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BC Ministry of the Environment: Staffing Announcement

The British Columbia Environment Ministry recently announced that Danielle Grbavac has been named as as Director, Land Remediation within the Environmental Emergencies and Land Remediation Branch, Environmental Protection Division, Ministry of Environment and Climate Change Strategy.

 

Danielle has 15 years of experience working in environmental science, including marine geoscience, coastal geomorphology, climate change and most recently contaminated sites, both for the provincial and federal governments. She holds a Bachelor of Science in Geography (hons) from the University of Victoria and a Master of Science in Environmental Geomorphology from the University of Oxford. She has also completed graduate level studies in public administration from the University of Victoria.

Before joining the BC public service, Danielle worked as a marine geoscientist for the Geological Survey of Canada. Since joining the ministry she has worked on regulatory development in the Climate Action Secretariat and issues management for BC Parks and the Conservation Officer Service. She joined the Land Remediation Section in 2015, as Operations Manager, leading a diverse team of professionals responsible for oversight of high risk site classification and site identification, as well as the development of policy for legislative and regulatory change and related guidance for BC’s site remediation program. Additionally, Danielle has held an associate faculty position at Royal Roads University for nearly a decade teaching in the School of Environment and Sustainability and the International Study Centre.

Danielle brings a wealth of knowledge and background, and great interpersonal skills to her new role. She is looking forward to identifying priorities for contaminated sites work after the recent standards updates in the Stage 10 & 11 Contaminated Sites Regulation amendments in November 2017. She intends to maintain and strengthen the ministry’s relationships with its partners and stakeholders within the contaminated sites community.

New spill reporting, response and recovery requirements in British Columbia

As reported by Norton Rose Fulbright, the Province of British Columbia recently brought into force a new land-based spills regime and three new regulations requiring transporters of liquid petroleum products to have provincial spill response plans, to test such plans and to report and clean up spills. The new regulations apply to two categories of people:

  • “regulated persons,” which are rail and highway transporters in possession, charge or control of 10,000 litres (62.898 barrels) or more of liquid petroleum products and pipeline operators with any quantity of liquid petroleum products in their pipeline; and
  • “responsible persons,” which are persons in possession, charge or control of a substance when a spill occurs or is imminent.

The three new regulations are the Spill Contingency Planning Regulation, the Spill Preparedness Recovery Regulation and the Spill Reporting Regulation.

Spill contingency planning

Regulated persons are required to develop and maintain spill contingency plans based on a worst-case scenario spill. Investigations, tests and surveys must be undertaken to determine the magnitude of the risks to human health, the environment and infrastructure from a worst-case spill. Pipeline and rail transporters must have their spill contingency plans in place by April 30, 2018, while trucking firms have until October 30, 2018.

Spill response efforts have failed to contain an estimated 110,000 litres of diesel and other petroleum products from the tugboat Nathan E. Stewart, which ran aground Oct. 13 in the Seaforth Channel near Bella Bella. (Photo Credit: Ian McAllister/CBC)

It is important to note that, while the spill planning obligations may resemble transportation of dangerous goods-type plans, they impose new requirements.

Spill reporting

New spill reporting requirements require a responsible person to immediately report any intentional or unintentional spill of a substance into the environment that may cause, is causing or has caused an adverse effect to water, the environment, human health or property if the volume of the substance exceeds the amounts set out in a schedule to the Spill Reporting Regulation or if the substance has or is likely to enter a body of water, regardless of the volume. Natural gas spills greater than 10 kg and releases from breakages of pipelines or fittings operated above 100 psi must also be reported.

The new regulation expands the scope of spills that must be reported, as it removes the previous volume/quantity threshold for spills to water.

It also expands the information that must be reported.

If a spill occurs or is imminent, a verbal report must immediately be made to the BC Provincial Emergency Program’s spill reporting hotline (1-800-663-3456) by the responsible person. New requirements stipulate the initial report must include the name of the owner of the spilled substance and a description of the source of the spill.

Starting on October 30, 2018, a written report must also be made within 30 days of the spill, or as soon as practicable on the minister’s request. An end-of-spill report must also be made within 30 days of the end of a spill’s emergency response activities.

