Government Funding Available to assist with exports for SME Cleantech Companies

The Government of Canada recently announced that $17 million would be made available for small-to-medium enterprise (SME) echnology companies (including Cleantech) to assist in exports.

The $17 million will be used to expand the successful Canadian Technology Accelerator (CTA) program and will be distributed to eligible companies over a five year period.

About the CTA Program

The Canadian Technology Accelerator (CTA) is a program of the Canadian Global Affairs Canada’s Trade Commissioner Service. It offers high-intensity programming that helps selected high-growth, high-potential Canadian technology firms scale up by connecting them with export, investment and partnership opportunities in global innovation centres. Over the course of a four- to six-month program, CTA participants are provided with tailored support ranging from in-market working space and coaching to market validation and introductions to potential partners, clients and investors.

Since 2013, the CTA program has helped over 500 Canadian technology companies accelerate their growth by gaining a foothold in key U.S. innovation centres. Since 2013, the program has achieved notable success in Boston, New York and San Francisco. An investment of $2 million a year has been leveraged into $510 million in capital raised, $190 million in new revenue, 996 strategic partnerships and 2,125 new jobs for 489 high-growth, high-potential firms in key technology sectors, such as information and communications technology, life sciences and clean-tech.

Canadian SME Cleantech Leaders

There are many examples of SME clean tech companies in Canada. Of the recent Global Cleantech 100 companies listed by the Cleantech Group, 12 are from Canada. The Canadian companies on the Global Cleantech 100 list are as follows:

  • Axine Water Technologies – Created a new standard for treating toxic organic pollutants in industrial wastewater, solving a global problem for pharmaceutical, chemical and other manufacturing industries. Vancouver, B.C.
  • CarbonCure – Retrofits concrete industry plants with a technology that recycles waste carbon dioxide to make affordable, greener concrete products. Halifax, N.S.
  • Cooledge Lighting – Provides adaptable LED lighting solutions to help the design industry integrate light into the built environment. Richmond, B.C.
  • ecobee – Empowers people to transform their lives, homes, communities and planet through innovative technologies that are accessible and affordable. In 2007, ecobee introduced the world’s first smart Wi-Fi thermostat to help millions of people save energy and money without compromising comfort. Toronto, Ont.
  • Enbala – Provides the advanced technology needed to ensure the operational stability of the world’s power grids by harnessing the power of distributed energy. Vancouver, B.C.
  • GaN Systems – Manufactures a range of highly efficient transistors that address the needs of various industries, including renewable energy systems, data centre servers, automotive systems, industrial motors and consumer electronics. Ottawa, Ont.
  • Inventys – Commercializes a low-cost and energy efficient technology for capturing post-combustion CO₂ from various sources, such as natural gas boilers, gas turbines, and industrial facilities, such as cement plants. Burnaby, B.C.
  • Metamaterials Technologies – Develops smart materials and photonics to provide solutions in the field of optics for several industries, including aerospace and defence, healthcare, energy, education, and cleantech. Dartmouth, N.S.
  • MineSense Technologies – Improves the ore extraction and recovery process to significantly increase profitability and decrease requirements for energy, water and chemicals. Vancouver, B.C.
  • Opus One Solutions – Developed GridOS®, an intelligent data analytical platform for smart grids that delivers optimal energy planning and management to generate, distribute, store and consume energy in a distributed network, paving the way toward a distributed energy economy. Toronto, Ont.
  • Semios -Develops agricultural technology innovation involving precision agriculture, biological pest control and data management. Vancouver, B.C.
  • Terramera – Uses technology to replace synthetic chemical pesticides with high-performance, plant-based pest control products for agricultural and consumer use. Vancouver, B.C.

The cleantech global market is estimated to be worth US$1 trillion and expected to surpass the US $2.5 trillion by 2022.

Latest Funding Allocation

The additional $17 million in funding will allow the expansion of CTA programming to global innovation centres: Berlin, Delhi, London and Mexico City. This builds upon the recent expansion of the CTA to four Asian cities (Hong Kong, Taipei, Tokyo and Singapore), funded as part of Budget 2018’s commitment to strengthen Canada’s diplomatic and trade support presence in Asia. 

