Who is causing mercury spills in Vancouver’s Stanley Park?

For the third time in less than a month, a Hazmat Crew was dispatched to Vancouver’s Stanley Park to clean-up a mercury spill.  In each of the incidents, the cause of the spill is either a broken thermometer or broken thermostat.

In each incident, it took hazmat teams a couple of hours completely clean up the tiny droplets of metal.

Vancouver police are working with Fire officials to determine if the three incidents are related, who is responsible, and what is the possible motive.

Exposure to Mercury and Health Implications

Mercury is a naturally occurring toxic heavy metal that is widely dispersed in nature.  Most human exposure results from fish consumption or dental amalgam.  Exposure to high levels of mercury, including acute exposure (exposure occurring over a short period of time, often less than a day) can have serious health impacts.

Typical acute exposure to mercury occurs due to an industrial accident.  Factors that determine whether health effects occur and their severity include: the type of mercury concerned; the dose; the age or developmental stage of the person exposed; the duration of exposure; and the route of exposure (inhalation, ingestion or dermal contact).

Elemental and methylmercury are toxic to the central and peripheral nervous systems. The inhalation of mercury vapour can produce harmful effects on the nervous, digestive and immune systems, lungs and kidneys, and may be fatal.

Mercury Clean-up

There are several methods for cleaning up mercury spills.  One method involves sprinkling sulfur powder over the contaminated area and rubbing it gently all over the surface and into the cracks with a cloth. The sulfur powder binds with mercury and can be collected with a cloth.

Environment Canada has a guidance document on how to clean up small mercury spills.  The United States Environmental Protection Agency has a 133-page guidance document that describes eight different treatment technologies for mercury in soil, waste, and water.

 

Canadian Company wins $17 million contract to supply environmental response equipment to the Coast Guard

Public Services and Procurement Canada, on behalf of the Canadian Coast Guard, recently announced that it has awarded a $1.7 million contract to Can-Ross Environmental Services Ltd. of Oakville, Ontario for the acquisition of 10,000 feet of environmental response equipment known as Tidal Seal Boom. The contract includes options for an additional 8,200 feet.  The award was granted following an open and competitive bid process.

The purchase of additional environmental response equipment by the Canadian Coast Guard is an effort to ensure it has modern equipment needed to respond to environmental spills quickly and effectively. The Coast Guard is striving to go beyond current standards regarding environmental spill response and is utilizing innovations and advancements in technology to do so.

Tidal Seal Boom acts as a barrier to protect coastal areas from spills and helps to contain pollution during active shoreline cleanup operations. The boom protects the shore by automatically adjusting to changing water levels, such as high and low tides, helping to ensure pollution doesn’t reach the shoreline while cleanup crews are at work.

The purchase of equipment from Can-Ross Environmental is part of the $1.5 billion Oceans Protection Plan being undertaken by the government of Canada.  It is the largest investment ever made to protect Canada’s coasts and waterways.  Since the Oceans Protection Plan started in November 2016, over 50 initiatives have been announced in the areas of marine safety, research and ecosystem protection that span all of Canada’s coasts

In a media release, the Honourable Bernadette Jordan, Minister of Fisheries, Oceans and the Canadian Coast Guard, stated:  “Under the Oceans Protection Plan, we are providing our dedicated Canadian Coast Guard members across Canada with the best equipment possible. The Tidal Boom will ensure the Coast Guard can continue to respond quickly and efficiently in the event of an environmental emergency. These investments will help strengthen the Coast Guard and ensure it remains a world-leader in ocean protection and marine environmental response.”

Under the contract, new equipment will be delivered to Canadian Coast Guard facilities in Hay River, Northwest TerritoriesParry Sound and Prescott, Ontario, and Saanichton, British Columbia.

Ontario: Discussion paper on modernizing hazardous waste reporting

The Ontario Ministry of the Environment, Conservation and Parks (MECP) recently announced that it received 76 comments on its “Modernizing Hazardous Waste Reporting in Ontario” discussion paper.

