SNC-Lavelin opens new London UK office to drive collaboration

Canadian construction, engineering and environmental services group SNC-Lavalin is to establish a new hub in London, UK.

Having completed the acquisition of British-based firm Atkins last summer (EA 04-Jul-17), the Montreal-headquartered firm is investing in the new office located in London’s Victoria, to support plans for growth in the UK market and continue its strong presence for the London clientbase, whilst also facilitating bringing together over 1,000 people from across SNC-Lavalin and its Atkins, Faithful+Gould and Acuity businesses into “a working space fit for the 21st Century”, it said.

Atkins president Nick Roberts said: “We’re focused on building a strong, unified and growing business in the UK. The decision to invest in a new UK hub in London is a positive statement from SNC-Lavalin about the significance of the UK to the company’s future aspirations. It provides a great foundation to further combine the market-leading strengths from our two organisations, and ensures we can continue to provide our clients with a high-quality customer experience and world-class project delivery.”

Philip Hoare, chief executive of SNC-Lavalin’s Atkins business in the UK & Europe, added: “We are striving to play our part in improving productivity and growth in the UK, as well as within our wider industry sector. A core component of this will be the digital transformation agenda, where more than ever innovation, collaboration and disruption will be key to success. Nova North [the new office] offers us a modern, efficient and flexible working environment in central London from where we can drive these efforts.”

How to Document Weights on Dangerous Goods/HazMat Transport Paperwork

International Air Transport Association (IATA), International Maritime Organization (IMO), Tile 49 of the U.S. Code of Federal Regulations (49 CFR), & Transportation of Dangerous Goods (TDG) Documentation

No one wants to talk about their weight. Ever. In the world of transport though, you have no choice. You are required to list on your transport paperwork some sort of weight, mass, or volume. The trick is to know which regulation requires what. Should be the net weight or gross weight? Is it per package or per packaging? Sadly, depending on the regulation, the answers to those questions may differ.

Before getting started, be sure you understand what all of those terms mean. I tend to default to the IATA regulations when it comes to definitions. These are found in Appendix A. Take note that these terms are also defined in the other regulations, too. In 49 CFR check in §171.9. For IMDG they are in 2 places – Volume 1, Chapter 1.2 and Volume 2, Appendix B. TDG defines them Part 1.4.

Definitions:

Package

The complete product of the packing operation consisting of the packaging and the contents prepared for transport.

Packaging

A receptacle and any other components or materials necessary for the receptacle to perform its containment function in conformance with the minimum packing requirements.

Means of containment

The road or railway vehicle, aircraft, vessel, pipeline or any other contrivance that is or may be used to transport persons or goods.

Net quantity (or weight)

The weight or volume of the dangerous goods contained in a package excluding the weight or volume of any packaging material; or the weight of an unpackaged article of dangerous goods (e.g. UN3166).

Gross weight (or gross mass)

The weight of a packaging plus the weight of its contents.

Now that we know or remember those specific terms, let’s see what each regulation has to say in regards to the paperwork. These are known as shipper’s declarations, dangerous goods form, shipping papers, or a transport document.

IATA – Section 8 Documentation:

For this regulation, a shipper needs to review §8.1.6.9.2. In particular, Step 6 paragraph (a) provides the information we need for our shipper’s declaration.  You are required to list the net quantity of dangerous goods in each package (by volume or weight as appropriate) for each item of dangerous goods that has a different UN/ID number, shipping name or packing group along with the appropriate units of measure.  Since this is an international regulation, those units must be in metric.

IATA does one step further. Certain entries of the Dangerous Goods List in the column for the maximum net quantity per package there will be the inclusion of the “G”. For example, look at ID8000 for Consumer Commodity or certain limited quantity listings. This “G” indicates the shipper must give the gross weight of each package. To avoid confusion for the carriers this “G” must also be included after the unit of measure.

IMDG – Chapter 5.4

Under IMDG, the weight description needed is in §5.4.1.5.1.  Here it says, the total quantity of dangerous goods covered by the description (by volume or mass as appropriate) for each item bearing a different proper shipping name, UN number or packing group shall be included. At the end of that section is the notation to specific the unit of measure and that abbreviations for those may be used.   Again, this is an international regulation, so the units must be metric.

Take note, the use of the word “shall” is a mandatory requirement.

