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Evolution of Emergency Management

by Lee Spencer, Spencer Emergency Management Consulting

You would have to be living under a rock to have not heard the resounding thud of the Ontario Auditor General’s report on the state of emergency management in Canada’s most populated province hitting the desks of the emergency management community in Canada (report) . I for one was not shocked by the findings and believe most jurisdictions in Canada would see similar criticism if subject to an OAG review.

For generations, provincial level emergency management has been an after thought.  Historically staffed by second career fire/police/military retirees who were expected to be seen and not heard.  These legacy EMOs were counted on to create order in the otherwise chaotic response phase of large scale disaster and otherwise quickly to be ignored again once the situation was restored and recovery programs began to hand out government grants.

After 9/11 it was clear to elected officials that the public had an expectation of the EMO cavalry galloping in to defeat any hazard, risk or terrorist.  But the costs and the growth that would be needed to meet that expectation could not compete with the schools, hospitals, roads and bridges built to ensure tangible things could be pointed to when an election rolled around.  After all the last thing most governments want claim at election time is they added more civil servants.

So in this era of increased public expectation, EMOs were given very little new resources to modernize and adapt to the new reality.  Provincial EMOs were left to the task of preparedness and response in the modern context with resources more suited to the National Survival primordial ooze from which provincial EMOs emerged.

I am hopeful that the public shaming of our most densely populated economic engine, will lead to a national discussion of the investment required to truly meet the realities and expectations of modern emergency management.There are already several emerging national strategies that will aid in this effort, Canada’s emerging Broadband Public Safety Network and the expanding National Public Alerting Systems are modern capabilities that will go a long way to enhance capacity at even the most modest EMO.

We are also starting to see an expansion in post secondary degrees and diplomas which will lead to firmly establishing emergency management as a profession in Canada.  These emerging professionals will eventually take over the leadership roles from folks like me (second career), bringing with them the education and experience to combine the historical EMOs with modern thinking.

I know my former colleagues in the EMO’s across Canada are shifting uncomfortably at there desks at the moment waiting for their own leaders to ask how they compare to Ontario.  It would seem to me that if your not uncomfortable you just don’t get it.

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About the Author

 Lee Spencer is founder and President of Spencer Emergency Management Consulting.  The company is focused on the strategic integration of emergency management concepts towards an outcome of resilience within a community, business or government.

 

This article was first published Spencer Emergency Management Consulting e-blog site.

FirstOnSite Restoration opens new Quebec branch

FirstOnSite Restoration, Canada’s leading independent disaster restoration services provider, has bolstered its Quebec offering with the opening of a new branch in Ste-Agathe, QC.  The branch will serve the restoration, remediation and reconstruction needs of both existing and new customers in the Laurentians region (including Mont Tremblant, Ste-Agathe and Saint-Sauveur) and complement service provided by the current branches in Montréal and Québec City.

This new branch is led by Senior Project Manager and Acting Branch Manager, Olivier Bertrand. Olivier, who resides in the Laurentians, originally joined FirstOnSite in 2010, and has had a successful history of entrepreneurship, business management and restoration industry expertise. He has more than 10-years experience in disaster recovery and restoration, and has worked on multimillion-dollar commercial restoration and reconstruction projects as well as condominiums and residential rebuilds. Olivier has also owned and operated his own construction firm, where he specialized in new build construction.

“Olivier’s experience in leadership, management and restoration uniquely qualifies him to launch and manage this new FirstOnSite location,” said Barry J. Ross, Executive Vice President, FirstOnSite Restoration.

Supporting Olivier is Project Manager, Eric Archambault, a 30-year veteran of the restoration industry, and an expert in loss evaluation and restoration of major residential and commercial properties. Eric is also a resident of the Laurentians.

The new branch will be reinforced by FirstOnSite’s flagship Montréal/Dorval branch – the largest full service commercial and residential restoration provider in the province, and is the next step of the company’s expansion plans in Quebec.

“The Ste-Agathe branch brings a dedicated and full-time staff to the region and reinforces our commitment to providing superior customer service,” said Ross. “It will help FirstOnSite extend the coverage we offer customers through our existing locations.”

About FirstOnSite Restoration

FirstOnSite Restoration Limited is an independent Canadian disaster restoration services provider, providing remediation, restoration and reconstruction services nationwide, and for the U.S. large loss and commercial market. With approximately 1,000 employees, more than 35 locations, 24/7 emergency service and a commitment to customer service, FirstOnSite  serves the residential, commercial and industrial sectors.

