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New Cleantech innovations reduce emissions from vehicles and suppress dust at industrial sites

dynaCERT Inc and H2 Tek have taken home the $5,000 top prize at the Mining Cleantech Challenge in Denver, the Colorado Cleantech Industries Association (CCIA) has reported.

The two companies’ technology were chosen by mining executives and investors in the industry as the best among a competitive field of 12 total companies representing the US, Canada and Israel, the CCIA said. An international team of judges reviewed and voted on the winners, the CCIA said.

dynaCERT’s HydraGEN™ turns distilled water into H2 and O2 gases on-demand and introduces these gases directly to diesel engines’ air intakes. H2 Tek Vice President of Sales and Marketing, David Van Klaveren, said: “Our technology, HydraGEN can actually improve significantly those carbon emissions, reduce them and, along the way, pay for the capital cost of all this through fuel efficiency savings.

“We can’t ignore the fact that clean technology is an important part of our responsibility as participants and members of this industry, the mining industry,” he said. “I think it’s remarkable that an association considers this a priority: bringing together companies that have innovation for an extremely important cause.”

Hydrocarbons and CO2 are reduced due to the absence of carbon in hydrogen fuel and also due to better combustion of diesel fuel with the aid of hydrogen which has a higher flame speed, dynaCERT said.

“Although CO values for neat diesel operation is relatively lower, by inducting H2 & O2 into diesel the CO amount is further reduced,” dynaCERT said. dynaCERT has created partnerships to perfect a technology that would deliver on the promising findings with H2 & O2 injection. Not only have we developed patent-pending technology, we have completed testing and have validated that our technology works.”

Some of the features delivered through the technology, dynaCERT said:

  • “Our patent-pending electrolysis system and Smart ECM provides a reliable and adjustable delivery of H2 & O2 concentrations. Not all engines are the same and having the optimal ratio of gases provides increased benefits;
  • “Our technology is scalable allowing use with Class 6-8 on-road vehicles and transition to applications with rail, marine, off-road and power generation;
  • “Our technology is leading edge and provides solutions without drawing excessive power to perform the task;
  • “It is designed to work with OEM manufacturer’s and compliment technological improvements.”

Earth Alive Clean Technologies

Second place in the cleantech competition went to Earth Alive Clean Technologies, a microbial dust control technology that is non-hazmat, 100% organic and has biodegradable properties.

Earth Alive offers EA1TM dust suppressant and RapidAll cleaner to remove dust, dirt and any other contaminant in a natural way. EA1 eliminates 90% of dust on work sites.

EA1TM reduces dust through the use of microbial technology to keep dust particles in the soil. EA1TM reintroduces natural microbial strains compounds already found in nature into the ground to create conditions that prevent dust from becoming airborne, while helping to retain soil moisture. Microbial spores are activated after application and thrive in the soil binding soil particles and creating a firm and resistant layer preventing dust emission.

Using Block Chain Technology to Track Hazardous Materials

There is increasing focus on the utilization of Blockchain technology to track hazardous materials and hazardous waste. Blockchain technology allows for a system where records can be stored, facts can be verified by anyone, and security is guaranteed. The software that would power such a system is called a “blockchain”.

Blockchains store information across a network of computers making them both decentralized and distributed. This means no central company or person owns the system and that everyone can use it and help run it. This makes it extremely difficult for any one person to take down the network or corrupt it.

In essence, a blockchain is a super-secure digital ledger, where transactions records are kept chronologically and publicly. According to experts, the technology would also make it easier to track shipments of hazardous materials and waste. It could even help with regulatory compliance.


The management of hazardous materials/waste through blockchain would result in more open and coordinated movement among generators, transporters, users, and and recyclers. It would also enable the government to more efficiently and openly regulate hazardous materials movement and hazardous waste management. The imbalance between the organized and unorganized sectors would shrink and lead to increased transparency throughout the process.

Tracking Waste Using Blockchain Technology

The technology that powers cryptocurrencies like bitcoin are slowly making way into hazardous materials transportation and hazardous waste management.