49 CFR – §172.200 Subpart C for Shipping Papers:

In 49 CFR, or as most of us call it DOT, a shipper needs to read §172.202 paragraph (a) subparagraph (5) closely. Here you see the total quantity of the hazardous materials must be indicated (by mass or volume) and it must include an indication of the applicable unit of measure on a shipping paper. Interestingly enough, §171.10 says the unit of measure is to be compatible with international standards which is metric.

49 CFR lists the “customary” units in parentheses throughout but they are not the regulatory standard. We all know the US has yet to convert fully to the metric system. However, it is a good idea to make the changeover now when it comes to our hazardous materials’ shipping papers.

TDG – Part 3 Documentation:

Here a consignor (shipper) is in a unique situation.  Section 3.5 (1)(d) simply tells a consignor that for each shipping name, the quantity of dangerous goods and the unit of measure used to express the quantity must be on a shipping document.  It does go on to say the units used must be metric.  There is not a differentiation between net and gross mass for Canadian transport.

Keeping all of these requirements straight as a shipper making shipments via ground, air, ocean and between the US and Canada can be difficult. Notice I’ve included nothing about how explosives should be listed. They have their own set of rules in each regulation. Hopefully, this blog will clarify one part of your role as a shipper. If you ever have questions or find your self in need of training, reach to us today.

 

The article was first published on the Compliance Center website.

About the Author

Paula Reavis has the following degrees: BS in Science Education, BA in Chemistry, MA in School Counseling Certification.  She is also a National Certified Counselor.  Ms. Reavis has a teaching background and several years of experience in Hazard Communications. She is knowledgeable in HazCom2012, WHMIS (old/new), 49 CFR, IATA, IMDG and TDG. She started with the the Compliance Center in 2014, and is currently the Trainer. She is active in several associations including NACD, IHMM and SCHC where she served as chair of the Membership and Awards Committee. She is based in St. Louis, Missouri.

Job Opportunity: Coordinator of Emergency Planning, Toronto

Coordinator, Emergency Planning
Job Classification Title COORDINATOR EMERGENCY PLANNING PH
Job ID # 2300867 X
Division Public Health
Section Performance & Standards
Work Location 277 VICTORIA ST.
Job Stream Health
Job Type Permanent, Full-Time
Salary/Rate $94,421.60 – $110,929.00 / Year
Hours of Work (bi-weekly) 70.00
Shift Information Monday to Friday – 35 Hours
Affiliation Non-Union
Number of Positions Open 1
Posting Date 16-Apr-2018
Closing Date 30-Apr-2018
Job Description
 Major Responsibilities:

  • Develops and maintains components of the Toronto Public Health Emergency Plan and assigned emergency support functions, risk specific plans and other supporting documents, taking into consideration current developments within the programs, corporate policies and practices, legislation and initiatives by other levels of government.
  • Facilitates the promotion and implementation of a formalized risk management system and the setting of risk control measures and practices by operational areas through consistency in philosophical, policy and practical approaches across all risk frameworks.
  • Develops an annual risk management work plan, responds strategically to emerging business specific legislative, regulatory and policy changes by assessing the risk impacts on TPH processes and/or practices.
  • Ensures proper and consistent internal risk controls, system standards and policies and practices are maintained and that requirements are met.
  • Plans and delivers risk management training to Toronto Public Health staff.
  • Coordinates assigned projects, ensuring effective teamwork, communication practices and quality of work.
  • Participates on local, provincial and federal emergency planning committees/workgroups and maintains links with other key stakeholders in emergency planning, response and recovery activities.
  • Plan and delivers training to Toronto Public Health staff to ensure that they are prepared to respond to emergencies. Maintains a current database of training sessions attended by Toronto Public Health staff.
  • Participates with Toronto’s Office of Emergency Management to both develop and facilitate training for emergency responders, managers, supervisors and staff who may be called upon to assist and support the City in its response to an emergency, including city-wide emergency exercises.
  • Delivers presentations to internal and external audiences on emergency preparedness, response and recovery elements.
  • Develops materials and content for the Emergency Planning and Preparedness internet and intranet sites as communication vehicles to educate staff on emergency preparedness measures.
  • Identifies and develops business cases on logistical elements that are necessary for effective emergency response.
  • Prepares reports for Toronto Public Health and the Board of Health.
  • Conducts debriefings on major health events, drills and exercises and evaluates the response against the emergency plan.
  • Ensures work is undertaken in a manner that complies with and supports City compliance with the Ontario Occupational Health and Safety Act (OHSA), other relevant codes and regulations and City policies. The above reflects the general details considered necessary to perform the principle functions and shall not be construed as a detailed description of all the work requirements inherent in the job.

