A guide to the four levels of Hazardous Materials (HazMat) response

Written by Bryan W Sommers – SGM U.S. Army, Ret. , Argon Electronics

Hazardous materials that are mishandled, incorrectly transported or used with malicious intent, can pose a substantial risk to human health and the environment.

How effectively hazardous materials (HazMat) incidents are managed and resolved hinges on the knowledge, training and skill of those charged with response.

In this article we examine the roles and responsibilities of the four HazMat response levels and we discuss how simulator detector technology can be used to enhance HazMat training outcomes.

Awareness Level

For responders working in awareness level roles, the chance of encountering the presence of a hazardous material in the course of their normal daily duties is relatively small.

In many cases though, it is awareness level personnel who will be “first on the scene” of a HazMat incident – and it is they who will be responsible for taking charge of the initial protective actions (isolating or evacuating the area, calling for specialist assistance etc) that will minimize the impact on people and the environment.

Among the expected competencies of an awareness level responder are:

  • An understanding of what hazardous materials are and the situations and locations in which they are most likely to be present
  • The ability to recognize markings, placards or labels that indicate the presence of hazardous materials
  • Familiarity with the documentation / resources used to identify hazardous materials (such as the Emergency Response Guidebook (ERG) or its equivalent)

Operations Level

Responders working at the operations level play a hands-on and defensive role in initial HazMat response.

It is expected however that they will do as much as is possible to mitigate the incident without having to set foot inside the Hot Zone.

The mission-specific responsibilities of operations level responders include:

  • Assisting in controlling, and minimizing the spread, of the HazMat release
  • Knowledge of defensive HazMat techniques such as absorption, damming, diverting, vapour dispersion and suppression
  • Experience in basic air monitoring
  • Technical and mass decontamination
  • Assisting with evacuation and victim rescue
  • The establishing of hazard zones
  • The preserving of evidence

Technician Level

Responders operating at technician level are highly specialized HazMat personnel who take an offensive-action role when responding to known or suspected releases of hazardous materials.

While HazMat technicians may not be expected to be experts in science, it is assumed that they will have a robust understanding of chemistry, biology and/or nuclear physics. Many also have a substantial CBRN training background.

A HazMat Technician’s primary responsibilities include:

  • The performing of advanced risk-based hazard assessments in order to analyse the scope of HazMat incidents
  • Experience in the selection and operation of advanced detection, monitoring and testing equipment
  • The ability to select and use specialized Personal Protective Equipment (PPE)
  • Selection of decontamination procedures and control equipment

Depending on their level of training and the scope of the incident, HazMat Technicians may also be required respond to specialized incidents involving flammable gases or flammable liquids and/or to have knowledge of radiological dosimetry and recording procedures.

Specialist Level

The Specialist responder is the highest level of responder for HazMat incidents, with an in-depth and highly advanced level of scientific knowledge.

In many cases they may be required to provide a more observational, trouble-shooting role – observing Technicians and watching out for potential complications. In other cases they may take a more hands-on approach, working alongside HazMat Technicians within the Hot Zone.

Specialist level responders may also be expected to work with the Incident Commander (IC) from within a command post.

Importance of Training

The real-world demands of a responder’s day-to-day role, together with the ongoing challenges of limited time and resources, means it is crucial that the HazMat training they receive is relevant to their work and tailored to their expected duties and tasks.

Equally too, it is important that they are provided with the opportunity to demonstrate their HazMat response skills and knowledge in both a classroom setting and in the context of a real-life environment.

The provision of realistic and engaging hands-on training can have a vital role to play in ensuring responders are equipped for the challenges of managing live HazMat incidents.

Integrating the use of simulator detector equipment into training scenarios can also be beneficial in enabling trainees to experience hands-on training that is rigorous, compelling and repeatable, but where there is no health and safety or environmental risk.

If you are interested to explore how the use of simulator detectors can enhance your HazMat training outcomes then please get in touch with one of our experts today.


About the Author

Sergeant Major Bryan W Sommers has forged a distinguished career in the fields of CBRNe and HazMat training. He recently retired after twenty-two years service in the US Army, with fourteen years spent operating specifically in Weapons of Mass Destruction (WMD) environments. In 2020 he was appointed as Argon Electronics’ North American business development manager.