Who is Eligible and How to Apply

CTAs are open to innovative Canadian tech companies that can demonstrate:

  • Traction in the Marketplace: You have at least a minimum viable product (MVP), along with quantifiable evidence of maturity (revenue, investment, or number of users).
  • Product Market Fit: You can define your target audience, articulate the problem you solve, and demonstrate differentiation of your product/service.
  • Strong & Experienced Executive Management Team: You can commit to send at least one senior member (C-level or Founder) to take part in the program and have the financial resources to cover in-market costs.
  • Potential to Scale: You have a well thought out go-to-market plan for the CTA location along with KPIs to match.

Participants are chosen in a competitive process. The Trade Commissioner Service and a panel of industry experts review the applications and decide whether applicants are eligible and a good fit for a location.

If you are chosen a CTA team members will contact you. Companies must be ready to commit the time and money needed for their executives to live full time in the target location.

For more information on how to apply, visit the CTA website.

Canada’s Key Cleantech Centres

Dredging Company fined $350,000 for depositing damaging substance into Fraser River

Company fined $350,000 for depositing damaging substance in Fraser River

Fraser River Pile and Dredge (GP) Inc. recently pleaded guilty to the Fisheries Act violation in British Columbia provincial court. The court fined the company $350,000. The fine was a result of one of the company’s dredging causing the depositing a deleterious substance into water frequented by fish – the Fraser River.

The conviction stems from an incident that occurred on the Fraser River in February 2014. During that time, the company was dredging in Deas Slough in the Fraser River when its vessel punctured a submerged water main carrying chlorinated water to the City of Delta. Enforcement officers from Environment Canada and Climate Change (ECCC) investigated the incident and determined that chlorinated water was released through the pipe into the waterway.

ECCC charged the company with the Fisheries Act violation as Deas Slough is an important fish-bearing body of water and the concentration of chlorine that was released was damaging to fish.

FRPD Equipment in Operation (Source: FRPD)

Fraser River Pile & Dredge (GP) Inc. (FRPD) is Canada’s largest Marine & Infrastructure, Land Foundations and Dredging contractor.  FRPD’s fleet includes cutter suction and trailing suction hopper dredges, spud barges, cranes, dump scows, and flat scows. The company performs all types and sizes of marine & infrastructure, environmental remediation, dredging and land foundations projects.

The $350,000 collected from the company by the government will be directed to the Government of Canada’s Environmental Damages Fund. Also, the company’s name will be added to an Candian environmental offenders registry.

Ontario: Trucking Company Fined $250,000 over hazmat incident

Titanium Trucking Services Inc., headquartered in Ontario, was recently convicted of one violation under the Ontario Environmental Protection Act and was fined $250,000 plus a victim fine surcharge of $62,500 and was given 24 months to pay the fine. The fine was the result of a hazmat incident in which a fluorosilicic acid spilled from a tanker truck into the natural environment, which caused adverse effects.

Fluorosilicic acid is corrosive and causes burns. It decomposes when heated, with possible emanation of toxic hydrofluoric acid vapours. It is used in fluoridating water and in aluminum production. In the aquatic environment, an accidental spillage of fluorosilic acid would suddenly reduce pH level due to the product’s acidic properties.

At the time of the offence, Titanium Trucking Services Inc., which is located in Bolton (just northwest of Toronto) had a contract with a Burlington, Ontario area chemical company to provide drivers and vehicles on a dedicated basis for chemical product transportation.

In January 2017, the Burlington area chemical company placed an order for 81,000 kg of 37-42% fluorosilicic acid, which was required for pickup in Montreal for transport to Burlington.  Fluorosilicic acid is a corrosive liquid, classified as a dangerous good. 

On the date of the planned chemical pick-up, Environment Canada had issued weather advisories relating to a major winter storm and the public was instructed to consider postponing non-essential travel.