The MECP made changes to the Resource Recovery and Circular Economy Act (RRCEA), and the Environmental Protection Act (EPA) in Fall 2019, which allow the RPRA to provide digital reporting services, fee setting and collection for a wider range of waste and resource recovery programs.

The MECP issued a written letter of direction instructing the RPRA to prepare to deliver a digital reporting service for the Hazardous Waste program. The new hazardous waste digital reporting service would align with the open for business red tape reduction strategy by making it easier for the regulated community to track and report on waste.

Comments contributed to the proposed regulatory amendments and new proposed regulation and the MECP will continue to consider these comments as they take steps to update the Registration Guidance Manual for Generators of Liquid Industrial and Hazardous Waste and transition to the new digital reporting service.

Proposed Regulatory Changes

1. Amend Regulation 347 under the EPA to transition the delivery of hazardous waste digital reporting services to the RPRA

A. Transition delivery and operation of the hazardous waste digital reporting service

The MECP is proposing to amend Regulation 347 under the EPA to require the regulated community (including waste generators, carriers and receivers) to report waste management information to the RPRA instead of to the MECP, as they currently do. This would enable the RPRA to deliver and operate the hazardous waste digital reporting service, including collecting reports and fees from the regulated community.

B. Change registration and reporting requirements to support electronic service delivery

The amendments would also include changes to registration and reporting requirements to support a fully electronic reporting service. The new digital reporting service is intended to replace www.hwin.ca and paper document submissions.

Annual registration

The MECP is proposing to remove the annual registration renewal requirement (currently between January 1st to February 15th) and only collect information from generators at the time the business has a waste management activity to report (i.e. onsite storage/disposal/processing, or offsite movement of subject waste).

This would mean that businesses would complete an initial waste management activity report when they are reporting their first activity (using the new registry for the first time).

To ensure ongoing accuracy with facility, contact and payment information, the RPRA would require that businesses review and update their initially reported information when they are ready to report their first waste management activity after 365 days from the last time they reviewed and confirmed this information.

Reporting requirements

The MECP is proposing to amend Regulation 347 to provide more clarity about what waste management activities need to be reported to the RPRA and when they need to be reported. Reportable activities include both onsite and offsite management of subject waste and would remain the same. Reporting requirements for the Hazardous Waste program would be consolidated into one section.

The following activities would continue to be reportable waste management activities under the Hazardous Waste program:

  • Offsite management:
    • prior to completing the first off-site shipment of a subject waste
  • Onsite management:
    • within 90 days of generating and storing a subject waste where such waste is to be temporarily stored for more than 90 days and less than two years
    • prior to processing a subject waste onsite with the applicable Environmental Compliance Approval
    • prior to disposing of a subject waste onsite with the applicable approvals
    • prior to storing a subject waste for longer than two years with a valid Environmental Compliance Approval

Businesses that generate subject waste would be required to report their activities on, or prior to, the date that the activity takes place or within 90 days of generating or temporarily storing the subject waste if no other waste management activity has taken place. No generator of subject waste would be permitted to store subject waste for a period of greater than 90 days without reporting an activity to the RPRA. No generator would be permitted to manage such waste without reporting the activity to the RPRA.

In the near term, the ministry’s approach is to ensure that the proposed amendments would support the continued use of paper manifesting as an alternative to electronic reporting through the RPRA’s Registry, in a manner similar to that currently provided for under Regulation 347. Such reporting would continue to be provided directly to the ministry (director).

Report Completion

The MECP is proposing to amend Regulation 347 to clarify that reporting information would not be accepted in the new hazardous waste digital reporting service unless:

  • The entire waste management activity report is completed in a manner consistent with the requirements of the Regulation.
  • Any applicable fee payable by the generator is paid by or on behalf of the business.

This is intended to ensure that all members of the regulated community provide accurate information, on a timely basis and that they are paying for the subject waste that they generate in a timely manner.

