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Canada makes a significant coastal restoration fund investment

The Government of Canada recently announced funding for projects under its Ocean Protection Plan.  The financial contribution by the government is $7 million over 5 years for projects to help restore coastal habitats in Nova Scotia and the Arctic.

Four organizations will receive together over $7 million over 5 years for projects to help restore coastal habitats in Nova Scotia and in the Arctic.

The Clean Foundation is receiving $2,408,947 in project funding towards restoring tidal wetlands in the Northumberland Strait area of Nova Scotia and building community capacity to identify, protect, and rehabilitate this habitat. To do this, the Clean Foundation will: 1) identify, restore and monitor tidal wetland sites in the various areas of the Northumberland Strait, and; 2) work wit

Bay of Fundy

h multi-sectoral partners, including Indigenous organizations and communities to engage, educate and build capacity to protect and restore this important habitat.

Saint Mary’s University, Department of Geography & Environmental Studies is receiving $1,830,594 in project funding towards restoring tidal wetland habitat through the realignment of dyke infrastructure at several sites bordering the Bay of Fundy. It will include building regional capacity for effective scientific, technical and procedural components of managed realignment and marshland restoration projects that can be applied to future sites throughout Atlantic region.

The Maritime Aboriginal Peoples Council is receiving $1,259,304 in project funding towards identifying areas for rehabilitation and developing a restoration plan focused on addressing habitat restoration and impediments to fish passage, such as improving the efficiency of tidal-gate or aboiteaux structures. Four of the five watersheds within the project scope are identified as critical habitat for the endangered inner Bay of Fundy (IBoF) Atlantic Salmon.

Dalhousie University will receive $1,985,500 to determine coastal restoration priorities across Nunavut, and restore three priority sites, including a low flow barrier to fish passage located on the Nilaqtarvik River near the community of Clyde River. The study will address data deficiencies in coastal habitat health, habitat fragmentation, fish health, traditional knowledge and science through community consultation and feasibility studies. Researchers will also work in partnership with the Government of Nunavut, hamlets and Hunter and Trapper organizations in all 25 Nunavut communities to develop coastal restoration plans on a case-by-case basis.

Community of Clyde River, Nunavut

The Coast Restoration Fund, started in 2017, is a $75 commitment by the Canadian to help rehabilitate vulnerable coastlines and protect marine life and ecosystems. The Coastal Restoration Fund, under the responsibility of Fisheries and Oceans Canada, supports projects that contribute to coastal restoration on all of Canada’s coasts, with preference given to projects that are multiyear and involve a broad number of partners, including Indigenous groups.  The Coast Restoration Fund is part of a larger  Oceans Protection Plan.  Under the Oceans Protection Plan, the Canadian Government has committed $1.5 billion to coastal restoration.

 

Canadian Government to spend $80 million to Study Oil Spills

Building on the announcements of $3 million in funding for R&D on oil spill response technology, the federal government recently announced it is spending $80-million on oil spill research on preventing spills as well as their effect on the marine environment.

There will be $45.5-million set up for a research program that will foster collaboration among researchers in Canada and around the world, with $10-million a year to bring scientists together to study how oil spills behave, how to clean and contain them and how to minimize environmental damage. 

The Centre for Offshore Oil, Gas and Energy Research in Halifax will also get some of the $16.8-million in funding for new scientists and specialized equipment.  It will support oil spill research to better understand how oil degrades in different conditions.

Another $17.7-million will be used to fund research and development of enhanced ocean computer models of winds, waves and currents to allow responders to better track spills.

The funds are part of the $1.5-billion Oceans Protection Plan, which is aimed at developing a marine safety system.