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Repeal of the Ontario Toxics Reduction Act, 2009

The Ontario government recently announced that it will repeal the Ontario Toxics Reduction Act, 2009 and revoke its associated regulations on December 31, 2021.

The purpose of the Toxics Reduction Act, 2009 is to prevent pollution by reducing the use and creation of toxic substances and inform Ontarians about those substances. Under the statute, industry is required to develop toxic reduction plans, and report publicly each year. Implementation of plans is voluntary.

The decision to revoke the statute was reached by the government following consultation with stakeholders and in keeping with the government’s Ontario Open for Business Action Plan. During the consultation period, the government received a total of 431 comments from various stakeholders.

The reason given by the government for the planned repeal was that the Toxics Reduction Program has not achieved meaningful reductions. The government stated that results indicate an overall reduction of only 0.04% of substances used, created and released for all regulated facilities.

This graph illustrates the number of substances as reported to the Ontario Environment Ministry under the Toxics Reduction Regulations by facilities for 2013

In repealing the Toxics Reduction Act, 2009 in 2021, the Ontario government believes that it will eliminate duplication and overlap with the federal government’s Chemicals Management Plan program under the Canadian Environmental Protection Act 1999.

Regulated facilities in Ontario still have to maintain reporting under the Toxics Reduction Act, 2009 and its associated regulations until December 31, 2021.

Existing facilities with current plans for substances that meet reporting thresholds are required to report annually on:

  • the amounts of those substances used, created, contained in product; and
  • the progress in reducing those substances.

Until the repeal, facilities can continue to voluntarily amend their plans. Summaries of amended plans must also be made available to the public.

Quebec to Track Contaminated Soil Movement in Real Time

The Quebec Government recently announcement that it will adopt the regulation that will include the implementation of a system in which the movement of contaminated soil will be tracked in real time. Under the tracking system, the site owner, project manager, regulator, carrier, and receiving site, and other stakeholders will be able to know where contaminated soil is being shipped from, where it’s going, its quantity and what routes will be used to transport it.

Contaminated soil will be tracked in real time, starting from its excavation, through a global positioning system. The system, Traces Québec, is already in place in Montreal as part of a pilot project launched last March.

Traces Quebec , an initiative of Réseau Environnement in partnership with WikiNet , offers the first integrated traceability solution for contaminated soils in Quebec. Performing on a web platform, the Traces Quebec traceability system allows contaminated soil owners to follow in real time the movement of their materials and to have an encrypted, confidential and archived trace of the displaced materials. In an era of transparency and eco-citizenship, Traces Québec allows contaminated soil owners to demonstrate beyond any doubt their exemplary management of these materials.

Combining the Internet of Things (IoT) and artificial intelligence, Traces Quebec is an independent application that allows complete traceability of materials to their destination. Transactions are encrypted, unalterable and private, and compatible with smart phones and conventional GPS fleet systems.

With a system such as Traces Québec, all players in the field in Quebec will benefit from increased traceability and responsible management of transported excavated materials, particularly treatment, transfer stations and landfills, which will increase the volume materials shipped to their sites. Owners of these materials concerned with their good management, including municipalities, will also come out winners and can easily testify to their good management. Management in compliance with the laws and regulations concerning the protection of the environment; this is the essential contribution of Traces Québec.

The Quebec government also intends to increase he number of inspections on receiving sites. Furthermore, fines will be increased for those taking part in illegal dumping — from $350 to $3 million depending on the gravity of the offence, the type of soil and if they are repeat offenders, among other criteria.

How the GPS tracking system works

Amendments to the Canada Shipping Act, 2001 and Marine Liability Act

by Joanna Dawson, McMillan LLP

On December 13, 2018, Bill C-86, A second Act to implement certain provisions of the budget tabled in Parliament on February 27, 2018 and other measures, otherwise known as the Budget Implementation Act was given royal assent.  This Bill, which was first introduced on October 29, 2018, predominantly pertains to amendments of budget-related legislation, but also proposes significant amendments to both the Canada Shipping Act, 2001(“CSA”) and the Marine Liability Act (“MLA”). The amendments to the CSA were introduced to allow the federal government to regulate for environmental reasons and specifically “to deliver on commitments made under the Oceans Protection Plan to enable the Government to respond to marine pollution incidents faster and more effectively, and to better protect marine ecosystems and habitats”. The amendments provide significant new powers and authority that potentially change the marine safety and environmental protection framework in Canada.