Delegating Authority

The MECP is proposing that the new hazardous waste digital reporting service would allow delegates to register, report, and pay fees on behalf of generators. The generator would remain responsible for the subject waste that they generate and the information that is reported on their behalf. The RPRA would be responsible for ensuring confidential business information remains protected. The MECP is proposing to amend Regulation 347 to include a definition for ‘Delegate’ that would clarify this role.

The ability to delegate authority would provide flexibility for businesses (waste generators) to comply with the new hazardous waste digital reporting service, and ensure that the most accessible, knowledgeable and capable individuals are able to act on behalf of a business, should it be needed.

Paper-based reporting

The rules for paper-based reporting would remain the same in Regulation 347 because there is still a possibility that paper documents could be used in certain circumstances. In situations where paper manifests are used, businesses would continue to be required to ensure their manifest travels with the waste and applicable filing requirements are met with the ministry.

C. General housekeeping amendments to provide more clarity

The MECP is proposing to amend Regulation 347 to make various minor changes to provide more clarity and ensure consistency with other regulations.

Align with Federal regulatory phrases

Aligning with Federal regulatory phrases under the Transportation of Dangerous Goods Act(TDGA) would make it easier for businesses to learn and comply with both federal and provincial rules.

  • Align with the Federal phrasing in the TDGA by replacing “packaged” to “means of containment”.
  • The word “issued” should be removed when referencing TDGA manifests – because TDGA no longer “issues” manifests.
Definitions

Changes are needed to some existing definitions to provide more clarity for the regulated community.

  • The ‘field operation’ definition would be amended to clarify that specific medical clinics (blood donation/vaccinations and flu clinics) are included in the definition. This would reduce burden as these sites will not need to register and manifest at every site.
  • The ‘empty pesticide container’ definition would be updated to match the definition in Pesticides Act to help clarify and align with existing requirements.
  • The ‘reactive waste’ definition would be updated to correct a grammatical error and make it clear that the definition of reactive waste contains an independent list of criteria and not a multi-checklist of requirements. For example, if the waste meets any one criterion in the list, then it meets the reactive waste definition.
  • Both the ‘ignitable waste’ and ‘reactive waste’ definitions would be updated to align with the actual federal titles.

Some new definitions (i.e. RPRA, Registrar, Registry) would be needed so that the RPRA can deliver and operate the new hazardous waste digital reporting service. These definitions would have the same meaning as in the RRCEA. Other defined terms may also be required or desirable.

2. Create a new regulation under the RRCEA to carry over fee exemptions for certain activities related to hazardous waste – the RPRA would be required to consider the exemptions when setting program cost recovery fees.

The MECP is proposing a new regulation under the RRCEA that would carry over fee exemptions for certain activities related to hazardous waste from Regulation 347. The RPRA would be required to consider these exemptions, which would be based on the current exemptions when setting fees to recover the full cost of the Hazardous Waste program.

All fee setting references in Regulation 347 would be revoked when the new hazardous waste digital reporting service is implemented because the RPRA would have the responsibility to set and collect fees. The RPRA would be required to consult with stakeholders prior to establishing or amending fees for 45 days and post these fees on their website.

Read about and comment on the related proposed new regulation under the RRCEA.

Maintain government oversight for the hazardous waste program

Government would continue to play an important and on-going role in protecting the health and safety of the people of Ontario, and the environment. With respect to the Hazardous Waste program, the ministry would maintain compliance and enforcement, and program and policy oversight activities.

The RPRA would be responsible for operating the hazardous waste digital reporting service to ensure reports are complete and related fees are collected. The RPRA would also notify the ministry of any suspected non-compliant activities. All incidents of non-compliance with program requirements would continue to be followed-up on by the ministry.

The ministry would continue to ensure all generators, carriers, and receivers are complying with requirements under the EPA and Regulation 347 to safely store, transport, process, and manage subject waste in Ontario. The ministry would continue to do this by conducting compliance inspections and following up on reported incidents of improper management of waste. The ministry would also continue to enforce program requirements through investigations and prosecutions.