Key Qualifications:

  1. Recognized university degree preferably in Emergency Management, Environmental Health, or Nursing.
  2. Post-secondary education or the appropriate combination of skills and relevant experience in the field of risk management.
  3. Extensive experience in the development, implementation and evaluation of risk management methodologies and strategies.
  4. Experience in emergency planning; developing, implementing and evaluating emergency planning and preparedness programs.
  5. Experience in the development, implementation and evaluation of risk management methodologies and strategies.
  6. Experience leading and implementing change, including action planning to support the development and implementation of risk mitigation plans.
  7. Extensive experience in developing and delivering staff training.
  8. Familiar with all relevant legislation (Municipal/Provincial/Federal) relating to emergency management.
  9. Ability to establish, coordinate and maintain effective working relationships with internal and external partners including other levels of government, public and community agencies.
  10. Excellent analytical and organizational skills with the ability to work individually or in a multidisciplinary environment and meet deadlines.
  11. Effective written and oral communication skills, presentation and facilitation skills including clear language writing.
  12. Experience using a variety of computer applications including MSOffice, including Word, Excel and PowerPoint.
  13. Effective problem-solving and conflict management skills.
  14. Possession of a valid Class “G” Ontario Driver’s License and access to a vehicle.

Accommodation:  The City of Toronto is committed to fostering a positive and progressive workforce reflecting the citizens we serve. We provide equitable treatment and accommodation to ensure barrier-free employment in accordance with the Ontario Human Rights Code, Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act and the City of Toronto’s Accommodation Policy. You can request for accommodation related to the protected grounds at any stage of the City’s hiring process, i.e., application, assessment and placement.

If you are an individual with a disability and you need accommodation in applying for this position, please email us at application.accommodation1@toronto.ca, quoting the job ID #2300867 and the job classification title.

If you are invited to participate in the assessment process, we ask that you provide your accommodation needs in advance at that time. Please be advised that you may be requested to provide medical/other documentation to Human Resources to ensure that appropriate accommodation is provided to you throughout the hiring process.

To apply online, visit the Toronto website.

U.S. Environmental Industry generates $388 billion in revenues in 2017

The U.S. environmental industry generated revenues of $388 billion in 2017, up from $370 million in 2016, according to preliminary estimates by Environmental Business International Inc. (EBI), publisher of Environmental Business Journal (EBJ). The environmental industry’s annual growth rate of 4.8% in 2017 represents a steady increase from 3.6% in 2016 and 2.1% in 2015.

Every year, EBJ’s Annual Industry Overview presents estimates and forecasts for 13 business segments, in addition to offering perspective on how the environmental industry is responding to changing macroeconomic conditions and regulatory and policy trends. This year’s summary reviews conditions one year into the Trump Administration.

To purchase EBJ’s Annual Industry Overview and receive statistical summaries of the industry in 13 segments with multiple charts featuring revenues, growth, number of companies, forecasts, growth factors and revenue breakdowns by client, media and function, visit the EBI website.

Chemical and Biological Remediation Tetrachloroethene – Case Study

Tetrachloroethene is the systematic name for tetrachloroethylene, or perchloroethylene (“perc” or “PERC”), and many other names.  It is a manufactured chemical that is widely used in the dry-cleaning of fabrics, including clothes. It is also used for degreasing metal parts and in manufacturing other chemicals. Tetrachloroethene is found in consumer products, including some paint and spot removers, water repellents, brake and wood cleaners, glues, and suede protectors.

Tetrachloroethene is a common soil contaminant. With a specific gravity greater than 1, tetrachloroethylene will be present as a dense nonaqueous phase liquid(DNAPL) if sufficient quantities are released. Because of its mobility in groundwater, its toxicity at low levels, and its density (which causes it to sink below the water table), cleanup activities are more difficult than for oil spills (which has a specific gravity less than 1).

In the case study, researchers from Manchester Geomicro, a geo-microbiology and molecular environmental science research group affiliated with the University of Manchester, used combined chemical and microbiological contaminant degradation processes to remediate tetrachloroethene at a contaminated site in Germany.