Canada Shipping Act, 2001

With a focus on marine environmental protection, environmental response, enhanced enforcement and support for marine research, the amendments to the CSA include the following:

  • The amended Section 10(1)(c) sets out that the Minister of Transport or the Minister of Fisheries and Oceans may enter into agreements or arrangements respecting the administration or enforcement of any provision of this Act or the regulations and authorize any person or organization – including a provincial government, local authority, council or other entity authorized to act on behalf of an Indigenous group – with whom or which an agreement or arrangement is entered into to exercise the powers or perform the duties and functions under this Act that are specified in the agreement or arrangement.
  • The new Section 10(2.1) provides that the Minister of Transport may exempt any person or vessel or class of persons or vessels from any provisions of the CSA or the regulations if the exemption would allow the undertaking of research and development to enhance marine safety or environmental protection.
  • The new Section 10.1 provides that the Minister of Transport may make an interim order if he or she believes that immediate action is required to deal with a direct or indirect risk to marine safety or to the marine environment. Such interim order has effect from the time that it is made and remains in effect for a period one year, or any shorter period that may be specified in the interim order.  However, the interim order may be extended by the Governor in Council for a period of no more than two years after the end of the applicable period.
  • The new Section 35.1 provides that the Governor in Council may, on the recommendation of the Minister of Transport, make regulations respecting the protection of the marine environment from the impacts of navigation and shipping activities, including regulations with respect to, among other things:
    • design, construction, manufacture and maintenance of vessels or classes of vessels and inspections and testing thereof;
    • specifying the machinery, equipment and supplies that are required or prohibited on board vessels or classes of vessels;
    • design, construction, manufacture, maintenance, storage, inspection, testing, approval, arrangement and use of the machinery, equipment and supplies of vessels or classes of vessels;
    • regulating or prohibiting the operation, navigation, anchoring, mooring or berthing of vessels or classes of vessels; and
    • regulating or prohibiting the loading or unloading of a vessel or a class of vessels.
  • New penalties for non-compliance by the amendment in Section 40.1 which provides for a fine of not more than $1,000,000 or to imprisonment for a term of not more than 18 months, or both.
  • The amendments to Sections 168.3, 175(2) and 180(1) allow the Minister or the Minister of Fisheries and Oceans who believes on reasonable grounds that a vessel or an oil handling facility has discharged, is discharging or may discharge a pollutant, to take measures that he or she considers necessary to repair, remedy, minimize or prevent pollution damage from the vessel or oil handling facility.

Marine Liability Act

With a focus on “modernizing Canada’s Ship-Source Oil Pollution Fund”, the amendments to the MLA include the following:

  • The amended Section 101(1.1) provides that the Ship-source Oil Pollution Fund is liable for the costs and expenses incurred by the Minister of Fisheries and Oceans or any other person in respect of measures taken under subsection 180(1) of the Canada Shipping Act, 2001 with respect to oil, or for loss or damage caused by those measures, for which neither the owner of a ship, the International Fund nor the Supplementary Fund is liable by reason of the fact that the occurrence or series of occurrences for which those costs and expenses were incurred did not create a grave and imminent threat of causing oil pollution damage.
  • The addition of Section 114.1 imposes levies on receivers and exporters of oil to be used to replenish the Ship-source Oil Pollution fund when depleted.
  • New penalties for non-compliance by the addition of Section 130.01 which provides for a fine of $50,000 per individual and, in the case of any other person, $250,000.

Going Forward

While these amendments are intended to improve maritime safety and environmental protection, it is not yet clear as to the impact these provisions will have upon the current Canadian marine and environmental framework.  It seems that some of the provisions are ambiguous or will be challenging to apply. Without further guidance on how these new measures will be implemented, and clarity on who has the regulatory authority to enforce or take action provided thereunder, the uncertainty will ultimately lead to litigation with the courts left to determine the appropriate outcome.  It will be interesting to see how the amendments to the CSA and the MLA will affect and bring about change to the maritime industry.


A cautionary note: The foregoing provides only an overview and does not constitute legal advice. Readers are cautioned against making any decisions based on this material alone. Rather, specific legal advice should be obtained.

This article is republished with the permission of the author. It was first posted on the McMillan LLP website.

About the Author

Joanna is a senior associate in the Business Law Group and the Transportation Group in the firm’s Vancouver office.  She practices in the areas of corporate, commercial and maritime law. Joanna routinely advises companies in the marine industry and a wide range of other industries on general corporate and commercial matters, including mergers and acquisitions, sales and purchases of businesses and marine assets, business structuring and organization, corporate restructuring and reorganization, and preparation and negotiation of agreements and contracts.