Benefits of the new digital reporting service

A new digital reporting service for the Hazardous Waste program, would make reporting simpler, faster and more cost-effective. This change would also help us to meet our goals to:

  • Go digital – Implementing a modern digital reporting service that replaces the existing paper-based manifest program would improve our existing service and knowledge base, making it easier to report activities related to subject waste (i.e. hazardous waste and liquid industrial waste as defined in Regulation 347).
  • Hold polluters accountable – Implementing a modern digital reporting service would allow for more effective and timely compliance monitoring and enforcement actions.

Improved electronic data tracking and reporting would provide the regulated community and the ministry with an important set of tools that reduce administrative burden, saving time and money. For example, the service would:

  • Reduce unnecessary manual data entry.
  • Reduce the amount of time and money businesses spend preparing and mailing paperwork to the ministry, correcting administrative errors on paper, or searching for missing paperwork.
  • Provide the ministry with more accurate and timely information to inform decision making and policy development.
  • Allow the ministry to focus on risk-based compliance and enforcement to ensure subject waste is appropriately managed.

This new hazardous waste digital reporting service would align with Ontario’s Digital Service mandate by eliminating outdated approaches to processes, such as reporting using the existing online system (i.e. Hazardous Waste Information Network – HWIN) and using the more burdensome paper-based submission processes (e.g. paper manifests) that prevent the delivery of people-centered services.

The new hazardous waste digital reporting service would align with the Made-in-Ontario Environment Plan by modernizing the way that the regulated community tracks and reports on subject waste (i.e. hazardous waste and liquid industrial waste as defined in Regulation 347 of the EPA). A better digital reporting service will enable more efficient and timely compliance monitoring and enforcement actions, which would provide assurance for Ontarians that polluters are held accountable, and subject waste is being appropriately and safely managed.

 

Town in Newfoundland & Labrador fined $50,000 for illegal discharges into river

The Town of Baie Verte recently pleaded guilty to two offences under the Canadian Fisheries Act in the Provincial Court of Newfoundland and Labrador in Grand Falls-Windsor, and was ordered to pay a total fine of $50,000.

The offences relate to the discharge of water containing elevated levels of chlorine from the town’s potable-water system into the Baie Verte River. The first offence relates to the release of a deleterious substance into water frequented by fish; the second, to a failure to comply with a Fisheries Act direction that ordered the town to take action to remedy the situation or prevent future occurrences.

In August 2017, following a report that chlorinated water was being discharged from the town’s potable-water system into the Baie Verte River, Environment and Climate Change Canada enforcement officers conducted an onsite inspection and took field measurements, which confirmed that the chlorinated water was deposited into the river. On September 5, 2017, officers collected water samples for laboratory analysis. The analysis confirmed that the chlorinated water was a deleterious substance, as defined by the Fisheries Act. Consequently, enforcement officers initiated a formal investigation.

In September 2017, officers issued a Fisheries Act direction, which required the Town of Baie Verte to take all reasonable measures to prevent the deposit or to counteract, mitigate, or remedy any adverse effects that result from the deposit of the deleterious substance into the Baie Verte River. The town was also required to provide a written report documenting the measures taken to comply with the direction.

Fisheries Act direction is a compliance tool that may be issued by Environment and Climate Change Canada’s Enforcement Branch, when there is a deposit of a deleterious substance into water frequented by fish or when there is a serious and imminent danger of such an incident and immediate action is necessary. For example, a direction may be issued to compel a person who has the charge, management, or control of either a deleterious substance or an activity resulting in a deposit or the danger of a deposit to take remedial or preventative action.

Between November 8, 2017, and May 23, 2018, enforcement officers conducted field measurements and collected additional water samples for analysis. Each time, the chlorine concentration detected in the samples was in the range of 120 to 6000 times higher than the recommended limits under the guidelines established by the Canadian Council of Ministers of the Environment.