Spill response

A responsible person must ensure persons with the skill, experience, resources and equipment arrive at the spill site within a prescribed period and activate an incident command system. They must also ensure actions are taken to address the threat or hazard caused by the spill, including assessing, monitoring and preventing the threat or hazard; stabilizing, containing and cleaning up the spill; identifying the immediate and long-term risks and impacts of the spill; and taking steps to resolve or mitigate such risks and impacts.

 

BC Ministry of the Environment – New Draft Analytical Methods Posted for Review

New draft analytical methods listed below, were developed by the B.C. Environment Ministry with the assistance of the British Columbia Environmental Laboratory Technical Advisory Committee (BCELTAC).  They were recently posted for review and comment to the ministry’s Sampling, Methods & Quality Assurance webpage, BC Environmental Laboratory Manual, “Methods Posted for Review”.

  1. Liquid-Solid Partitioning (Leachability) of VOCs – Prescriptive
  2. Asbestos in Water by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) – Prescriptive
  3. Perfluorinated Alkyl Acids (PFAA) in Soils by LC/MS/MS – PBM
  4. Perfluorinated Alkyl Acids (PFAA) in Water by LC/MS/MS – PBM

The majority of these new draft methods have been developed in support of the Stage 10 (Omnibus) amendment to the B.C. Contaminated Sites Regulation.

The B.C. Ministry of the Environment is asking for comments on the new methods by September 5, 2017.  Comments can be sent to Joyce Austin, Senior Provincial Laboratory Specialist, Knowledge Management Branch at Joyce.Austin@gov.bc.ca.

Technical questions regarding the proposed new method should be directed to: Mark Hugdahl (BCELTAC Chair) at Mark.Hugdahl@alsglobal.com.

 

Events

Update on Contaminated Sites Regime in British Columbia – June 7th 2018

GeoEnviroPro is hosting an informative one-day seminar on new aspects of the British Columbia (BC) Contaminated Sites regime, In past years, this seminar has proven to be a popular forum for peer discussion of new policies, guidance and procedures; and for sharing possible approaches and solutions. The seminar is valuable for contaminated site practitioners, regulators and site owners. Presenters include:

  • Provincial ministry staff (Land Remediation Section)
  • Contaminated Sites Specialists
  • Approved Professionals and
  • Federal agency staff.

June 7, 2018 @ 8:00 am – 5:00 pm

UBC Robson Square ( 800 Robson Street, Vancouver, BC V6Z 3B7 Canada )

Cost

Professional: $650

In-Training and Regulatory/Government: $570

  • Event Info
  • Submission Process

REGISTER NOW

BEST 2018 – BRITISH COLUMBIA’S PREMIER ENVIRONMENT CONFERENCE!

May 9-11, 2018
Fairmont Chateau Whistler | Whistler, BC

 

 

The British Columbia Environment Industry Association’s BEST Conference attracts environmental professionals every May for two days of technical sessions, networking opportunities, and a sponsor exhibition. Register now! You don’t want to miss out on the “BEST” opportunity to network and learn about the current environment industry in BC.

FULL CONFERENCE PROGRAM NOW ONLINE

Technical session streams have been finalized and presentations have been selected in a variety of areas including: Contaminated Site Management; Hazardous Waste; First Nations; Water, Government Regulations and much more. A complete schedule, along with abstracts and bios, can be found on the BEST website at: bceia.com/best.

A complete schedule, along with abstracts and bios, can be found on the BEST website at: bceia.com/best.

What past delegates said about BEST:

  • Excellent speakers and BEST is exceptional for networking opportunities.
  • The keynote speakers were fantastic, the location for the conference was absolutely stunning. 
  • The size of the conference was really perfect for networking and there were multiple opportunities to do so. A very enjoyable and productive conference.
  • It was my first time attending, I will attend next year’s conference.

REGISTRATION

BCEIA MEMBERS  $700 | NON-MEMBERS  $850

Conference registration includes a welcoming reception, technical sessions, keynote presentations, an off-site networking reception, and all meals and coffee breaks.

Registration details can be found at: events.eply.com/BEST2018.