Joanna’s clients turn to her for day-to-day advice on their company operations and appreciate her practical and business-minded legal advice. She brings to her practice a depth of knowledge in the marine and transportation sectors acquired through her experience in working with ferry operators, shippers, ship owners and charter parties, and ship builders, locally and internationally.

Ontario Government’s Plans on the Environment: Impact on Brownfield Development

The Ontario Government released a Made-in-Ontario Environment Plan in late 2018 in partially in response to criticism that it had no plan for addressing climate change after it cancelled the greenhouse gas (GHG) cap-and-trade program of the previous government. The plan includes several proposals that should be on interest to persons involved in brownfield development.

The Ontario government 52-page document (entitled (“Preserving and Protecting or Environment for Future Generations: A Made-in-Ontario Environment Plan”) commits to protecting air, lakes and rivers; addressing climate change; reducing litter and waste; and conserving land and greenspace. Many of the measures establish a direction but the details will have to be further developed.

With respect to contaminated sites and brownfields, the document talks about the “polluter pay”, and engaging environment business and entrepreneurs. However, it is lacking in details.

Generating GHG from Brownfield Projects

The Ontario government’s proposed replaced to the scraped GHG trading regulation is the Creating the Ontario Carbon Fund. While details are to be worked out, the plan proposes to use $400M of government funding with the aim of leveraging additional private funds on a 4:1 basis to support “investment in clean technologies that are commercially viable.” The fund will also support a “reverse auction” model whereby emitters will “bid” for funding to support their GHG reduction projects.

There is a possibility that developers involved in brownfield redevelopment could be eligible for government funding depending on if clean technologies are employed in the clean-up and GHG reductions are realized versus the traditional dig-and-dump approach to site clean-up.

2010 Photo of the former Kitchener Frame Building (Photo Credit: Philip Walker/Record staff)

Streamlined environmental approvals

The Made-in-Ontario Plan notes that environmental approvals should be prioritized for businesses that want to implement low GHG technology or approaches. This is the latest promise from the Ontario government to speed up the approval process.

Seasoned veterans in the environmental sector remember similar promises made the government on fast-tracked approvals. There are still those who remember the Environmental Leaders Program in which speedy approval was promised to companies that committed to above-compliance environmental activities and targets.

With respect to this latest promise on speedy approvals, the document is silent on if “speed” will be applied to the Environment Ministry review of site specific risk assessments (SSRA’s) that are submitted to the Ontario Environment Ministry for approval instead of following the generic clean-up standards.

Measures to promote healthy, clean soils

The Made-in-Ontario Plan plan commits to “revise the brownfield regulation and record of site condition guide” as part of a basket of measures to promote clean soils. Again, the document is lacking in details.

The previous Ontario government had proposed reasonable changes to the Record of Site Condition Regulations (O. Reg. 153/04). One important aspect of the proposed change is related to road-salt impacts on a property. As the regulations currently stands, road salt-related impacts can only be exempted from clean-up if it can be proven they are related to the application of de-icing salts on a public highway. Under the proposed changes to the regulations, the exemption will include road salt applied to a property ‘for the purpose of traffic and pedestrian safety under conditions of snow/ice’. This one change, if implemented, would save thousands of dollars in clean-up costs at many sites undergoing redevelopment in Ontario.

The previous Ontario government had also proposed a much-need excess soil regulation. There has been extensive consultation on the proposed regulation over a five-year period. If implemented, the regulation would address the gaps surrounding the ability for enforcement on mismanagement of excess soils in Ontario. It would also open up the opportunity for beneficial reuse of excess soil.

Setting New Legal Standards And Timelines: Alberta’s Remediation Regulation

Article by Alan Harvie, Norton Rose Fullbright Canada LLP

Alberta Environment and Parks (AEP) has amended regulations that will require all contamination caused by spills that are reported to regulators after January 1, 2019 to be delineated and assessed as soon as possible through a Phase 2 environmental site assessment that meets AEP’s standards and that is then either remediated within two years or subject to an approved remedial action plan with an approved final clean-up date. These are significant departures from the current requirements.

On June 1, 2018 the Remediation Certificate Amendment Regulation was passed into law under the Environmental Protection and Enhancement Act (EPEA). It amends the existing Remediation Certificate Regulation in a number of important ways, including changing the name to the Remediation Regulation.