The Town of Baie Verte failed to comply with the direction and was consequently charged with committing an offence under paragraph 40(3)(g) of the Fisheries Act. In addition, the town was charged for contravening subsection 36(3) by depositing a deleterious substance into the Baie Verte River.

As a result of this conviction, the Town of Baie Verte will be added to the Environmental Offenders Registry.

Although chlorine is frequently used in wastewater treatment and drinking-water systems, high concentrations of chlorine and chlorine residuals can be deleterious to fish. The Canadian Council of Ministers of the Environment’s Water Quality Guidelines for the Protection of Aquatic Life establishes 0.5 µg/L as the recommended limit for chlorine.

Montréal company fined $260,000 for violations of Canada’s PCB Regulations

On September 1, 4422236 Canada Inc. was fined $260,000 after pleading guilty to two counts of violating the PCB Regulations and the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999.

An investigation conducted by Environment and Climate Change Canada (ECCC) enforcement officers revealed that 4422236 Canada Inc., owner of the Baltex Building (in Montréal), was using a transformer containing polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) at a concentration greater than 500 ppm, in September 2018. The investigation also found that, as of June 2019, the company had not complied with the environmental protection compliance order issued by an enforcement officer in November 2018, requiring it to dispose of the transformer.

PCBs have been widely used for decades, particularly as refrigerants and lubricants for certain types of electrical devices like transformers and capacitors. PCBs are toxic, and measures under the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 have been taken to control their use, import, manufacture, storage, and release into the environment.

 

Quebec mining company fined $400,000 for environmental violations

Seleine Mines was recently fined a total of $400,000 in Quebec court after pleading guilty to four counts of violating subsection 125(1) of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA, 1999).  Under subsection 125(1) of CEPA, 1999, disposal of waste at sea is prohibited without a permit.

The charges and conviction stem from an investigation by Environment and Climate Change Canada (ECCC) enforcement officers revealed that the company had disposed of dredged material on four occasions between August 10 and 14, 2014, outside of the disposal area authorized by the disposal at sea permit issued by Environment and Climate Change Canada (ECCC).

Disposal at sea is prohibited unless a permit is issued by ECCC’s Disposal at Sea Program. Only a short list of non-hazardous wastes can be considered for disposal. A permit’s conditions on quantities of waste, disposal sites, and special precautionary measures are designed to ensure that the disposal is the most practical and environment-friendly option.

U.S. EPA and State of Nebraska reach settlement over alleged environmental violations at hazardous waste incinerator

The United States Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) and the State of Nebraska recently announced a settlement with the owners of the Kimball, Nebraska hazardous waste incinerator over  alleged violations of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), Clean Air Act, and Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act.

The alleged violations included failure to manage and contain hazardous wastes; failure to comply with air emission limits; failure to comply with chemical accident prevention safety requirements; and failure to timely report use of certain toxic chemicals. Under the terms of the settlement, the owner agreed to pay a $790,000 civil penalty and will improve facility practices to protect facility workers and the surrounding community from potentially harmful releases of pollutants.

The Kimball hazardous waste incinerator serves the entire United States as a storage and treatment facility for a variety of industrial waste utilizing a 45,000 ton-per-year fluidized bed incinerator. The state-of-the-art thermal oxidation unit (TOU) is capable of maximum destruction efficiencies of hazardous waste and is able to handle an extremely wide variety of feeds. Delisted ash from the TOU will be placed in an on-site monofill built to RCRA Subtitle C standards.

According to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Nebraska Department of Environment and Energy (NDEE), the Kimball facility has been subject to previous enforcement actions, including penalty assessments, in 1997, 2004 and 2010.

According to EPA and NDEE, improper management of wastes incinerated at the facility led to unsafe conditions that could result in employee injury and/or releases of harmful air pollution outside the facility. For example, the agencies allege that the owner failed to address multiple fire incidents resulting from the company’s mixing of incompatible wastes.