The chemical pick-up occurred as planned on March 14, 2017, and within four hours after leaving Montreal, the truck and the driver were involved in a multi-vehicle collision while traveling westbound on Highway 401. As a result of the collision 15 totes of fluorosilicic acid ejected through the front wall of the trailer and also came to rest in the roadside ditch.

Eight of the totes of acid that ejected from the trailer were punctured and spilled approximately 8,000 litres of acid into the ditch and onto the truck cab, dousing the driver, which eventually resulted in his death later in hospital.


March 14, 2017 incident on Highway 401 near Mallorytown. Several first responders were exposed and needed to be decontaminated. (XBR Traffic)

The acid discharge caused further adverse effects. a total of 13 First responders and another sixteen members of the public had to be decontaminated, the 401 highway was closed in both directions, and the OPP officer who initially attempted to extract the truck driver from the cab on scene experienced significant health effects. In addition, adverse impacts to the roadside soil ecosystem occurred.

Ontario: Consultant fined $22,500 for submitting false information to Environment Ministry

Stephen Harold Arkell, an environmental consultant and owner of CR Consulting in Markham, was recently convicted on three violations under the Ontario Environmental Protection Act and was fined $22,500 plus a victim fine surcharge of $5,625 with 18 months to pay the fine. As part of the conviction an 18 month Probation Order was issued by the court.

The convictions relate to submitting false information electronically to the Ontario Environment Ministry’s Environmental Activity and Sector Registry.

Stephen Harold Arkell has an office in Markham and during the time of the violations, provided consulting services by preparing environmental application submissions for the purpose of obtaining Ontario Environment Ministry approvals and registering on the Environmental Activity Sector Registry. Mr. Arkell is not and has never been a licenced engineering practitioner.

Before conducting an activity that may discharge contaminants into the natural environment (other than water) legislation requires that the business or individual obtain a ministry approval or register on the Environmental Activity and Sector Registry. A licenced engineer is needed to complete these requirements.

During the period, Mr. Arkell prepared and submitted registrations to the Environmental Activity and Sector Registry on behalf of clients engaged in activities that required a registration due to their potential to emit contaminant(s) to the air. 

In all cases, the registrations that Mr. Arkell prepared and submitted indicated that the required documents had been prepared by an engineer and also indicated an engineer licence number. However, this information was false. By committing these offences, Mr. Arkell impacted the registrations of three separate companies between July 2017 and January 2018.

The ministry’s Investigations and Enforcement Branch investigated and laid charges resulting in three convictions.

Mr. Arkell’s LinkedIn indicates that he has been the owner of CR Consulting since 2010. It states that his company prepares air emission applications for industries who are required to register with the Ministry of the Environment for Certificates of Approval (air). As part of the application process, the company prepares Emission Summary and Dispersion Modeling reports.

Ontario: Fertilizer Producer fined $90,000 for Ammonia Spill

Terra International (Canada) Inc., was recently was convicted of one offence under the Ontario Environmental Protection Act (EPA) and was fined $90,000 plus a victim fine surcharge of $22,500. The conviction stems from an incident that occurred on August 11, 2016 when the company reported an ammonia gas release to the Ontario Environment Ministry’s Spills Action Centre. It was subsequently determined that approximately 8.57 tonnes of liquid ammonia was released and contained, which resulted in a release of 997 kilograms of ammonia gas to the air over a two-hour period.

The ammonia release resulted in various adverse effects including the closure of nearby roads for approximately one hour. In addition, two reports were received alleging odours, with one of those alleging irritation; a third report alleged irritation, nausea and difficulty breathing; and employees at one neighbouring company reported evacuating for approximately two hours.

Upon discovery of the ammonia gas release, personnel from Terra conducted a root cause analysis which concluded that a previously unknown mechanical deficiency in an ammonia pump resulted in the failure of a vent pipe containing liquid ammonia.