Groundwater monitoring wells

The Remediation Regulation will be administered by the Alberta Energy Regulator (AER) for contamination at upstream oil and gas sites, such as wells, pipelines and facilities, and by AEP for all other sites.

Under the EPEA, a person responsible for the release of a substance into the environment that causes or has the potential to cause an adverse effect is under a legal duty, as soon as they know about the release or ought to have known about it, to report it to regulators. They must also, as soon as they know or ought to have known about the release, take all reasonable measures to repair, remedy and confine the effects of the substance, remove or otherwise dispose of the substance in such a manner as to effect maximum protection to human life, health and the environment and restore the environment to a condition satisfactory to the regulators.

Although persons have always been legally required, under the EPEA, to clean up spills, historically there was no legal requirement as to how a person was to assess contamination or any specific time limit as to how long a person could take to remediate the spill as required by the EPEA. This has now changed.

New timelines

The Remediation Regulation requires that a person responsible for a spill that is reported after January 1, 2019 must:

  • As soon as possible, either remediate the spill to meet the criteria set out in the Alberta Tier 1 and 2 Soil and Groundwater Remediation Guidelines and submit a report to the regulators about the remediation or undertake a Phase 2 environment site assessment of the site that meets the requirements of AEP’s Environmental Site Assessment Standard.
  • If the site cannot be remediated to the satisfaction of the regulators within two years, then the person responsible for the spill must submit a remedial action plan (RAP) that complies with AEP’s Alberta Tier 1 and Tier Soil and Groundwater Remediation GuidelinesEnvironmental Site Assessment StandardExposure Control Guide and Risk Management Plan Guide.
  • The RAP must include a period of time for completion of the remediation that is acceptable to the regulators.
  • The person responsible must take the remedial measures set out in the approved RAP by such time.

New legal standards

The Remediation Regulation previously incorporated into law the requirements to use the Tier 1 and 2 Soil and Groundwater Remediation Guidelines for obtaining a remediation certificate under the EPEA. It now requires that the Guidelines also be followed for assessing contaminated sites and therefore eliminates some historical practices in which persons responsible for spills used other clean-up guidelines or criteria.

The Remediation Regulation also requires the use of the Environmental Site Assessment Standard. The Standard sets out how contamination is to be vertically and horizontally delineated and assessed. The Remediation Regulation requires that this work be done within two years.

If the spill cannot be remediated within two years, then a RAP which meets the Exposure Control Guide and the Risk Management Plan Guide, and which has been approved by the regulators, must be in effect at the end of the two-year period. For some large contaminated sites, it may be challenging to fully delineate the contamination, develop a RAP and have the regulators approve it within two years. Furthermore, the clean-up under the RAP must have a stated end point.

Abandoned oil well equipment

These changes diverge from historical practices where, in some cases, contamination delineation has taken several or more years, and remedial actions, if any, have not been well planned and have had no fixed end point.

Implications

The implications of the Remediation Regulation for persons responsible for contamination are such that they will no longer be able to ignore or may only be able to slowly proceed with assessing contamination or simply monitor it over the long term. Concrete steps must now be taken according to set time periods and such steps must comply with AEP’s guidelines and standards.

Next steps

As mentioned, the new requirements to delineate and remediate a site apply only to spills reported on or after January 1, 2019. Before then, AEP is expected to release further guidance, host stakeholder workshops and potentially amend the Remediation Regulation.

 

The content of this article is intended to provide a general guide to the subject matter. Specialist advice should be sought about your specific circumstances.

This article was first published on the Norton Rose Fulbright Canada LLP Website.

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About the Author

Alan Harvie is a senior partner at Norton Rose Fulbright Canada LLP and practices out of the Calgary office.  He has practised energy and environmental/regulatory law since 1989 and regularly deals with commercial, operational, environmental and regulatory issues, especially for the upstream oil and gas, energy, waste disposal and chemical industries. He is a member of our energy and environmental departments.

Mr. Harvie also has significant legal experience in acting for the oil and gas industry in commercial transactions and regulatory matters, including enforcement proceedings, common carrier and processor applications, forced poolings, downspacings and holdings, rateable take, and contested facility, well and pipeline applications. He has also dealt extensively with commercial, environmental and regulatory issues concerning thermal and renewable power plants, electrical transmission and distribution lines, tourism and recreation projects, forestry, mining, agriculture, commercial real estate, industrial facilities, sewage plants, hazardous waste landfills and treatment facilities, transportation of dangerous goods and water storage reservoirs.