Preparing Post-Construction Cleanup Sites for Natural Disasters

The United States Association of State and Territorial Waste Management Officials (ASTSWMO) CERCLA Post Construction Focus Group has developed a checklist called, Preparing Post-Construction Cleanup Sites for Natural Disasters, which is intended to help States in identifying efficient and effective measures for preparation in advance of potential natural disasters to aid in the identification of likely concerns following a natural disaster. The information provided on the checklist can be used to identify and respond to changed conditions at sites to support action to ensure protectiveness of human health and the environment.

Purpose of the Checklist

The purpose of this checklist is to provide a planning tool for post-construction sites (sites) in the event of a natural disaster. The checklist was developed for CERCLA post-construction sites; however, it may also be used for similar “non-CERCLA” post-construction sites. The checklist includes site-specific information that should be considered prior to and post natural disaster event to streamline site security, minimize damage to remedy components, and reduce the risk of site-related environmental impacts. The checklist does not replace Health
and Safety Plans (HASP), Standard Operating Procedures (SOP), or other site-specific / programmatic guidance documents. Site managers are encouraged to complete the checklist following review of these guidance documents, and incorporate supporting information, as  appropriate.

Recommendations

Based upon the development of this checklist, the team recommends the following practices that will help States be prepared to react following a natural disaster:
• Pre-event planning: Assess site conditions to compile site specific details to complete the checklist prior to a natural disaster.
• Pre-event information: Identify and collect site plans/data and contact information so the information is readily available should a disaster occur. Periodically review this information to ensure that it is current.
• Post-event information: Use the checklist to identify conditions that require action/repair and track planned actions.

The team also recommends considering the use of a version of this checklist for sites that may be in active cleanup stages.

 

About the ASTSWMO CERCLA CPC FG

The ASTSWMO CERCLA Post Construction Focus Group (CPC FG) is comprised of State and Territorial (State) members from all United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regions. This checklist was prepared by the ASTSWMO CPC FG, under Cooperative Agreement 83870001 with the U.S. EPA Office of Superfund Remediation and Technology Innovation (OSRTI).

The mission of the ASTSWMO CPC FG is to promote facilitation and maintenance of reliable, effective, and protective remedies constructed at contaminated sites, to include identification of the resources necessary following remedy construction, and to communicate State program strategies effectively among interested parties.

Dangerous Goods Online Training: How to Choose the Best Provider

Written by Hazmat University

Dangerous goods training is required for anyone who handles or ships dangerous goods by ground, air, or ocean. You have to be trained in IATA/ICAO regulations (if you ship by air), 49 CFR (if you ship by ground), or IMDG regulations (if you ship by vessel).

Choosing the right dangerous goods online training provider is critical if you want to be adequately trained in the applicable federal and international regulations related to the safe transportation of dangerous goods.

The factors you need to consider while choosing a dangerous goods online training provider are listed below.

Training Programs Offered

Does the dangerous goods training provider offer initial training as well as recurrent training programs? Do their training programs thoroughly cover all relevant regulations? These are the first questions you need to ask while choosing a hazmat training provider.

It is also advisable to choose a training provider who offers function-specific training programs for each mode of transportation (IATA programs for air, IMDG programs for  ocean, and 49 CFR programs for ground). If you ship by more than one mode of transportation, then you would likely choose a dangerous goods training provider that offers multimodal training programs. These in-depth courses cover the dangerous goods regulations pertaining to two or three modes of transportation, depending on the course.

By proactively seeking a reputable and knowledgeable training provider that offers the exact services you need, you can attend a dangerous goods training program that is tailored to your business needs. For instance, if you ship dangerous goods by ground and air, you can sign up for a multimodal training program which covers 49 CFR and IATA regulations.