As reported in Hacker Noon, Jody Cleworth, the CEO of Marine Transport International said, “The shipping of recovered materials is necessarily heavily regulated, and we’ve had a real impact in simplifying the process while remaining compliant.” Marine Transport International is a New Jersey-based freight forwarder. The company just completed a successful blockchain pilot. This pilot created a common tracking system linking up recycling suppliers, port operators, and ocean carriers.

Phil Rudoni, Chief Tech Officer at Rubicon said that “A big issue the waste industry faces is the lack of accountability for the end destination of recycled material. Rubicon is an Atlanta-based tech startup that provides cloud-based recycling and waste services.

It has always been a challenge to track hazardous materials and waste. With blockchain, it is believed that it would be much easier. It wouldn’t be so difficult to design a system where hazardous materials could be tagged with scannable Quick Response or QR-Codes (two-dimensional barcode) and then tracked at each step of the recycling supply chain. The tracking could be done by the generator, regulator, receiver, the general public, and any other interested person.

Examples of blockchain technology in waste management

The Several waste initiatives have seen the potential of incorporating blockchain technology. One if such initiative is the Plastic Bank, a global recycling venture founded in Vancouver by David Katz and Shaun Frankson. Its main aim is to reduce plastic waste in developing countries like Haiti, Peru, Colombia, and the Philippines. It has plans to extend it’s territory this year.

The Plastic Bank initiative pays people who bring plastic rubbish to bank recycling centers. One payment option is the use of blockchain-secured digital tokens. The tokens can be used to purchase things like food or phone-charging units in any store using the Plastic Bank app.

The plastic brought into the Plastic Bank is bought by companies and recycled into new consumer products. This system is more attractive because blockchain’s transparency means all parties can see and monitor where their effort and/or investment goes.

Researchers Develop new method to detect hazardous solvents in water and soil

A Purdue University team, led by Joe Sinfield, an associate professor in Purdue’s Lyles School of Civil Engineering, and involving former Purdue researcher Chike Monwuba, has developed a new method to detect the presence of these hazardous solvents in water and soil. The method offers the potential to enhance monitoring operations and improve the efficiency of remediation efforts.

“Our method is accurate, quick and can detect very low concentrations of the target contaminants,” said Sinfield, who also serves as the director of Purdue’s College of Engineering Innovation and Leadership Studies Program.

The Purdue team had initially focused on using Raman spectroscopy to directly detect chlorinated solvents. In this approach, a laser is used to examine a sample and the scattered light is observed to determine its chemical makeup.


The different fundamental light processes during material interaction

“Traditionally, one would look for specific frequencies of scattered light that are indicative of the presence of the chemical of interest,” Sinfield said. “However, after conducting several broad spectral studies of the target compounds in simulated field samples, our team noticed that the light scattered by the water itself was affected by the presence of the chlorinated solvents—in fact more so than the light scattered by the molecules of the target chemical.”

This observation led to the development of a sensing mechanism that is nearly 10 times more sensitive than conventional approaches involving direct observation of the solvents themselves.

Sinfield said the Purdue method also shows promise for detecting chlorine based compounds in other contexts, as well as chemicals such as fluorine, bromine or iodine in an array of application spaces.

The work aligns with Purdue’s Giant Leaps celebration, celebrating the university’s global advancements in health and sustainability as part of Purdue’s 150th anniversary. These are two of the four themes of the yearlong celebration’s Ideas Festival, designed to showcase Purdue as an intellectual center solving real-world issues.

Researchers worked with the Purdue Office of Technology Commercialization to patent the innovation, and they are looking for partners to continue developing it. 