Terra International (Canada) Inc. is a wholly owned subsidiary of CF Industries and operates a facility in St. Clair Township, Ontario (30 km south of Sarnia, Ontario) where it produces ammonia and urea products. To produces up to 1.0 million tons of nitrogen products for agricultural and industrial use each year. Approximately 200 people work at the facility.

Pyrolysis makes oil-soaked soil fertile again

As reported by David Ruth in Physics.org, researchers at Rice University in Texas have developed a method of decontaminating soil impacted with heavy oil and making it fertile again. Rice engineers Kyriacos Zygourakis and Pedro Alvarez and their colleagues have fine-tuned their method to remove petroleum contaminants from soil through pyrolysis. The technique gently heats soil while keeping oxygen out, which avoids the damage usually done to fertile soil when burning hydrocarbons cause temperature spikes.

While large-volume marine spills get most of the attention, 98 percent of oil spills occur on land, Alvarez points out, with more than 25,000 spills a year reported to the Environmental Protection Agency. That makes the need for cost-effective remediation clear, he said.

“We saw an opportunity to convert a liability, contaminated soil, into a commodity, fertile soil,” Alvarez said.

The key to retaining fertility is to preserve the soil’s essential clays, Zygourakis said. “Clays retain water, and if you raise the temperature too high, you basically destroy them,” he said. “If you exceed 500 degrees Celsius (900 degrees Fahrenheit), dehydration is irreversible.”

The researchers put soil samples from Hearne, Texas, contaminated in the lab with heavy crude, into a kiln to see what temperature best eliminated the most oil, and how long it took.

Their results showed heating samples in the rotating drum at 420 C (788 F) for 15 minutes eliminated 99.9 percent of total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) and 94.5 percent of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), leaving the treated soils with roughly the same pollutant levels found in natural, uncontaminated soil.

The paper appears in the American Chemical Society journal Environmental Science and Technology. It follows several papers by the same group that detailed the mechanism by which pyrolysis removes contaminants and turns some of the unwanted hydrocarbons into char, while leaving behind soil almost as fertile as the original. “While heating soil to clean it isn’t a new process,” Zygourakis said, “we’ve proved we can do it quickly in a continuous reactor to remove TPH, and we’ve learned how to optimize the pyrolysis conditions to maximize contaminant removal while minimizing soil damage and loss of fertility.

“We also learned we can do it with less energy than other methods, and we have detoxified the soil so that we can safely put it back,” he said.

Heating the soil to about 420 C represents the sweet spot for treatment, Zygourakis said. Heating it to 470 C (878 F) did a marginally better job in removing contaminants, but used more energy and, more importantly, decreased the soil’s fertility to the degree that it could not be reused.

“Between 200 and 300 C (392-572 F), the light volatile compounds evaporate,” he said. “When you get to 350 to 400 C (662-752 F), you start breaking first the heteroatom bonds, and then carbon-carbon and carbon-hydrogen bonds triggering a sequence of radical reactions that convert heavier hydrocarbons to stable, low-reactivity char.”

The true test of the pilot program came when the researchers grew Simpson black-seeded lettuce, a variety for which petroleum is highly toxic, on the original clean soil, some contaminated soil and several pyrolyzed soils. While plants in the treated soils were a bit slower to start, they found that after 21 days, plants grown in pyrolyzed soil with fertilizer or simply water showed the same germination rates and had the same weight as those grown in clean soil.


Lettuce growing in once oil-contaminated soil revived by a process developed by Rice University engineers. The Rice team determined that pyrolyzing oil-soaked soil for 15 minutes at 420 degrees Celsius is sufficient to eliminate contaminants while preserving the soil’s fertility. The lettuce plants shown here, in treated and fertilized soil, showed robust growth over 14 days. Credit: Wen Song/Rice University

“We knew we had a process that effectively cleans up oil-contaminated soil and restores its fertility,” Zygourakis said. “But, had we truly detoxified the soil?”