Dangerous Goods Online Course Material

The quality of a dangerous goods online training program depends to a great extent on the course material it covers. Ideally, the course material should cover a minimum of the following information:

  • Identification and classification of dangerous goods based on the risks the materials present and the criteria of the 9 hazard classes
  • The regulatory requirements pertaining to packing, marking, and labeling dangerous goods
  • Dangerous goods placarding and segregation requirements for transport vehicles
  • The regulatory requirements related to loading/unloading of dangerous goods
  • Completion of the various forms of shipping paperwork that are required to ship dangerous goods by ground, air, and ocean
  • The regulations pertaining to prohibited and restricted dangerous goods
  • Regulatory exceptions and the circumstances under which they are applicable
  • The most common security hazards associated with shipping dangerous goods and applicable safety measures to take

Dangerous Goods Training Methodologies

What methods of presentation does the dangerous goods training provider offer? Do they provide in-person, instructor-led webinars, as well as online training programs? This is something you need to consider, especially if you have budgetary and/or time constraints to contend with.

Dangerous Good Classroom Training and Instructor-led Webinars

Classroom and webinar training programs are instructor-led and are conducted at a specific location at a specific time. Such training sessions are often held at a centralized location that is convenient to a wide range of attendees.  Participants are required to physically attend the classroom presentation or webinar and these training sessions are most often designed to provide general information that is common to a wide-array of shippers. This is often an economical option to receive interactive face-to-face training but this option still requires planning and budgeting from a travel standpoint.

Dangerous Goods Onsite Training

Onsite training programs, on the other hand, are usually highly personalized and are held at your specific place of business. The course material is tailored to the specific needs of your organization, which provides many advantages. However, similar to classroom and webinar training programs, onsite training still requires participants to physically attend the course at the determined place and time. These types of training courses also usually come at a premium cost.

Dangerous Goods Online Training

On the contrary, Dangerous goods online training programs, do not require your physical presence at all. You can access the course material using your tablet or computer at any time or any place with an internet connection. As such, this is perhaps the most convenient and cost-effective method of obtaining required dangerous goods training. Online dangerous goods training sessions can save you a lot of time and money, since they do not involve any travel costs, instructor fees, or scheduling commitments.

Choose the Best Dangerous Goods Online Training Program Provider

Even amidst the COVID-19 crisis, dangerous goods online training options are available for hazmat employees on the frontlines of the supply chain.


About the Author

Hazmat University provides online hazmat training to help you satisfy hazardous materials training requirements for all modes of transportation.

Transport Canada Emergency Response Guidebook — 2020

The Emergency Response Guidebook 2020 edition will be available late spring 2020. For free paper copies’ pre-order, please send an email to: [email protected]

Who is eligible to get free paper copies?

Canadian First Responders from public emergency services such as:

  • municipal fire departments
  • police departments
  • ambulance services
  • RCMP
  • First Nation emergency services, can get free paper copies according to operational needs

These First Responders can get free paper copies according to operational needs, which include:

  • one paper copy of the Guidebook per emergency vehicle or per emergency kit bag (such as for volunteer firefighters who use their personal vehicle)
  • replacement copies as required for broken or damaged copies
  • copies used in class for in-house training purposes, on the condition they are to be retained for reuse in future classes
  • Canadian dispatch centers that pass on technical information about dangerous goods to First Responders can get a small number of free paper copies for use in the dispatch center
  • in remote areas where there are no First Responders available, other Canadian municipal, provincial, territorial or federal authorities acting as public emergency services may get free paper copies according to emergency response operational needs, if they are likely to be the first to arrive on scene of a dangerous goods incident
  • transportation of dangerous goods inspectors, remedial measures specialists and provincial inspectors who respond to dangerous goods accidents can get one free copy each for use during their duties

The importance of collaboration in countering CBRNe threats

Written by Steven Pike, Argon Electronics

In what is a rapidly changing and increasingly challenging global environment, the importance of maintaining international cooperation in countering CBRNe threats has never been more crucial.

The successful management of any form of cross-border hazard – be it biological, chemical, nuclear or otherwise – relies on targeted, sustained and collaborative action.

The value of developing a cohesive approach to CBRNe response was just one of the topics touched on by Henriette Geiger in her opening speech at the Annual General Meeting of the European Union CBRN Risk Mitigation Centres of Excellence in Brussels in June 2019, in which she stated:

“We are facing challenges today that go beyond national borders and [that] cannot be tackled alone.

“This is true for cooperation on CBRN matters, as witnessed by recent CBRN attacks and events in Europe…[and] also by the re-emergence of epidemic diseases.”