The Uses of 3D Modeling Technology in the Environmental Remediation Industry

By: Matt Lyter (Senior Staff Geologist at St-John-Mitterhauser & Associates, A Terracon Company) and Jim Depa (Senior Project Manager/3D Visualization Manager at St-John-Mitterhauser & Associates, A Terracon Company)

Three-dimensional (3D) modeling technology is used by geologists and engineers in the economic and infrastructure industries to help organize and visualize large amounts of data collected from fieldwork investigations.  In the oil and gas industry, petroleum geologists use 3D models to visualize complex geologic features in the subsurface in order to find structural traps for oil and natural gas reserves.  In the construction industry, engineers use 3D maps and models to help predict the mechanics of the soil and the strength of bedrock for construction projects.  In the mining industry, economic geologists use high resolution 3D models to estimate the value of naturally occurring ore deposits, like gold, copper, and platinum, in a practice known as resource modeling.

All of the models are built in almost the same exact way: 1) By collecting and analyzing soil samples and/or rock cores; 2) Using a computer program to statistically analyze the resulting data to create hundreds or even thousands of new (or inferred) data points; and 3) Visualizing the actual and inferred data to create a detailed picture of the ground or subsurface in three dimensions.  These models can be used in the economic and infrastructure industries to help predict the best locations to install an oil or gas well, predict the size of an oil or natural gas reserve, assist in the design of a road, tunnel, or landfill, calculate the amount of overburden material needing to be excavated, or help to predict the economic viability of a subsurface exploration project.

However, because of the significant amount of computing power needed to create the models, usage of the technology by regulatory driven industries has been limited.  But continuing technological advancements have recently made 3D modeling technology more accessible and affordable for these regulatory driven industries, including the environmental investigation and remediation industry.  Complex 3D models that previously may have taken several days to create using expensive high-end computers, can now be made in several hours (or even minutes) using the technology present in most commercially available desktops.  Because of these advancements, subsurface contamination caused by chemical spills can be visualized and modeled in 3D by environmental geologists at a reasonable price and even in near real-time.

3D Models of Soil Contamination

Some of the applications of 3D modeling technology in the environmental investigation and remediation industry are only just beginning to be utilized, but they have already helped to: 1) Identify data gaps from subsurface investigations, 2) Describe and depict the relationship between the geologic setting of a site and underground migration of a contaminant, and 3) Provide a more accurate estimate of the amount of contamination in the subsurface.  The models have also helped contractors design more efficient remediation systems, assisted governmental regulators in decision making, and aided the legal industry by explaining complex geologic concepts to the non-scientific community.  This is especially true when short animations are created using the models, which can show the data at multiple angles and perspectives – revealing complexities in the subsurface that static two-dimensional images never could.

The consultants at St. John-Mittelhauser and Associates, a Terracon Company (SMA), have used 3D modeling technology on dozens of sites across the United States, most recently, at a large-scale environmental remediation project in the Midwestern United States.  Contamination from spills of trichloroethylene (TCE), a once widely used metal degreaser, were identified at a former auto parts manufacturer during a routine Phase 2 investigation.  Dozens of soil samples were collected and analyzed in order to define the extent of contamination, and once completed, traditional 2D maps and a series of cross-sections were created.  One of the cross sections is shown in the image below:

Cross-section of soil contamination

Traditional Cross-section Showing Geologic Units and Soil Sample Results

The maps and cross sections were presented to remediation contractors with the purpose of designing a remediation system precisely based on treating only the extent of the contaminated soil.  The lowest bid received was for $4.2 million dollars (USD), however, it was evident to SMA that all of the proposed designs failed to take into account the complexity of the subsurface contamination.  Specifically, large portions of the Site, which were not contaminated, were being proposed to be treated.  Therefore, using a 3D dimensional modeling program, SMA visualized the soil sample locations, modeled the extent of the contaminated soil in 3D, and created an animation showing the model at multiple perspectives and angles, at a cost of $12,000 (USD).  A screenshot of the model is provided below:

3D dimensional modeling program results

3D Side View of TCE Contamination in Soil (15 PPM in Green, 250 PPM in Orange)

The project was resubmitted to the remediation contractors with the 3D models and animation included, resulting in a guaranteed fixed-price bid of $3.1 million dollars – a cost savings of over $1.1 million dollars for the client. Additionally, an animation showing both the remedial design plan and confirmatory sampling plan was created and presented to the United States Environmental Protection Agency (the regulatory agency reviewing the project) and was approved without any modifications.  To date, the remediation system has removed over 4,200 pounds of TCE from the subsurface and completion of the project is expected in 2019.  A short animation of the 3D model can be viewed on YouTube.