Mr. Harvie regularly advises clients about environmental assessments and permitting, spill response, enforcement proceedings, contaminated site remediation, facility decommissioning and reclamation, chemical compliance (DSL, NDSL, MSDS and HMIRC), nuclear licensing, crude-by-rail projects and product recycling and stewardship requirements.

 

MOECC Releases Notice of Updated Excess Soil Management Proposal

By David Nguyen – Staff Writer

The Ontario Ministry of Environment and Climate Change (MOECC) recently posted notice on the Environmental Bill of Rights Environmental Registry of the regulatory changes to the management of excess soil (Excess Soil Management Regulatory Proposal, ERO# 013-2774). Excess soil is soil that has been dug up, such as during excavation activities, and cannot be reused at its original site and must be moved off site.  There is much controversy in the Province of Ontario and other provinces concerning the management of excess soil as there are claims and growing evidence that some companies mix clean soil with contaminated soil, some companies dispose of contaminated soil as clean soil, and other questionable practices.

The MOECC proposal clarifies where soils can be reused based on the soil characterization and aims to reduce greenhouse gasses from the transportation of soil by encouraging local reuse. The proposal also clarifies that the project leader is responsible for the management and relocation of the excess soil generated during a project to ensure proper characterization and relocation. Minor amendments to O.Reg. 153/04 and to O. Reg. 347 are also proposed.

The current proposal incorporates responses and comments from the previous proposal as well as from engagement with stakeholders and Indigenous communities. Changes from the previous proposal include:

  • A revised approach to waste designation
  • Reduced regulatory complexity and some details moved to guidance
  • A two to three years transition time for key regulations
  • Several O. Reg. 153/04 amendments to come into effect sooner
  • More flexibility for reuse through new reuse standards and a Beneficial Reuse Assessment Tool to develop site specific standards

This proposal is part of the MOECC’s response to the commitments outlined in Ontario’s Excess Soil Management Policy Framework. Other actions of the framework include developing priority education, outreach and training initiatives to support implementation.

The specific regulations and proposals provided for comments are summarized below:

  • A new proposed On-Site and Excess Soil Management Regulation
    • Excess soil would be designated as waste when it leaves the project area unless it is reused in accordance with the rules set out in this regulation.
    • If designated waste, the regulation would clarify when an ECA is not required.
    • Hauling of excess soil would generally not need an ECA, but is still subject to certain rules, such as maintaining records.
    • Project leaders may use temporary soil storage sites without an ECA as long as certain conditions are met.
    • Unless exempted, a project leader is responsible for preparing an Excess Soil Management Plan (ESMP), which involves determining contaminant concentrations on the soil, finding appropriate receiving sites, develop a tracking system and record keeping requirements.
    • Key information from the ESMP would be registered on a public registry. A qualified person (QP) would need to prepare or supervise the ESMP.
    • The regulation would be phased in over two to three years.
  • Amendments to O. Reg. 153/04
    • Align the requirements for soil being taken to Record of Site Condition (RSC) or phase two properties with the new rules for excess soil proposed in the On-Site and Excess Soil Management Regulation.
    • Resolve delineation challenges experienced at properties going through the Risk Assessment process.
    • Remove Record of Site Condition triggers for low risk projects.
    • Provide flexibility for meeting contamination standards where exceedances are cause by substances used for ice and snow safety, discharges of treated drinking water, and presence of fill that matches local background levels.
  • Amendments to O. Reg. 347
    • Clarify that excess soil is no longer part of the definition of “inert fill.”
    • Clarify operational requirements to support exemptions from ECA requirements for excess soil related activities.
  • Proposal of Rules for On-site and Excess Soil Management
    • A proposed document to be adopted by reference in the On-Site and Excess Soil Management Regulation
    • Specifies ESMP contents, including an assessment of past uses, sampling and analysis plan, excess soil characterization, requirements for excess soil tracking systems, a destination assessment and identification, and declarations required of the project leader and qualified person, and applicable soil quality standards and related rules.
  • The proposed “Beneficial Reuse Assessment Tool” (BRAT)
    • An alternative rules that aim to promote greater reuse of excess soil and the protection of human health and the environment
    • Allows a QP to generate site specific standards using a spreadsheet model

Comments can be made on the proposal up to June 15, 2018 on the Environmental Registry of Ontario proposal site or by mail.