Countering invisible threats

Fast forward just nine months, and the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic is demonstrating all too starkly just how vitally important it is to maintain global cooperation in the fight against an invisible yet deadly threat.

From governments to tech companies to international agencies, the race is on to put in place measures that can help to contain the spread of the coronavirus.

The challenge in any crisis situation though is in ensuring that those personnel operating on the frontline of emergency response are sufficiently trained and equipped to handle what can often be complex, highly charged and in many cases unprecedented emergency situations.

The role of realistic CBRNe training

When planning exercises for diverse CBRNe or HazMat threats, a key priority is to develop relevant scenarios that facilitate optimum readiness, maintain maximum levels of safety and present minimal regulatory burden.

In the last decade, there has been an increasing interest in the use of hands-on training exercises using simulators to enable civilian and military CBRNe practitioners to test their technical knowledge in a manner that is realistic, cost-effective and safe.

Classroom learning will always continue to provide value in helping build theoretical understanding of the science and technology that underpins CBRNe defence.

But it is through the provision of realistic training that knowledge and competency can truly be put to the test.

Hands-on training that uses actual equipment (or its simulator equivalent) can help to build deeper understanding of the key science that underpins the release, dispersal and measurement of CBRNe agents.

By incorporating the use of simulator detectors in the context of CBRNe exercises, there is also the opportunity for personnel to gain familiarity both with the chemical and physical properties of specific hazards and with the ways that these hazards may affect individuals, equipment and infrastructure.

The value of international collaboration

At a time when international cooperation can offer significant benefits, the cooperative research agreement (CRADA) signed between Argon Electronics UK Ltd and the the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is an initiative that promises to both bolster and re-envision the delivery of realistic hands-on CBRNe training.

The two-year agreement, valued at $2.55 million, merges LLNL’s game-changing Radiation Field Training Simulator (RaFTS) technology with Argon Electronics’ extensive experience in the creation and development of simulation hardware and software.

While the project is currently focused on enhancing the provision of radiation training, there is the ability for the same technology to be applied across the broader range of CBRNe response, and in doing so to substantially raise the bar of emergency preparedness.

As the events of COVID-19 pandemic have demonstrated, the consequences of CBRNe emergencies can stretch national capabilities to their very limits.

While responsibility for first response remains with individual nations, there is also much to be gained from countries working together, combining their resources and developing common frameworks in order to mitigate against the effects of future global threats.


About the Author

Steven Pike is the Founder and Managing Director of Argon Electronics, a leader in the development and manufacture of Chemical, Biological, Radiological and Nuclear (CBRN) and hazardous material (HazMat) detector simulators. He is interested in liaising with CBRN professionals and detector manufacturers to develop training simulators as well as CBRN trainers and exercise planners to enhance their capability and improve the quality of CBRN and Hazmat training.

Challenges to Environmental Investigations and Cleanups During the COVID-19 Crisis

Written by John McGahren, Stephanie R. Feingold, Ariel Kapoano, and Jenna Ferraro, Morgan, Lewis & Bockius LLP

Business closures and remote work requirements, work stoppages, travel restrictions, state and federal government slowdowns, and supply-chain disruptions are impacting parties’ abilities to satisfy obligations pursuant to environmental settlements, including administrative consent orders or judicial consent decrees with the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and administrative orders with various state environmental agencies as well as compliance obligations under federal environmental laws such as the Clean Air Act, Clean Water Act, and Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA).

State Guidance

Although the CDC has released guidelines recommending work from home and social distancing, there are currently no federal mandates or executive orders requiring business shutdowns or mandatory quarantine. Instead, many states, counties, and municipalities are releasing executive orders as well as nonbinding policies ranging from shelter-in-place to closing nonessential businesses and limiting gatherings of people.

These state and local mandates uniformly exempt “essential businesses” from such directives. The “essential business” exemption includes services and sectors that promote public safety, health, and welfare, although exactly what constitutes an “essential business” can vary. For example:

New York: Executive Order 202.6 exempts “essential businesses” to include healthcare operations (including research and laboratory services); essential infrastructure (including utilities); telecommunication; airports and transportation infrastructure; essential manufacturing (including food processing and pharmaceuticals); essential retail (including grocery stores and pharmacies); essential services (including trash collection, mail, and shipping services; news media; banks and related financial institutions); providers of basic necessities to economically disadvantaged populations; construction; vendors of essential services to maintain the safety, sanitation and essential operations of residences or other essential businesses; and vendors that provide essential services or products (including logistics and technology support, child care, and services needed to ensure the continuing operation of government agencies and provide for the health, safety, and welfare of the public).