3D Models Showing PCE Contamination in Soil

The 3D modeling software has also been used to help determine the most cost-effective solution for other remediation projects, and has been able to identify (and clearly present) the sources of chemical spills.  The following link is an animation showing three case studies involving spills of perchloroethene (a common industrial solvent) at a chemical storage facility, ink manufacturer, and former dry cleaner: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0IlN_TIXkGk

The most cost-effective remediation option was different for each site and was based on the magnitude of the contamination, maximum depth of contaminated soil, geologic setting, and the 3D modeled extent of contamination.  Specifically, the contamination at the chemical storage facility was treated using electrical resistance heating technology, chemical oxidants were used to treat the soils at the ink manufacturer, and soil vapor extraction technology was used at the dry cleaner.

However, several barriers remain which prevent the wide-spread use of 3D modeling technology.  The various modeling programs can cost upwards of $20,000, as well as yearly fees for software maintenance.  There are also costs to organize large datasets, build the necessary files, and create the models and animations.  It also must be noted that the 3D models are only statistical predictions of site conditions based on the available data, and the accuracy of the models is wholly dependent on the quantity, and more importantly, the quality of the data.  Even so, 3D modeling technology has proven to play an important role in the environmental remediation industry by helping project managers to understand their sites more thoroughly.  It has also provided a way to disseminate large amounts information to contractors, regulators, and the general public. But, perhaps, most-importantly, it has saved money for clients.


About the Authors

Matt Lyter (Senior Staff Geologist at St-John-Mitterhauser & Associate, A Terracon Company) provides clients with a wide range of environmental consulting services (Environmental litigation support; acquisition and transaction support; site specific risk assessment, etc.), conventional and state-of-the-art environmental Investigation services, and traditional to advanced environmental remediation services.

Jim Depa (Senior Project Manager/3D Visualization Manager at St-John-Mitterhauser & Associate, A Terracon Company) has over 12 years of experience as a field geologist, project manager, and 3D modeler.  He is well-versed with a variety of computer programs including: C-Tech’s Earth Volumetric Studio (EVS), Esri’s ArcGIS, AQTESOLV, MAROS, Power Director 16, and Earthsoft’s EQuIS

Technology Simultaneously Measures 71 Elements in Water

Researchers at New York University (NYU) recently developed a new method for simultaneous measurement of 71 inorganic elements in liquids — including groundwater. The method, utilizing sequential inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry, makes element testing much faster, more efficient, and more comprehensive than was possible in the past.

The NYU researchers studied samples of liquid from a variety of sources worldwide, including tap water from a New York City suburb, snow from Italy and Croatia, rain from Brazil and Pakistan, lake water from Switzerland and Croatia, and seawater from Japan and Brazil.  Testing each sample results in a distinct elemental pattern, creating a “fingerprint” that can help differentiate between substances or trace a liquid back to its environmental origin.

The method—developed by researchers at the isotope laboratory of NYU College of Dentistry and described in the journal RSC Advances, published by the Royal Society of Chemistry—may be used to explore and understand the distribution of inorganic elements beyond the few that are typically measured. It has implications for fields such as nutrition, ecology and climate science, and environmental health.

An analytical technique called inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) is used to measure elements. Historically, ICP-MS instruments have measured elements sequentially, or one by one, but a new type of ICP‐MS instrument at NYU College of Dentistry and roughly two dozen other places around the world has the potential to measure the complete range of inorganic elements all at once.

NYU ICP-MS

“Because of this new method, our mass spectrometer can simultaneously measure all inorganic elements from lithium to uranium. We’re able to measure the elements in far less time, at far less expense, using far less material,” said Timothy Bromage, professor of biomaterials and of basic science and craniofacial biology at NYU College of Dentistry and the study’s senior author.

