Posts

Transport Canada publishes quick reference guide for first responders

As part of the Government of Canada’s ongoing commitment to providing first responders and emergency planners with the tools and resources they need to respond to a dangerous goods emergency, Transport Canada convened a meeting of the Steering Committee on First Responder Training today.

The meeting brought together stakeholders and government representatives to help steer the development of a national training curriculum for personnel who respond to railway incidents involving the transportation of dangerous goods.

At the meeting, Transport Canada announced the publication of a quick reference guide, You’re Not Alone!, which is designed to help first responders at the scene of an incident involving flammable liquids.  The guide outlines important safety measures and groups them into five steps as part of emergency planning.

The guide was added to Safety Awareness Kits published by Transport Canada in 2017 and is aimed at first responders and communities.

Transport Canada published these kits and the quick reference guide to raise community awareness of existing available resources on dangerous goods.

The Honourable Marc Garneau, Minister of Transport, in a statement said: “Communities and first responders need to know that if a dangerous goods incident occurs, they’re not alone, and there are resources available to help. The safe transportation of dangerous goods by rail remains one of my top priorities.  We all share a common goal of making sure everyone is prepared for a dangerous goods emergency and the ‘You’re Not Alone!’ quick reference guide is an important piece of that preparation.”

The reference guide can be accessed here.

Guidance on Characterization and Remediation of Fractured Rock

The U.S. Interstate Technology and Regulatory Council (ITRC) recently released its newest guidance document, Characterization and Remediation of Fractured Rock.  The guidance addresses significant advances in skills, tools, and lessons-learned in understanding contaminant flow and transport in fractured rock environments.  If the unique characteristics of fractured rock sites are understood, then modern tools and approaches can be applied to successfully set and meet characterization and remediation goals at these sites.

Contaminated fractured rock sites have often been considered too complex to be remediated, so site managers often default to simply containing the contamination. This guidance provides a high-level introduction to the unique puzzle faced when investigating and remediating fractured rock sites. With the new strategies and technologies presented here, fractured bedrock challenges that may have prevented site remediation in the past are now surmountable.

The guidance begins with a general discussion of fractured rock characteristics and a comparison of fractured rock and porous media CSMs. The guidance further introduces the parameters necessary for developing a fractured rock CSM and stresses the need for an experienced multidisciplinary team. The 21-Compartment Model is also introduced. This model is an adaptation of the 14-Compartment Model (Sale 2011) for unconsolidated materials. This model helps its users to visualize and understand contaminant storage, flux, and flow pathways in fractured rock.

Understanding contaminant fate and transport in fractured rock allows site managers to develop a robust CSM that can guide remediation. Specific geology and lithology and structure control the unique mechanics of fluid flow in fractured rock. In addition to these physical properties, chemical properties affect fate and transport and are equally important in developing the CSM.

This guidance details specific steps in solving the puzzle of fractured rock contaminant fate and transport, including:

  • reviewing and refining the CSM
  • defining the characterization problem
  • identifying significant data gaps
  • defining data collection objectives
  • identifying potential tools for data collection
  • developing and implementing the work plan
  • managing, interpreting, and presenting the data

A downloadable and searchable Tools Selection Worksheet is provided , which was initially used in ISC-1 (ITRC 2015b). The Tools Selection Worksheet allows users to screen for tools to address specific data needs and collect qualitative, semiquantitative or quantitative data as needed. The Tools Selection Worksheet links to detailed descriptions of all the tools and to references for further information. The guidance describes how data can be managed, interpreted, and displayed. Table 5-4 presents valuable lessons learned from real-world fractured rock characterization and remediation projects.

As a CSM nears completion, the guidance offers direction for developing remedial objectives and strategies. A table shows how to assess the different remedial strategies that may address mass stored in the compartments described in the 21-Compartment Model.

Strategies for monitoring contamination for compliance, system operation, and performance are also provided. The guidance explains how to design a monitoring well network that will provide the data needed to understand site conditions, remedy performance, and compliance.

When applied properly, mathematical models are powerful tools for understanding contaminant flow. Chapter 8 describes various model types, proper application, data needs, calibration, sensitivity, and limitations.

Finally, a discussion on stakeholder and regulatory considerations are presented, followed by a collection of case studies that demonstrate practical application of the concepts presented throughout the guidance.

Click HERE to access the document.

New Guide Details Best HazMat Shipping Practices

Graphic Products, Inc. recently made available a new guide, Best Practice Guide to Shipping Hazardous Materials that helps convey the basics of hazardous material regulation.  From dry cleaners to heavy manufacturers, businesses that create waste must report loads they ship. It requires careful work to keep shipments safe and to protect the neighborhoods and environments these hazardous wastes pass through.

In the guide, Graphic Products, Inc.:

  • Give context for the rules — where they came from, and who they apply to;
  • Describe the labels and placards required for marking shipments;
  • Covers other markings like shipping names and identification numbers; and
  • Explain shipping papers and recordkeeping requirements.

Readers of the Guide will see what each classification means, and how marking and documentation requirements interact.  Readers will also understand the overlaps between the the U.S. Department of Transportation rules and other chemical labeling systems, like GHS and HazCom 2012.  This guide will help you comply with the law, and make your shipments safer.