New Jersey: Executive Order No. 104 exempts “essential businesses,” defined to include “grocery/food stores, pharmacies, medical supply stores, gas stations, healthcare facilities and ancillary stores within healthcare facilities.” All gatherings within the state are limited to 50 persons or fewer, except for “normal operations at airports, bus and train stations, medical facilities, office environments, factories, assemblages for the purpose of industrial or manufacturing work, construction sites, mass transit, or the purchase of groceries or consumer goods.”

It is less clear, however, whether environmental cleanups and investigations would constitute “essential businesses” subject to these exemptions. Furthermore, some states have expanded their initial executive orders, and others may follow suit. For example, while Pennsylvania initially recommended the closure of nonessential businesses, on March 19 Governor Tom Wolf signed an executive order forcing the closure of all but “life-sustaining” businesses. The state will begin enforcement actions against noncompliant businesses on March 21 under the terms of this order. Construction activities, for example, are no longer permitted to operate in Pennsylvania.  Additionally, on March 19, Governor Gavin Newsom of California signed an executive order requiring all residents to stay home, except as needed to maintain continuity of operations of the 16 “federal critical infrastructure sectors” including critical manufacturing, chemical, emergency services, energy, healthcare and public health, financial services, food and agriculture, and water and wastewater. And on March 20, just one day after having directed 75% of all nonessential employees to stay home, New York Governor Andrew Cuomo announced that he would be putting out an executive order mandating that 100% of employees in “nonessential” businesses in the state stay home.

Many state environmental agencies have not yet released guidance on the impacts of COVID-19. Moreover, even if environmental cleanups are permitted to proceed, maintaining the recommended “social distancing” in site investigation or remediation activities presents a challenge. Further challenges to ongoing site investigations and cleanups may also arise due to workforce absenteeism due to illness or caring for an ill family member.

EPA Guidance

EPA has not yet released guidance on the impact to agency operations due to COVID-19. Moreover, each site is differently situated, so there may be no one-size-fits-all solution. Parties currently remediating sites pursuant to settlements with EPA should carefully scrutinize their respective agreements and orders, including the force majeure clauses, to determine whether current circumstances may constitute such an event, and how and when to notify the agency. Most such provisions require notification within days, or even hours, of the discovery of the force majeure event, prompting yet more uncertainty as to whether there has been a trigger based on the novel pandemic response gripping the nation.

For example, EPA’s Model Consent Decree Language and Model Administrative Consent Order Language both define force majeure events as any event arising from “causes beyond the control” of respondents that “delays or prevents the performance of any obligation” under the order despite respondents’ “best efforts to fulfill the obligation.”

Each ongoing cleanup faces unique challenges depending on locality and nature of the cleanup. Responsible parties should consider outreach to EPA requesting the following actions:

  • Recognize the rapidly changing circumstances at the local, state, and federal level caused by COVID-19
  • Temporarily suspend notice deadlines for force majeure events caused by the COVID-19 crisis, as well as waive penalties for failure to timely notice or meet a deadline where the implications of COVID-19 have made it impracticable or impossible
  • Work with responsible parties on an individualized basis to determine whether ongoing work can continue and the extent to which deadlines should be extended, and follow a dispute process in the event of disagreement
  • Acknowledge that there may not be a one-size-fits-all approach for sites that are at different stages of remedial progress and subject to varying state restrictions

Until state and federal environmental authorities take affirmative action, responsible parties should consider proactive outreach to their EPA and state agency contacts for their specific cleanup sites for further guidance in this unprecedented situation, and stay tuned for further announcements on the status of environmental cleanups in the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Copyright 2020.  Morgan, Lewis & Bockius LLP.  All Rights Reserved. 

 This article is provided as a general informational service and it should not be construed as imparting legal advice on any specific matter.