This technological advancement may help to fill gaps in our understanding of element distributions and concentrations in substances like water. For instance, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency monitors and sets maximum concentration limits for 19 elements in drinking water considered to be health risks, yet many elements known to have health consequences—such as lithium or tin—are neither monitored nor regulated.

“The elemental mapping of concentration levels in bottled and tap water could help to increase our understanding of ‘normal’ concentration levels of most elements in water,” said Bromage.

Bromage and his colleagues designed a method for using simultaneous ICP-MS to detect 71 elements of the inorganic spectrum involving a specific set of calibration and internal standards. The method, for which they have a patent pending, routinely detects elements in seconds to several minutes and in samples as small as 1 to 4 milliliters.

In each sample,​ Bromage and ​his team found ​a distinct ​“​fingerprint”​ or elemental ​pattern, ​suggesting that ​samples can be ​recognized and ​differentiated ​by these ​patterns. The ​elemental ​content of ​water, for ​example, ​typically ​reflects its ​natural ​environment, so ​understanding ​the elemental ​composition can ​tell us if ​water had its ​origins from a ​source with ​volcanic rock ​versus ​limestone, an ​alkaline rock.

CHAR Announces Successful Commissioning of Biocarbon Facility

Andrew White, CEO of CHAR Technologies Ltd.

CHAR Technologies Ltd. (“CHAR”) (YES – TSXV) recently announced that it has successfully commissioned its biocarbon production facility.  CHAR creates two types of biocarbon, an activated charcoal “SulfaCHAR” and a solid biofuel (bio-coal) “CleanFyre.”  At full capacity, the facility will be capable of producing up to 5 tonnes per day of biocarbon.

“Successful commissioning is a very significant milestone for CHAR,” said Andrew White, CEO of CHAR. “We are now able to produce commercial quantities of SulfaCHAR, as well as enough CleanFyre to test as part of our project with ArcelorMittal Dofasco and Walker Environmental.”

The completion of commissioning is the next milestone in CHAR’s Sustainable Development Technology Canada (SDTC) project.  Upon acceptance of the milestone report by SDTC, the next progress payment can be processed.

CleanFyre is a carbon neutral solid biofuel, and through its implementation will allow users to significantly reduce their GHG emissions.  SulfaCHAR is a zero-waste activated charcoal, with application in the desulfurization of renewable natural gas.  Both are made from low-value materials, including anaerobic digestate and wood-based by-products.

About CHAR

CHAR Technologies Ltd. is a cleantech development and services company, specializing in biocarbon development (activated charcoal ‘SulfaCHAR’ and solid biofuel ‘CleanFyre’) and custom equipment for industrial air and water treatment, and providing services in environmental management, site investigation and remediation, engineering, and resource efficiency.

CHAR Pyrolysis Unit, pre-installation and commissioning (Photo Credit: CHAR)

U.S. DOD Rapid Innovation Fund for Innovative Technology in Emergency Response Tools

The United States Department of Defence (U.S. DoD) Rapid Innovation Fund facilitates the rapid insertion of innovative technologies into military systems or programs that meet critical national security needs. DoD seeks mature prototypes for final development, testing, evaluation, and integration. These opportunities are advertised under NAICS codes 541714 and 541715. Awardees may receive up to $3 million in funding and will have up to two years to perform the work. The two phases of source selection are (1) white paper submission and (2) invited proposal submission. The window of opportunity for submitting white papers expires on April 12, 2018 (due by 3:00 PM ET).
Among the numerous R&D opportunities described in the BAA are topics relevant to the development of environmental monitoring and emergency response tools:

