS

Visit the GCEMS application instructions page for technical assistance documents, tutorials, and support throughout your application preparation.

If desired, contact the EDF office in your region prior to the application deadline to discuss your project application with an EDF Program Officer. Officers can also help provide advice/information on:

  • the EDF program
  • the funding process
  • official languages requirements

Step 3: Submit your application

Once you have submitted your application, you will receive an acknowledgment of receipt email confirming successful submission.

Following the project review phase, you will receive notification on the status of your funding application.

Illegal dumping results in $190k remediation in Grande Prairie, Alberta

In May of last year, there was an incident in which hydrocarbon was illegally disposed into a curbside drain that contaminated a popular fishing pond in the County of Grande Prairie, Alberta.  The pond was closed for two months during the clean-up and remediation.  The final bill for the clean-up and remediation was recently tallied at $184,125.

Investigators from Alberta Environment Parks and Recreation (AEP) estimated that approximately five cubic metres (1,320 U.S. gallons) were released into the pond.  Although a determination was made that the release of hydrocarbons was intentional, fines have not been laid and AEP has closed the file.

After the initial response to contain the oil waste and prevent further contamination, the County’s environmental consultants conducted extensive remediation work along the shoreline, including removal of approximately two-thirds of the cattails surrounding the pond.

“The County along with Alberta Environment have been monitoring the wildlife in the area since the incident occurred and there is no known impact to the health of animal or aquatic life,” said Christine Rawlins, parks and recreation manager. “Out of an abundance of caution, however, we will continue to operate the pond on a catch and release basis only.”

In response to the incident, the County has reviewed its own internal processes for environmental emergency response and have made updates to the health and safety management system. Action steps include updating the Standard Operating Procedure, coordinating response through the Incident Command System, and ensuring an up-to-date list of qualified environmental contractors who can respond to similar events. The key is prompt detection and notification that leads to a quick response when these types of events occur.

“We are grateful to the member of the public who reported the sheen in the pond, which alerted us to the fact that there was an illegal dumping of hydrocarbon into a nearby drain,” said Daniel Lemieux, Director of Community Services for the County of Grande Prairie. “Vigilance is an important part of our early detection and mitigation strategy, so we ask that the public contact the Alberta Environment’s 24-hour Emergency Response Line at 1-800-222-6514 or Alberta Environmental and Dangerous Goods Emergencies at 1-800-272-9600 immediately if they see anything unusual, including someone dumping materials into the drains. This incident was costly to the County, the community, and the environment and was entirely preventable.”

 

 

Water company pleads guilty to hazardous waste violations

As reported by the Associated Press, A California-based water company recently pleaded guilty to illegally storing and transporting hazardous waste and agreed to a $5 million fine.  The company produces Crystal Geyser bottled water.

The hazardous waste was generated at the company from the sand filters used to remove arsenic out the spring water at the CG Roxane LLC’s facility in Owens Valley.  When the sand filters were back washed with sodium solution, thousands of gallons of arsenic-contaminated water was generated.  The company entered the pleas to one count of unlawful storage of hazardous waste and one count of unlawful transportation of hazardous material.  The  company was accused of discharging the wastewater into a man-made pond over the course of approximately 15 years.

Pond sampling by local water quality officials in 2013 found arsenic concentrations above the hazardous waste limit, as did subsequent sampling by state authorities and the company.  State officials instructed the company to remove the pond.  The two companies hired to manage the wastewater were not informed the wastwater was considered hazardous material, resulting in 23,000 gallons (87,064 litres) being discharged into a sewer without proper treatment.

 

U.S. Federal Toxmap Website Closes

TOXMAP® is no longer.  Launched an run by the United States National Library of Medicine (NLM) fifteen years ago, the website closed down in December.

ToxMap was a Geographic Information System (GIS) that usedmaps of the United States and Canada to help users visually explore data primarily from the U.S. EPA’s Toxics Release Inventory (TRI) and Superfund Program, as well as some non-EPA datasets. It combined pollution data  from the U.S. EPA and at least a dozen other U.S. government sources.