About the Authors

John McGahren is the Princeton litigation practice leader and deputy chair of the firm’s global environmental practice. John counsels clients on litigation, enforcement, and transactional matters. He prosecutes and defends citizen suits, Superfund and RCRA disputes, Clean Water and Air Act litigation, state law actions, and natural resource damage claims.

Stephanie R. Feingold represents clients in litigation and dispute resolution and provides environmental and regulatory counseling. Her work spans investigations, cost recovery and contribution actions, and enforcement actions brought by and against environmental agencies and government authorities, as well as private party actions.

Ariel Kapoano represents clients in complex environmental, toxic tort, contract, and consumer fraud litigation matters. She has experience in all aspects of litigation including factual investigation, discovery management, motions practice, and trial.

Jenna C. Ferraro is a part of the firm’s litigation team, which counsels clients and provides legal services in a wide range of areas, including general civil and commercial litigation, environmental law and toxic torts. Jenna’s experience includes many aspects of litigation, including discovery matters and motion practice.

How Virtual Reality and real-world tech can aid CBRNe training

Written by Steven Pike, Argon Electronics

Hands-on training in realistic environments is a cornerstone of CBRNe disaster preparedness, whether for the purpose of military exercises, first response or civilian operations.

The quality, frequency and consistency of CBRNe training has a substantial part to play in how easily personnel are able to acquire both the theory and the practice – and in how effectively they are able to continue to apply that knowledge in the long-term.

The impact and the authenticity of CBRNe training relies on three fundamental principles.

First is the importance of providing trainees with the opportunity to use actual equipment.

Second is enabling those personnel to apply their understanding of this equipment through exposure to realistic scenarios.

And thirdly is ensuring that the scenarios that are provided are conducted in relevant environments or locations.

Time restrictions, cost implications and safety considerations however, can all too often limit the opportunities for responders to practice, test and hone their crucial skills.

Training for radiation incidents

When an incident involves the presence of a high-radiation source or radioactive contamination, it can present some additional challenges.

At the same time, the equipment that radiological responders are required to use is also becoming increasingly sophisticated – and in particular when it comes to effective search and radionuclide identification (spectrometry.)

Many traditional radiation safety training methods can struggle to credibly recreate the complexities of real-life radiological events.

Field exercises can offer the promise of a high fidelity training experience, but sometimes fall short due to the minimal quantity of radiation source that can be safely used.

In the process, an understanding of essential physics can all too easily be diluted, misinterpreted or omitted altogether.

To ensure best preparedness, it is vital that emergency responders are provided with the opportunity to train against robust scenarios that take place in their home locations, that utilise their actual operating equipment and that enable them to put their protocols to the test.

Is virtual reality immersion the key?

Over the couple of decades there has been an increased interest in the potential applications of virtual reality (VR) and augmented reality (AR) in the enhancement of CBRN disaster preparedness.

In contrast to traditional user desktop interfaces, such as viewing a scenario on a computer screen, VR harnesses the power of computer technology to create a simulated environment that aims to recreate as many of the senses as possible.

Virtual reality enables the user to be placed directly “inside” the training experience, and once they are immersed in this artificial world, to be able to interact with a hyper realistic 3D environment.

Immersive multi-user VR training systems can be used to enhance situational awareness, to aid in the operation of equipment or to improve reaction times.

Some systems are designed to provide a pre-defined scenario (or scenarios) in order to train multiple users – for example when a large number of simulators are used in order to train military personnel for specific land, air or naval operations. Others allow the creation of self-defined scenarios that can be applied in multi-user training exercises.

Whilst VR creates an artificial environment in which the user can “inhabit”, augmented reality can be used to enhance live exercises in a real environment by superimposing computer-generated images over the user’s view of the real world.

But while virtual reality or augmented reality immersion exercises can offer many advantages, it is still extremely difficult to replicate the logistical, physiological and sensory realities of a taking part in a live incident.

In many cases too, virtual reality training must be restricted to specialised facilities. And perhaps most crucially, trainees miss the opportunity to practice with the actual detector equipment that they will be required to use in real incidents.

Maintaining operational readiness is vital, however it can often be difficult to provide personnel with access to the hands-on radiological training that they need.