To answer this final question, the Rice team turned to Bhagavatula Moorthy, a professor of neonatology at Baylor College of Medicine, who studies the effects of airborne contaminants on neonatal development. Moorthy and his lab found that extracts taken from oil-contaminated soils were toxic to human lung cells, while exposing the same cell lines to extracts from treated soils had no adverse effects. The study eased concerns that pyrolyzed soil could release airborne dust particles laced with highly toxic pollutants like PAHs.

”One important lesson we learned is that different treatment objectives for regulatory compliance, detoxification and soil-fertility restoration need not be mutually exclusive and can be simultaneously achieved,” Alvarez said.

HAZMAT Labels Market: global industry analysis by 2028

Future Markets Inc. recently published a research report on the Hazmat Labels Market. The report, entitled Global HAZMAT Labels Market: Overview – HAZMAT Labels, provides an overview of the market and predicts the growth of the industry.

The report is a compilation of first-hand information, qualitative assessment by industry analysts, inputs from industry experts and industry participants across the value chain. The report provides in-depth analysis of parent market trends, macroeconomic indicators and governing factors along with market attractiveness as per segments. The report also maps the qualitative impact of various market factors on market segments and geographies.

Regional analysis includes – North America, Latin America, Eastern Europe, Asia Pacific excluding Japan (APEJ), Middle East & Africa (MEA), and Japan.

Report Highlights include a detailed overview of the following:

  • market, changing market dynamics in the industry;
  • In-depth market segmentation;
  • Historical, current, and projected market size regarding volume and value;
  • Recent industry trends and developments;
  • Competitive landscape;
  • Strategies for key players and products offered’
  • Potential and niche segments; and
  • Geographical regions exhibiting promising growth

Hazmat Labels – Requirements

Hazmat labels must have excellent durability and cannot be impaired by other labels, markings & attachments. HAZMAT labels are categorized into nine classes for different purposes such as explosives, flammable gases, flammable liquids, inhalation hazards, organic peroxides etc. HAZMAT Labels for each class have a specific size & color. Most of the HAZMAT labels have contrasting background & a dotted line border. HAZMAT labels have text & symbols either in white or black.

It is important to choose the correct HAZMAT labels for shipments, as labelling a material incorrectly can result in costly shipping delays, injuries & fines. HAZMAT labels must be printed or attached to any one side of product offered for transport. It is mandatory for HAZMAT labels to be attached alongside UN numbers.

Transport Canada and the US Department of Transportation (DOT) has developed certain specifications for labels, markings and placards that must be prominently displayed on each package or container, including transport vehicles in order to safeguard health, safety, and property. The global market of HAZMAT labels is anticipated to grow rapidly during the forecast period, due to growing demand from chemical, pharmaceutical and various other end use industries.

Stringent labeling regulations by governments regarding the transportation of hazardous material accelerates market growth of HAZMAT labels, globally. Rising popularity of interactive packaging where end users can directly track the packaging using HAZMAT labels with technologies such as
radio-frequency identification (RFID) is considered a new opportunity for growth of the HAZMAT labels market.

Global HAZMAT Labels Market: Segmentation

On the basis of material, global HAZMAT labels market has been segmented as: Paper, Plastic ( Polyolefin, Vinyl, Others ). On the basis of product type, global HAZMAT labels market has been segmented as: DOT HAZMAT labels and U.S. EPA HAZMAT labels. On the basis of end use, global HAZMAT labels market has been segmented as: Pharmaceutical, Electrical & Electronics, Chemical and Petrochemicals, and Agriculture & Allied Industries.

Geographic Market

The global HAZMAT labels market has been segmented based on the region like North America, Latin America, Western Europe, Eastern Europe, MEA, APEJ, and Japan. Asia Pacific and MEA. U.S. has strong market in HAZMAT labels accounting for highest refineries & chemical producing nation in the world. The U.S. accounts for the largest share in HAZMAT labels market, owing to a large petrochemical industry. MEA region and other Asia Pacific countries such as China, India etc. are expected to witness moderate growth in the HAZMAT labels market, during the forecast period.