Terms of the settlement include upgraded plans to classify, manage and contain the wastes incinerated at the facility; an updated fire prevention and response program; and the performance of an environmental audit at the facility to identify and address any continuing noncompliance.

U.S. EPA Challenge: $50,000 Reward for Innovative Ways to Destroy PFAS

The U.S. EPA is partnering with the U.S. Department of Defense’s Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP) and Environmental Security Technology Certification Program (ESTCP); the Environmental Council of States (ECOS) and the Environmental Research Institute of the States (ERIS); Michigan Department of Environment, Great Lakes & Energy; and Colorado Department of Public Health & Environment, to co-sponsor a technical challenge regarding the destruction of per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS). The challenge asks solvers to submit detailed plans for a non-thermal way of destroying PFAS in concentrated film forming foam (AFFF), while creating the least amount of potentially harmful byproducts.

Currently, the U.S. EPA is investigating all methods of destroying PFAS. Incineration has been used to treat PFAS-contaminated media, and EPA scientists are collaborating with the private sector to evaluate the effectiveness of thermal treatment technologies to completely destroy PFAS. The goal of this challenge is to discover new non-thermal technologies and approaches that can remove at least 99 percent of PFAS in unused AFFF, without creating any harmful byproducts. Although PFAS compounds can be found in various waste streams, the challenge is focused on unused AFFF.

The challenge is intended to encourage the development of new approaches, technologies, or technology combinations that meet the following objectives:

  • Must be applicable for use on unspent aqueous film forming foam (AFFF) from unused AFFF concentrates containing 3 percent and/or 6 percent PFAS;
  • Must destroy at least 99 percent of the PFAS in the unused AFFF concentrates, including PFAS byproducts that may form by volatilization, particulates, and leaching from effluents;
  • Must demonstrate scalability and cost effectiveness for a defined quantity over thermal methods used to treat the same waste stream (AFFF).

Additional features that are desired (but not required) of submitted PFAS destruction technologies/ approaches:

  • Demonstrates compatibility with current production and destruction practices;
  • Avoids creating other toxic residues after destruction of PFAS, including hazardous chemicals identified in EPA’s ToxCast database;
  • Is currently accessible in the marketplace or near-market ready.

The ideal technology would:

  • Perform onsite destruction of at least 99 percent of PFAS in AFFF formulations;
  • Be currently on the market or near market;
  • Destroy parent PFAS compounds;
  • Destroy short-chain PFAS byproducts (e.g., CF4) if volatilization occurs;
  • Destroy or neutralize any unwanted byproducts (e.g., HF) that would need to be incinerated or landfilled in a hazardous waste facility;
  • Be more cost effective than thermal destruction;
  • Have good environmental and public health outcomes (e.g., does not transfer PFAS or any unwanted byproducts into other media);
    Be potentially applicable to other PFAS waste streams (e.g., biosolids, contaminated ground water, etc).

Solvers are not required to give up any of their intellectual property (“IP”) rights to the Seeker to be eligible to receive an award.

Eligibility

  • Winning Solvers must certify they do not have identical or essentially equivalent work currently funded by a Federal agency.
  • Federal employees acting within the scope of their employment should consult his or her ethics official before participating in the Challenge.
  • Solvers are not required to give up any of their intellectual property (“IP”) rights to the Seeker to be eligible to receive an award.
  • Submissions to this Challenge must be received by 11:59 PM (US Eastern Time) on November 23, 2020.
  • Late submissions will not be considered.

How to Enter

​To submit a solution to the Innovative Ways to Destroy PFAS Challenge please visit the InnoCentive webpage Uand follow the instructions.

SNC-Lavalin awarded National Nuclear Cleanup Contract from United States Department of Energy

SNC-Lavalin (TSX: SNC) was recently awarded an indefinite delivery/indefinite quantity (IDIQ) contract to provide nationwide deactivation, decommissioning and removal (DD&R) of nuclear facilities, as well as waste management and program support from the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM), through its Atkins Nuclear Secured Holdings Corporation entity. This multiple award contract has a 10-year ordering period, and a maximum ceiling of $3 billion US, split between nine companies. This contract is within SNCL Engineering Services, the cornerstone of our strategy moving forward to greater growth and support for our partners and customers.