Emergency training requires the mastery of a variety of skills and abilities – but placing trainees in real emergency situations, especially during the initial stages of training, is something that is best avoided.

What is of greater benefit is being able to provide personnel with expert guidance that takes place in a setting that mimics, as closely as possible, the challenges of real-life events.

What is required is a paradigm shift in the approach to radiological preparedness training.

If, for example, the potential applications of virtual technology can be merged with the hands-on application of real-world capabilities, then the possibilities could well be limitless.

With this goal in mind, Argon Electronics is excited to have joined forces with the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to explore the potential of the LLNL’s Radiation Field Training Simulator (RaFTS).


About the Author

Steven Pike is the Founder and Managing Director of Argon Electronics, a leader in the development and manufacture of Chemical, Biological, Radiological and Nuclear (CBRN) and hazardous material (HazMat) detector simulators. He is interested in liaising with CBRN professionals and detector manufacturers to develop training simulators as well as CBRN trainers and exercise planners to enhance their capability and improve the quality of CBRN and Hazmat training.

The Five Things you need to know about Incident Management and Reporting

Intelex, a company specializing in the development of EHS and quality software, recently published an insight report entitled “The Five Things you Need to Know about Incident Management and Reporting“.  The report provides information on the legal obligations to report serious injuries and fatalities, best practices for incident reporting and management, and how incident reporting and management can be linked to operational excellence.

In the introduction of the report, the cause of the Titanic disaster is discussed.  It report states that the average person would cite an iceberg as the cause of the ship’s sinking.  In contrast, a risk or safety manager would respond that the tragedy was caused by a series of events – management failures, poor-quality construction, employee errors/lack of training, poor planning, and either the failure to track incidents or the inability to analyze incident data in a meaningful way – that ended with the sinking of the ship.

EHS incidents can be painful for injured employees, the environment, and an organization’s bottom line, but incident management and reporting doesn’t have to be a pain point if done correctly.

Ontario: Waste Processing Company Fines Increased to $170,000 for Environmental Protection Act Violations

The Ontario Environment Ministry recently announced that an appeal court varied the sentence of an Ontario waste processing company and increased the fine from $140,000 to $170,000. The $30,000 fine increase reflected the anticipated cost of an embedded audit. The victim fine surcharge also increased from $35,000 to $42,500. The sentencing court also vacated the Order requirement that the company conduct the embedded audit.

The appeal court ruling stems from two separate matters in which an Ontario waste processing company, Quantex, was convicted of violations related to permitting waste to pass from its control without accurately completing a manifest, for transferring waste subject to land disposal restrictions without giving notice to the receiver, and for permitting the emission of an air contaminant to an extent that it may cause personal discomfort.  The offences occurred in 2016.

The company was originally convicted in 2018.  The Ontario Court of Justice granted the Crown’s appeal of the sentence that had been imposed on June 26, 2018 after a guilty plea, and increased the fine from $140,000 to $170,000, plus victim fine surcharge.

On June 26, 2018, Quantex was convicted of three violations and was fined a total of $140,000 plus a victim fine surcharge of $35,000 with 2 years to pay. The court also issued a probation order requiring the company to retain an independent auditor to conduct an embedded audit of some of the company’s waste management practices.

In December 2018, when the embedded audit was to begin, Quantex advised the Crown that it had sold the facility. It subsequently became apparent that the company had sold the facility prior to being sentenced in June 2018 and that Quantex had provided inaccurate information to the sentencing court. Therefore, the earlier sentencing had been conducted on the basis of inaccurate information.

At the time of the violations, Quantex Technologies Inc. operated a hazardous and liquid industrial waste transferring/processing site in Kitchener under ministry approval.  In the first matter, between November 2015 and January 2016, Quantex accepted hazardous wastes which were bulked together and shipped to another waste processing/transfer facility. Ministry inspection indicated that the waste manifest did not accurately reflect the waste classifications and that Quantex had not notified the receiver that some of the waste was subject to land disposal restrictions. As a consequence, the receiving facility was not aware that some of the waste had classifications that were not approved under the company’s ministry approval.