Key Players

Some of the key players in the HAZMAT labels market are as follows: Emedco Inc., J.Keller & Associates Inc., Brimar Industries, Inc., Air Sea Containers, Inc., National Marker Company, Labelmaster Services Inc., BASCO, Inc., LPS Industries, LLC.;

Many local and unrecognized players are expected to contribute to the global HAZMAT labels market during forecast period.

Key Developments

Some of the key developments in the HAZMAT labels market are as follows:

  • HSE Inc. has introduced HAZMAT labels with pictograms alert in order to describe presence of a hazardous chemical.
  • In February 2018, Labelmaster Services Inc. announced that it has been named the exclusive label manufacturer and distributor for CHEMTREC.

2018 Future of Global Conventional and Rapid Environmental Testing Market to 2025

Research and Markets recently published a research report entitled The Global Conventional and Rapid Environmental Testing market outlook report. The report covers from 2019 to 2025 and is a comprehensive work on Conventional and Rapid Environmental Testing industry. This research report provides complete insight into the penetration of Conventional and Rapid Environmental Testing across applications worldwide. Emphasis is given on the market drivers, restraints and potential growth opportunities. Detailed strategic analysis review of the Conventional and Rapid Environmental Testing market together with Porter’s five forces analysis is provided for global Conventional and Rapid Environmental Testing market.

The report assesses the 2018 market size in terms of market revenues based on the average prices of Conventional and Rapid Environmental Testing products worldwide. The report also presents a 6-year outlook on the basis of anticipated growth rates (CAGR) for different types of Conventional and Rapid Environmental Testing and the industry as a whole. Further, detailed pricing analysis of products is provided in the report.

The research work also explores how Conventional and Rapid Environmental Testing manufacturers are adapting to the changing market conditions through key market strategies. Further, company to company comparison (Company benchmarking) and Conventional and Rapid Environmental Testing product-to-product comparison (Product benchmarking) are included in the research work. Business, SWOT and financial Profiles of five leading companies in global Conventional and Rapid Environmental Testing market are included in the report.

A 2018 market report on the environmental testing industry by Esticast Research & Consulting predict a CAGR 6.6% during the forecast period of 2018 to 2025. The report also states that the market for environmental testing appears fragmented and fiercely competitive due to many large and small players churning the competition in the market.  Through the strategic partnership, acquisition, expansion, product & technology launch, and collaboration, these players try to gain a competitive edge.

The Esticast market report states that one driver behind the growth of the environmental testing market is the surging trend of health consciousness among the people. In addition, government authorities are posing strict regulations regarding environmental protection, with an aim to survive in a healthy environment. The report also predicts that environmental testing market to offer lucrative opportunities to the existing and new market players due to the privatization of environmental testing services.

A few of the major players in the environmental testing marketing include Eurofins Scientific SE, Suburban Testing Labs, Agilent Technologies Inc., SCS Global Services, Bureau Veritas S.A., SYNLAB, R J Hill Laboratories Limited, TÜV SÜD, ALS Limited, Intertek, and Pace Analytical.

For more information please Research and Markets report, click on:
https://www.researchandmarkets.com/publication/mrlxu9n/4750967



U.S.: Opportunity for Environmental R&D Funds for Small & Large Businesses

On January 29th 2019,  the U.S. Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP) and the U.S. Environmental Security Technology Certification Program (ESTCP) released a solicitation for both small and large businesses to competitively fund research and development for environmental research.

The Department of Defense (DoD) SERDP Office is interested in receiving white papers for research focusing in the areas of Environmental Restoration, Munitions Response, Resource Conservation and Resiliency, and Weapons Systems and Platforms technologies. The ESTCP Office is interested in receiving white papers for innovative technology demonstrations that address DoD environmental and installation energy requirements as candidates for funding.

SERDP supports environmental research relevant to the management and mission of the DoD and supports efforts that lead to the development and application of innovative environmental technologies or methods that improve the environmental performance of DoD by improving outcomes, managing environmental risks, and/or reducing costs or time required to resolve environmental problems.