In May 2016, FirstOnSite joined forces with U.S.-based Interstate Restoration, expanding its resource base, and extending its customer service offering and collectively becoming the second largest restoration service provider in North America.

RFPs for Spill Response Equipment by Canadian Coast Guard

The Canadian Coast Guard is soliciting bids for new spill response equipment for use on its marine vessels.  The equipment will be used to contain and remove oil and other contaminants from the water in the case of a spill.

The RFPs can be found at the following web sites:

All interested suppliers may submit a bid which is open to companies from Canada, the United States, and other countries that are part of various trade agreements with Canada.

The competitive procurement strategy will be based on lowest bid meeting the technical specifications.

This will be the first equipment acquired under the Environmental Response Equipment Modernization initiative of the Oceans Protection Plan.  The equipment will include curtain booms, high-speed sweep systems, and small, portable multi-cassette skimmers.

The Environmental Response Equipment Modernization initiative will bring the Coast Guard in line with and beyond current standards regarding environmental spill response and take advantage of innovations and advancements in technology.

Market Report on the Emergency Spill Response Industry

360 Market Updates recently issued an Emergency Spill Response Market Research Report that highlights key dynamics of North America Emergency Spill Response Market sector.  The Research Report passes on an initial survey of the emergency spill response market including its definition, applications and innovation.  Additionally, the report explores the major market players in detail.  The Research Report provides a detailed overview and discussion the status of the players involved in emergency spill response.  It is also a valuable source of information on trends in the industry including projected growth.

Key questions answered in the Emergency Spill Response Market report include the following:

  • What will the market growth rate of Emergency Spill Response market in 2022?
  • What are the key factors driving the North America Emergency Spill Response market?
  • What are sales, revenue, and price analysis of top manufacturers of Emergency Spill Response market?
  • Who are the distributors, traders and dealers of Emergency Spill Response market?
  • Who are the key vendors in Geographical market space?
  • What are the Emergency Spill Response market opportunities and threats faced by the vendors in the North America Emergency Spill Response market?
  • What are sales, revenue, and price analysis by types, application and regions of Emergency Spill Response market?
  • What are the market opportunities and risks?

There are 15 Chapters to deeply display the North America Emergency Spill Response market.

Chapter 1, to describe Emergency Spill Response Introduction, product type and application, market overview, market analysis by countries, market opportunities, market risk, market driving force;

Chapter 2, to analyze the manufacturers of Emergency Spill Response, with profile, main business, news, sales, price, revenue and market share in 2016 and 2017;

Chapter 3, to display the competitive situation among the top manufacturers, with profile, main business, news, sales, price, revenue and market share in 2016 and 2017;

Chapter 4, to show the North America market by countries, covering United States, Canada and Mexico, with sales, revenue and market share of Emergency Spill Response, for each country, from 2012 to 2017;

Chapter 5 and 6, to show the market by type and application, with sales, price, revenue, market share and growth rate by type, application, from 2012 to 2017;

Chapter 7, 8 and 9, to analyze the segment market in United States, Canada and Mexico, by manufacturers, type and application, with sales, price, revenue and market share by manufacturers, types and applications;

Chapter 10, Emergency Spill Response market forecast, by countries, type and application, with sales, price and revenue, from 2017 to 2022;

Chapter 11, to analyze the manufacturing cost, key raw materials and manufacturing process etc.

Chapter 12, to analyze the industrial chain, sourcing strategy and downstream end users (buyers);

Chapter 13, to describe sales channel, distributors, traders, dealers etc.

Chapter 14 and 15, to describe Emergency Spill Response Research Findings and Conclusion, Appendix, methodology and data source

According to an earlier study by Markets and Markets research firm, the emergency spill response market is estimated to be worth USD 33.68 Billion by 2022.   Markets and Markets research firm hold the view that the emergency spill response market is driven by the increasing international trade and transportation and initiatives taken by government agencies of various countries globally to protect the environment from the adverse effects of pollution by enacting various environmental protection and restoration policies and legislations. In the future, government initiatives to strengthen the response to oil spills on the sea would provide opportunities to the players operating in this market.