ToxMap helped users create nationwide, regional, or local area maps showing where TRI chemicals are released on-site into the air, water, and ground. It also provided facility and release details, color-codes release amounts for a single year or year range, and aggregates release data over multiple years. Maps also showed locations of Superfund National Priorities List (NPL) sites, listing all chemical contaminants present at these sites. Two versions of TOXMAP wereavailable: the classic version of TOXMAP released in 2004, and a newer version of TOXMAP based on Adobe® Flash/Flex technology. The newer version provided an improved map appearance and interactive capabilities and additional datasets such as U.S. EPA coal plant emissions data and U.S. commercial nuclear power plants.

ToxMap began in 2004 as a way of culling data that the U.S. EPA collected on toxic releases and conveying it to the public in more accessible and relevant way. Thanks largely to the 1986 Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (EPCRA), the agency had been collecting huge amounts of data on chemicals of concern being released from individual facilities—the Toxic Release Inventory. But until the early 2000s, this vast store of “public” information demanded considerable time and expertise to find and tap, much less to interpret.

The development of ToxMap was part of a broader government push towards data transparency. ToxMap made it much easier to find out about the chemicals a plant in a neighborhood was releasing into the local water or air, or about where the nearest hazardous wastes sites were located.

 

Green Remediation: Spreadsheets for Environmental Footprint Analysis

The United States Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) recently updated a set of analytical workbooks known as “SEFA” (Spreadsheets for Environmental Footprint Analysis) to help decision-makers analyze the environmental footprint of a site cleanup project, determine which cleanup activities drive the footprint, and adjust project parameters to reduce the footprint. Information to be input by the user may be gathered from project planning documents, field records and other existing resources. Automated calculations within SEFA generate outputs that quantify 21 metrics corresponding to core elements of a greener cleanup.

 

Environmental Footprint Summary

Core Element Green Remediation Metric Unit of Measure
Materials & Waste M&W-1 Refined materials used on site tons
M&W-2 Percent of refined materials from recycled or waste material percent
M&W-3 Unrefined materials used on site tons
M&W-4 Percent of unrefined materials from recycled or waste material percent
M&W-5 Onsite hazardous waste generated tons
M&W-6 Onsite non-hazardous waste generated tons
M&W-7 Percent of total potential onsite waste that is recycled or reused percent
Water Onsite water use (by source)
W-1 – Source, use, fate combination #1 millions of gallons
W-2 – Source, use, fate combination #2 millions of gallons
W-3 – Source, use, fate combination #3 millions of gallons
W-4 – Source, use, fate combination #4 millions of gallons
Energy E-1 Total energy use MMBtu
E-2 Total energy voluntarily derived from renewable resources
E-2A – Onsite generation or use and biodiesel use MMBtu
E-2B – Voluntary purchase of renewable electricity MWh
E-2C – Voluntary purchase of RECs MWh
Air A-1 Onsite NOx, SOx, and PM10 emissions lbs
A-2 Onsite HAP emissions lbs
A-3 Total NOx, SOx, and PM10 emissions lbs
A-4 Total HAP emissions lbs
A-5 Total GHG emissions tons CO2e
Land & Ecosystems

Qualitative description

SEFA was first released in 2012 and updated in 2014. In 2019, SEFA was updated to incorporate new default footprint conversion factors for additional materials, diesel or gasoline engines of various sizes, and laboratory analyses. The 2019 update (Version 3.0) also provides additional areas for entering user-defined footprint conversion factors.

Instructions for SEFA Users

  • SEFA comprises three internally linked workbooks (files) in a standard spreadsheet (Excel) format; the files should be saved in a single directory to assure accurate/complete data exchange.
  • Optimal functioning of the workbooks relies on use of Microsoft Office 2013 or higher.
  • An “Introduction” worksheet (tab) in the “Main” workbook provides an overview of SEFA, including its data structure.
  • Technical support in using SEFA is not available outside the Agency; other parties interested in using or adapting the workbooks may wish to obtain technical assistance from qualified environmental or engineering professionals.

Supporting Methodology

EPA’s “Methodology for Understanding and Reducing a Project’s Environmental Footprint” report provides a seven-step process for quantifying the 21 metrics associated with a site cleanup. The report also addresses the value of footprint analysis; discusses the level of effort and cost involved in footprint analysis; details interpretative considerations; provides illustrative approaches to reducing a cleanup project’s environmental footprint; and contains related planning checklists and reference tables.