Canada: COVID-19 – Impact On Environmental Compliance And Due Diligence

Written by Bryan J. Buttigieg, Miller Thomson LLP
As these strange times continue to evolve, it is important to ensure that all companies whose operations raise environmental compliance issues try to think through and plan for what might happen in the coming weeks and perhaps months. In particular, both self-imposed and regulatory quarantine protocols may have a significant impact on critical staff levels at a facility. While we are all deep into implementation of directives about working from home when we can, there are, of course, a number of essential jobs that require physical presence for a plant to operate properly.

Despite all the dramatic changes going on in our lives, all conditions of operating permits such as Environmental Compliance Approvals remain in full force, and all obligations such as spill prevention, spill remediation, spill reporting and regular compliance reporting continue to apply. It is never an excuse to say something happened due to a staff shortage. If there are insufficient resources to conduct an operation in full compliance of environmental obligations, there is an obligation to revise operating plans including if necessary, reducing production levels, rather than continuing business as usual in the expectation that regulators will somehow turn a blind eye to non-compliance.

Care needs to be taken to ensure that all safety and regulatory requirements continue to be met. Careful thought should be given as to what minimum staffing would be needed to keep a facility operating safely and in full compliance. Consideration will have to be given as to whether production changes are needed to reduce the risk of an undesirable incident due to unexpected staff shortages. There may, in turn, be impacts on supply chain and customer obligations. While cross border closures are not supposed to impact the movement of goods, what happens if border screening is in place and a driver with essential supplies is refused crossing? Consider communicating regularly with any spill response contractors who are on retainer or may be needed: Are they adequately staffed? Will they be in a position to respond if needed? If not, what other steps need to be taken? We are at the stage where these are becoming foreseeable events and as such planning is required in order to ensure as orderly and safe a transition as possible.

Consider creating a dedicated COVID-19 Environmental Compliance Team whose main purpose is to review all applicable environmental obligations and try to anticipate internal compliance risks in the event of reduced staffing levels. Ensure that if employees are asked to step into temporary roles due to the absence of others, proper training is given on all obligations including spill detection and reporting. Be prepared to make quick decisions and make changes as the situation evolves. Communicate decisions to all affected clearly and concisely and ensure there is a channel for employee feedback and comments as quite often, those in the field will be the first to identify practical difficulties with any changes to long standing work practices.

Proactive communication with the regulators might be a useful step to consider. While many government employees are also working from home, they continue to enforce regulatory obligations. Proactive communication with a local abatement officer might be a useful way to ensure there is awareness of any special steps you are taking and an ongoing dialogue to ensure any concerns raised by the regulator are addressed.

Similarly, industry organizations might have put some thought into protocols applicable to all members that would assist you in ensuring you are exercising the appropriate level of diligence. Consider the need for community communications with neighbours or neighbourhood groups at this stage.

As the current situation continues to develop, vigilance to ensure ongoing environmental compliance is going to remain of utmost importance in order to minimise any additional disruption to daily business operations beyond that being caused by events that cannot be controlled or foreseen.

The content of this article is intended to provide a general guide to the subject matter. Specialist advice should be sought about your specific circumstances.


Bryan Buttigieg is recognized as one of the leading practitioners of environmental law in Canada and is certified by the Law Society of Ontario as a specialist in Environmental Law. His practice includes a combination of litigation and transactional advice involving civil litigation and regulatory defence representation in environmental and occupational health and safety matters.