Awardees under this Broad Agency Announcement (BAA) will be selected through a multi-stage review process. The white paper review step allows interested organizations to submit research white papers for Government consideration without incurring the expense of a full proposal. Based upon the white paper evaluation by SERDP, each of the white paper submitters will be notified as to whether SERDP requests or does not request the submission of a full proposal. As noted in the instructions located on the SERDP website, evaluation criteria for white papers are Technical Merit and SERDP Relevance.

Instructions in the links below pertain to the submission of white papers responding to the SERDP BAA for Environmental Research and Development.  This BAA is for Private Sector Organizations. White papers submitted must be in response to a topic listed in the instructions on this page.

Information Related to the Broad Agency Announcement Open Solicitation

Halliburton building explosives facility in Nova Scotia

As reported by the CBC, International oil services company Halliburton is preparing to open an explosives storage facility in Nova Scotia’s Hants County next month. The location of the facility is the former barite mine, approximately two kilometres off the main road. It will be used to store explosives that are used in oil and gas exploration.

Natural Resources Canada’s (NRCan) Explosives Safety and Security Branch (ESSB) administers the Canadian Explosives Act and Regulations. Manufacturers, importers, exporters, transporters, sellers, or users of explosives are all subject to the Explosives Act and Regulations.

The buildings the explosives will be stored in are specially designed to help contain explosions.  Emily Mir, a spokesperson for Halliburton, said the facility will be comprised of several secured storage modules surrounded by a steel fence.

Explosives will be trucked from Halliburton’s Jet Research Center in Alvarado, Texas, to the Nova Scotia storage facility, where they will be stored until they’re needed at other locations in Eastern Canada. Explosives are used to create holes in the steel pipes at the bottom of exploration wells to allow oil or gas to flow into the pipe for extraction. They are also used to help remove pipes from wells when they are no longer in production.


The approximate location of a Halliburton storage facility that will begin operating at the end of February. – Google

Local politicians and residents have raised concerns about the facility and claim they have been kept in the dark about the construction and operation of the facility.

Abraham Zebian, the warden of the Municipality of the District of West Hants, said he was caught off guard by CBC’s questions about the project, as he had little information about it. But he said he does have concerns.

“That would be concerning to any resident, to have that in their backyard,” he said to the CBC. “Disasters ring a bell to me that have happened in Nova Scotia historically. That’s the first thing you start thinking about.”

The Barite mine where the explosives storage facility will located operated for approximately 40 years and used dynamite on a daily basis. An an unfortunate blast was made in one of the large fault zones in 1970 which resulted in flooding of the mine. It ended production 1978. During its operation it was Canada’s largest barite mine and one of the largest deposits in the world. 

The previous owner of the site had a tailings pond that overflowed into the Minas Basin. After Halliburton acquired the property they demolished the old buildings and built a safer berm around the tailings pond.

Ms. Mir told the CBC that the explosives will have the same grade of charges as those used in the mining industry. The amount of explosives stored on site will depend on demand, she said, adding that Halliburton expects to store substantially less than the company’s permit allows.

Legislation

Explosives are highly regulated by Natural Resources Canada under the Explosives Act and Regulations. Transportation of the explosives would need to conform with the federal Transportation of Dangerous Goods Act and Regulations. Ms. Mir said Halliburton received all necessary permits from Canada’s Department of Natural Resources – Explosives Regulatory Division for storage.

The Nova Scotia Environment Ministry, Margaret Miller, confirmed with the CBC that no provincial permits were required for the storage site.

The company did apply to Municipality of the District of West Hants and received a permit for the facility. The permit allows for an industrial accessory steel storage building for storage relating to future offshore oil and gas industry. The permit was issued Nov. 13, 2018, for a 16-foot by 60-foot single storage building.


The explosives storage facility is being built on a piece of property near Walton, N.S., that is owned by Halliburton. (Photo Credit: Robert Short/CBC)

​Ms. Mir said Halliburton has obtained all the necessary permits for the project from Natural Resources Canada as well as a building and development permit from the municipality.

The company said it has hired for three positions at the facility, which is expected to begin operations at the end of February.