  • Handheld automated post-blast explosive analysis device (USDR&E-18-BAA-RIF-RRTO-0001). Handheld automated detection and characterization of explosive residue collected on-scene after an explosion.
  • Handheld networked radiation detection, indication and computation (RADIAC) (DTRA-17-BAA-RIF-0004). A lighter, more compact system for integration into CBBNE situational awareness software architecture of Mobile Field Kit and Tactical Assault Kit.
  • 3-D scene data fusion for rapid radiation mapping/characterization (DTRA-17-BAA-RIF-0005).
  • Immediate decontamination (CBD-18-BAA-RIF-0001). A spray-on decontaminant that can be applied in a single step in ~15 minutes on hardened military equipment.
  • Hyperspectral aerial cueing for chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear and explosive (CBRNE) mobile operations (PACOM-18-BAA-RIF-0001). Real-time detection via drone.
  • Mobile automated object identification and text translation for lab equipment (DTRA-17-BAA-RIF-0003). A tool to help users recognize equipment, chemicals, and potentially hazardous material in real time.

https://www.fbo.gov/spg/ODA/WHS/REF/HQ0034-18-BAA-RIF-0001A/listing.html
[NOTE: This BAA was also issued as HQ0034-18-BAA-RIF-0001B.]

Ontario Announces Cleantech Strategy & Support for Cleantech Companies

Article by Richard CorleySophie Langlois and Catherine Lyons

Goodmans LLP

Recently, the Ontario Minister of Research, Innovation and Science, Reza Moridi, launched Ontario’s Cleantech Strategy (the “Cleantech Strategy“) which aims to catalyze the growth of Ontario’s clean technology sector to support sales into a global market which is expected to grow to $2.5 trillion by 2022. The Cleantech Strategy is aligned with Ontario’s five-year Climate Change Action Plan (CCAP) to fight climate change, reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) pollution, and drive the transition to a low-carbon economy.  It is also aligned with Ontario’s Business Growth Initiative (BGI), which is, among other things, assisting innovative companies to scale up.

Purpose of the Cleantech Strategy

The Cleantech Strategy bolsters Ontario’s commitment to support the development of new, globally competitive low-carbon technologies that will contribute to fighting climate change and to meeting Ontario’s GHG pollution reduction targets of 15% below 1990 levels by 2020, 37% by 2030 and 80% by 2050. As Minister Moridi explained:

By helping our cleantech companies get ready to scale – and helping them to connect to early customers here in Ontario – Ontario is supporting innovation and reducing emissions and environmental impact across industries. Over the longer term, we expect to see more scaled-up Ontario cleantech companies recognized as North American leaders.

Ontario has the largest share of cleantech companies in Canada and the Cleantech Strategy further supports the province’s leadership in GHG pollution reduction through the development and scaling of cleantech solutions.

Principal Elements of the Cleantech Strategy

Based on Ontario’s strengths in cleantech and global demand, the Cleantech Strategy prioritizes the following four cleantech sub-sectors: energy generation and storage, energy infrastructure, bio-products and bio-chemicals, and water and wastewater.

The Cleantech Strategy has four interrelated pillars through which the province intends to meet its objective of helping cleantech companies scale up and meet global demand:

  1. Venture and scale readiness – strengthening opportunities for in-house research and development, strengthening entrepreneur knowledge of key global markets, reducing regulatory uncertainty to facilitate access to capital, and attracting and developing a strong pool of sales, marketing and management talent
  2. Access to capital – increasing access to scaling capital, providing guidance on available provincial and federal cleantech funding, and simplifying access to such capital
  3. Regulatory modernization – streamlining the regulatory environment where possible to reduce barriers for cleantech market entry, supporting performance-based standards and approvals processes, and supporting the development of harmonized industry standards
  4. Adoption and procurement – increasing demonstration and pilot opportunities to de-risk and validate new technologies, and addressing prescriptive and risk-averse procurement practices

Initiatives funded through Ontario’s carbon market as part of the Cleantech Strategy include the Global Market Acceleration Fund (GMAF) and the Green Focus on Innovation and Technology (GreenFIT).