In the second matter, in August 2016, Quantex employees were transferring liquid industrial and/or hazardous wastes from storage totes into a tanker trailer on-site, and the truck’s vacuum pump and exhaust was being discharged into the air. During the transfer period, neighbours experienced burning and irritated eyes, a chlorine-like odour and difficulty breathing. The occurrence was reported to Quantex, which ceased the operation immediately.

The Environment ministry’s Investigations and Enforcement Branch investigated and laid charges resulting in three convictions.

Incident and Emergency Management Market – Growth, Trends and Forecast (2020 – 2025)

According to the findings in a recent market research report, the incident and emergency management market was valued at USD 97.73 billion in 2020 and is expected to reach USD 137.84 billion by 2025, with a CAGR of 6.03% during the forecast period (2020-2025). Emergency situations are highly unpredictable; it takes intense planning, time, and human resources to recover from crisis situations.

Emergency response systems are a vital component in speeding up the recovery process. Governments are increasingly trying to develop intelligent mitigation plans to minimize the response time and damage caused by both natural and man-made disasters.

Climate change is leading to increased frequency and severity of extreme weather events across regions. Centre for Research on the Epidemiology of Disasters reported that the amount of flood and storm catastrophes have risen by 7.4 % annually, in recent times.

Among end-users, a few, like educational institutions and hospitality firms, have a lower level of awareness and deployment of such software solutions and are mostly into recovery post-incident. Such low adoption rates are likely to affect the market revenues over and during the forecast period.

Scope of the Report

Incident and emergency management refer to a standardized approach, which prevents & manage incidents or humanitarian emergencies that have severe outcomes. It is involved in the integration and deployment of emergency systems and solutions at all government and non-government platforms.

Key Market Trends

Increase in Natural Disasters

As natural disasters increase in frequency and severity, their recovery costs are also significantly increasing year-by-year. Moreover, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), in 2017, the United States had the costliest year ever, when it comes to natural disasters.

The country experienced 16 different events, that resulted in more than a billion dollars in damage each, with a total price tag of USD 306.2 billion. Thus, it is vital that organizations work to save lives, protect property, and build communities back stronger after disaster strikes.

In disaster recovery solutions, it is of paramount importance to have a fast, reliable, and secure form of communication. Communication requirements in a disaster recovery can benefit from the flexibility, versatility, and quick deployment of satellite networks, enabling responders to coordinate first response activities and command, control and communicate urgent information, quickly and efficiently.

Asia-Pacific is the Fastest Growing Region

Asia-Pacific is the fastest growing region, due to the growing disaster management, terrorist and cyber attacks in the region. With enhanced geographical zones and a high client base, the region is expected to exhibit strong growth in the studied market.

The region is the world’s most disaster-prone region, so disaster management is a significant priority. Over the years, most countries in the region have established national disaster management authorities and systems that are increasingly adopting the latest technologies and solutions.

Also due to an increase in the government expenditure on emergency and disaster management systems to safeguard people from disasters, the region has been witnessing a rise in the studied market software.

In April 2018, the Emergency Operations (EMO) unit at WHE/SEARO organized the WHO South-East Asia Regional and Country Offices Emergency Readiness training in India.

Competitive Landscape

The existing players in the market, like IBM, NEC Corporation, and Honeywell among others are well penetrated and possess successful strategies to come up with new and differentiated products that would increase opportunities for them. Additionally, brand identity has a major influence in this market, as strong brands are considered to be synonymous with good performance.

However, with new companies supported and funded, like governments and others(for instance, TMC Technologies), the competition is expected to grow, overall, the competitive rivalry in the market is moderate and increasing. Some of the key players in Incident and Emergency Management Market are Hexagon AB, NEC Corporation.

Some of the key recent development in Incident and Emergency Management Market are as follows:

The Isle of Wight NHS Trust’s Ambulance Service (IoW Ambulance Service) has implemented Hexagon’s intergraph computer-aided dispatch (I/CAD) system. This industry-leading incident management solution will support the island’s emergency and non-emergency call handling and dispatch needs, enhance collaboration with neighboring services, and reduce costs.

NEC Corporation announced the supply of wide-area disaster prevention system to the Meteorological, Climatological and Geophysical Agency of the Republic of Indonesia (Indonesia). This wide-area disaster prevention system will collect seismic intensity and waveform information obtained from seismometers newly installed at 93 sites across Indonesia.