“We are pleased to be included in this list of awardees to provide deactivation, decommissioning and removal of nuclear facilities to the US DOE to reduce environmental risks,” said Sandy Taylor, President, Nuclear, SNC-Lavalin. “Waste management and decommissioning is a significant and growing part of SNC-Lavalin’s nuclear business, and this contract solidifies our position in this important market.” SNC-Lavalin previously held a DOE-EM prime contract that preceded this nationwide DD&R contract.

About Atkins Nuclear Secured
Atkins Nuclear Secured Holdings Corporation is a business unit within SNC-Lavalin’s global nuclear sector focused on the US federal market.  SNC-Lavalin acquired WS Atkins plc on July 3, 2017.

About Atkins
Atkins (www.atkinsglobal.com) is a design, engineering and project management consultancies, employing over 18,300 people across the UK, North AmericaMiddle East and AfricaAsia Pacific and Europe.

About SNC-Lavalin
SNC-Lavalin is a fully integrated professional services and project management company with offices around the world. SNC-Lavalin offers services in consulting & advisory, intelligent networks & cybersecurity, design & engineering, procurement, project & construction management, operations & maintenance, decommissioning and sustaining capital.

SOURCE: SNC-Lavalin

Canadian Government Awards Contract for clean-up of KELSET Creek Pond, British Columbia

The Canadian government recently announced that it had awarded a contract to complete the second phase of the ḰEL¸SET (formerly Reay Creek) Remediation Project that will remove sediments with elevated levels of metals from this 200 metre long pond. Last summer, the first phase of creek sediment remediation was completed within the Victoria Airport boundary.

The pond clean-up work will begin this summer and is expected to be complete by fall 2020.  The remediation work will be restricted to a short window of time between the cutthroat trout and coho salmon’s critical spawning timeframe in the ḰEL¸SET (Reay) Creek.

The clean-up work involves diverting the creek around the pond area, excavating contaminated sediment in the pond, transporting the sediment to an approved facility for treatment/disposal, and backfilling the pond. It is estimated that approximately 3,900 cubic meters of sediment will be removed from the pond, which is about seven times more than the volume excavated during last year’s work.

The contract awarded to QM Environmental for $1,144,350 will be closely monitored by Transport Canada to ensure the safety of workers and the community. The work will be conducted in accordance with all federal and provincial guidelines, including those addressing COVID-19. Construction and environmental monitoring will be conducted throughout the project to ensure that clean-up activities comply with Town of Sidney bylaws and do not adversely impact the surrounding environment.

Reay Creek is also known by the Sencoten name ‘Kelset,’ (pronounced “KWAL-sit”). It is a relatively small creek originating both on the east side of the Victoria International Airport and the northeast slope of Mount Newton. It drains into Bazan Bay near Sidney.

A healthy waterway is essential for the well-being of fish who live there. Fish health is threatened when high concentrations of metals that don’t break down remain in the environment, threatening the marine food web.

The ḰEL¸SET (Reay) Creek Remediation Project is funded through Canada’s Federal Contaminated Sites Action Plan (FCSAP). FCSAP provides funding to assess and remediate federal contaminated sites and is coordinated by Environment and Climate Change Canada and the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat.

Marc Garneau, the federal Minister of Transport stated, “Completing this phase of the ḰEL¸SET (Reay) Creek remediation project demonstrates our government’s commitment to remediating contaminated sites and protecting the environment. Cleaning-up the pond will reduce threats to the pond ecosystem and the food web, in addition to providing a healthier home for cutthroat trout and coho salmon.”

The initial phase of the remediation project, conducted in 2019, removed and treated 923 tonnes of contaminated sediment from portions of the creek bed located on the Victoria Airport.