The Global Market Acceleration Fund

The GMAF will help companies lower the risk associated with expanding production of a proven clean technology.  The fund will also assist companies with the cost of scaling up inventory, distribution and sales to domestic and global markets.  The GMAF can provide between $2 million and$5 million of funding to Ontario-based companies with promising GHG reduction technologies and scale-up and export potential.  To receive funding, these companies must be able to demonstrate funding commitments for at least 50% of the eligible project costs. A total of $27 million has been allotted to the GMAF.

Green Focus on Innovation and Technology

Through the GreenFIT program, Ontario will commit $10 million towards demonstration projects of new technologies and services. Early adoption of these new technologies and services will benefit both the adopting public sector institutions with support for their emissions reductions and participating companies with opportunities for validation and credibility for their products.

The content of this article does not constitute legal advice and should not be relied on in that way. Specific advice should be sought about your specific circumstances.

_________________

About the Authors

Richard Corley is a partner at Goodmans LLP and leads the firm’s Cleantech Practice Group.

Sophie Langlois is an associate at Goodmans LLP.  She practices in the area of corporate and securities law and mergers and acquisitions.

Catherine Lyons is a partner at Goodmans LLP.  She dedicates her practice to representing both private and public sector clients at the intersection of municipal and environmental law.

 

This article was first published on the Goodmans LLP website.

CHAR Announces Approval of Funding Grant For CleanFyre Biocoal

CHAR Technologies Ltd. (the “Corporation”) (TSXV:YES) recently announced that it has been approved for a grant totalling $1,062,385 provided by the Government of Ontario through the Low Carbon Innovation Fund (“LCIF”).  The grant is in support of CHAR’s CleanFyre biocoal project, with participation from ArcelorMittal Dofasco (“Dofasco”), Canada’s largest flat roll steel producer and a lead user of CleanFyre within the project, Walker Environmental (“Walker”) as a feedstock supplier and BioLine Corporation (“Bioline”) as a feedstock pre-processor.

“This grant will allow CHAR to work with innovative and progressive companies, including Dofasco, Walker and Bioline, to further develop CleanFyre, a carbon neutral, sustainable, solid biofuel, that meets the strict requirements of the steelmaking industry,” said Andrew White, CEO of CHAR.  “The project will culminate with a 20-tonne trial in an operational blast furnace at Dofasco to prove CleanFyre’s applicability within the steel industry.”

CleanFyre is a carbon neutral solid biofuel, and through its implementation will allow users to significantly reduce their GHG emissions.  Project funding will be disbursed 50% in April, followed by four additional payments on successful milestone completion.

About CHAR

CHAR Technologies Ltd is a cleantech development and services company, specializing in biocarbon development (activated charcoal ‘SulfaCHAR’ and solid biofuel ‘CleanFyre’) and custom equipment for industrial air and water treatment, and providing services in environmental management, site investigation & remediation, engineering, and resource efficiency.

About Low Carbon Innovation Fund

The Low Carbon Innovation Fund is a fund to help researchers, entrepreneurs and companies create and commercialize new, globally competitive, low-carbon technologies that will help Ontario meet its GHG emissions reductions targets.  The Low Carbon Innovation Fund is part of Ontario’s Climate Change Action Plan and is funded by proceeds from the province’s carbon market.

Forward-Looking Statements

Statements contained in this press release contain “forward-looking information” within the meaning of Canadian securities laws.  When considering these forward-looking statements, you should keep in mind the risk factors and other cautionary statements in CHAR’s MD&A dated February 26th, 2018 and available under CHAR’s profile on www.sedar.com. Neither the TSX Venture Exchange nor its Regulation Services Provider (as that term is defined in the policies of the TSX Venture Exchange) accepts responsibility for the adequacy or accuracy of this release.

For further information please contact:

Andrew White
Chief Executive Officer
CHAR Technologies Ltd.
e-mail: andrew.white@chartechnologies.com
tel: 647-968-5347

Marie Verdun
Manager, Corporate Affairs
ArcelorMittal Dofasco
e-mail: marie.verdun@arcelormittal.com
tel: 905-548-7200 x2066

ArcelorMittal Dofasco, Hamilton, Ontario