Spencer EM Consulting forms Strategic Alliance with Flood Barrier America

Spencer Emergency Management Consulting is recently announced it has formed a strategic alliance with Flood Barrier America, Inc..  Combining experts in flood risk assessment with a suite of world class flood response capabilities in order to provide total solution to clients.

Spencer Emergency Management Consulting is focused on the strategic integration of emergency management concepts towards an outcome of resilience within a community, business or government.

Flood Barrier America, Inc. (FBA) provides high quality and practical flood resilience products, services and solutions. FBA does research and collaborates with affiliates and partners that protect against the growing global problem of flooding.

Flood Barrier provided by FBA

 

 

U.S.: FEMA Releases Refreshed National Incident Management System Doctrine

The U.S. Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) recently released the refreshed National Incident Management System (NIMS) doctrine.  NIMS provides a common, nationwide approach to enable the whole community to work together to manage all threats and hazards. NIMS applies to all incidents, regardless of cause, size, location, or complexity.

In April and May 2016, FEMA held a 30-day National Engagement Period, in which stakeholders submitted nearly 3,000 comments and provided feedback on the draft NIMS update, ensuring that it reflects the collective expertise and experience of the whole community.

FEMA will host a series of 60-minute webinars with stakeholders to discuss the updates in the refreshed NIMS and answer questions related to NIMS. All webinars are open to the whole community. For webinar dates, times, and registration information, please go here: https://www.fema.gov/latest-news-updates.

The refreshed NIMS retains key concepts and principles from the 2004 and 2008 versions, while incorporating lessons learned from exercises and real-world incidents, best practices, and changes in national policy.

Download the refreshed NIMS here: www.fema.gov/nims-doctrine-supporting-guides-tools

The refreshed NIMS:

  • Retains key concepts and principles of the 2004 and 2008 versions of NIMS;
  • Reflects and incorporates policy updates and lessons learned from exercises and real-incidents;
  • Clarifies the processes and terminology for qualifying, certifying, and credentialing incident personnel, building  a foundation for the development of a national qualification system;
  • Clarifies that NIMS is more than just the Incident Command System (ICS) and that it applies to all incident personnel, from the incident command post to the National Response Coordination Center;
  • Describes common functions and terminology for staff in Emergency Operations Centers (EOC), while remaining flexible to allow for differing missions, authorities, and resources of EOCs across the nation; and
  • Explains the relationship among ICS, EOCs, and senior leaders/policy groups.

NIMS guides all levels of government, nongovernmental organizations (NGO), and the private sector to work together to prevent, protect against, mitigate, respond to, and recover from incidents. NIMS provides stakeholders across the whole community with the shared vocabulary, systems, and processes to successfully deliver the capabilities described in the National Preparedness System. NIMS defines operational systems, including the Incident Command System (ICS), Emergency Operations Center (EOC) structures, and Multiagency Coordination Groups (MAC Groups) that guide how personnel work together during incidents. NIMS applies to all incidents, from traffic accidents to major disasters.

Please refer to the descriptions below to gain an understanding of where to locate certain information.

NIMS Doctrine Supporting Guides & Tools: The National Integration Center develops supporting guides and tools to assist jurisdictions in their implementation of the National Incident Management System (NIMS).

Training: The NIMS Training Program defines the national NIMS training program. It specifies National Integration Center and stakeholder responsibilities and activities for developing, maintaining and sustaining NIMS training.

Resource Management & Mutual Aid: National resource management efforts aid a unified approach in building and delivering the core capabilities across all five mission areas (Prevention, Protection, Mitigation, Response and Recovery).  Effective resource management is founded on the guiding principles of the NIMS.

Implementation Guidance & Reporting: Federal Departments and agencies are required to make adoption of NIMS by local, state, territorial, and tribal nation jurisdictions a condition to receive Federal Preparedness grants and awards.

NIMS Alerts: The National Integration Center announces the release of new NIMS guidance, tools, and other resources through the distribution of NIMS Alerts.

FEMA NIMS Regional Contacts: The FEMA Regional NIMS Coordinators act as subject matter experts regarding NIMS for the local, state, territorial, and tribal nation governments within their FEMA Region, as well as for the FEMA Regional Administrator and staff.

Incident Command System Resources: The Incident Command System (ICS) is a fundamental element of incident management. The use of ICS provides standardization through consistent terminology and established organizational structures.