In the study, the researchers used Carbo-Iron®, an applied composite material consisting of colloidal activated carbon and embedded nanoscale zero valent iron (ZVI). In a recent long term study of a field site in Germany, it was injected into an aquifer contaminated with tetrachloroethene (PCE). Carbo-Iron® particles accumulated the pollutants and promoted their reductive dechlorination via a combination of chemical and microbial degradation processes.

Schematic illustrating Carbo-Iron® particle structure and key chemical and microbial dechlorination pathways

The presence of the dominant degradation products ethene and ethane in monitoring wells over the duration of the study indicates the extended life-time of ZVI’s chemical activity in the composite particles. However, the identification of the partial dechlorination product cis-dichlorethene (cis-DCE) at depths between 12.5m and 25m below ground level one year into the study, suggested additional microbially mediated degradation processes were also involved.

Hydrogen produced by the aqueous corrosion of ZVI contributed to a decrease in the redox potential of the groundwater up to 190 days promoting organo-halide reducing conditions that lasted for months after. The long lasting reducing effect of Carbo-Iron® is crucial to efficiently supporting microbial dehalogenation, because growth and activity of these microbes occurs relatively slowly under environmental conditions. Detection of increased levels of cis-DCE in the presence of various organohalide reducing bacteria supported the hypothesis that Carbo-Iron® was able to support microbial dechlorination pathways. Despite the emergence of cis-DCE, it did not accumulate, pointing to the presence of an additional microbial degradation step.

The results of state-of-the-art compound specific isotope analysis in combination with pyrosequencing suggested the oxidative degradation of cis-DCE by microorganism related to Polaromonas sp. Strain JS666. Consequently, the formation of carcinogenic degradation intermediate vinyl chloride was avoided due to the sequential reduction and oxidation processes. Overall, the moderate and slow change of environmental conditions mediated by Carbo-Iron® not only supported organohalide-respiring bacteria, but also created the basis for a subsequent microbial oxidation step.

This study, published in Science of the Total Environment (Vogel et al. 2018, vol. 628-629, 1027-1036) illustrates how microbes and nanomaterials can work in combination for targeted remediation. The work was led by collaborators (Katrin Mackenzie and Maria Vogel) at the Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research in Leipzig, Germany, and adds to a growing portfolio of research highlighting the potential of Carbo-Iron® as an in situ treatment for contaminated groundwater.

 

Guideline for the Management of Sites Contaminated with Light Non-Aqueous Phase Liquids

Light Non-Aqueous Phase Liquid (LNAPL) Management is the process of LNAPL site assessment, monitoring, LNAPL Conceptual Site Model development, identification and validation of relevant LNAPL concerns, and the possible application of remediation technologies. The presence of LNAPL can create challenges at any site.  Examples of LNAPLs include gasoline, diesel fuel, and petroleum oil.

In 2009, the United States Interstate Technology and Regulatory Council (ITRC) published LNAPL-1: Evaluating Natural Source Zone Depletion at Sites with LNAPL (ITRC 2009b) and LNAPL-2: Evaluating LNAPL Remedial Technologies for Achieving Project Goals (ITRC 2009a) to aid in the understanding, cleanup, and management of LNAPL at thousands of sites with varied uses and complexities. These documents have been effective in assisting implementing agencies, responsible parties, and other practitioners to identify concerns, discriminate between LNAPL composition and saturation-based goals, to screen remedial technologies efficiently, to better define metrics and endpoints for removal of LNAPL to the “maximum extent practicable,” and to move sites toward an acceptable resolution and eventual case closure.

This guidance, LNAPL-3: LNAPL Site Management: LCSM Evolution, Decision Process, and Remedial Technologies, builds upon and supersedes both previous ITRC LNAPL guidance documents in an updated, web-based format. LNAPL-1 and LNAPL-2 are still available for review; however, LNAPL-3 is inclusive of those materials with new topics presented and previous topics elaborated upon and further clarified.

This guidance can be used for any LNAPL site regardless of size and site use and provides a systematic framework to:

  • develop a comprehensive LNAPL Conceptual Site Model (LCSM) for the purpose of identifying specific LNAPL concerns;
  • establish appropriate LNAPL remedial goals and specific, measurable, attainable, relevant, and timely (SMART) objectives for identified LNAPL concerns that may warrant remedial consideration;
  • inform stakeholders of the applicability and capability of various LNAPL remedial technologies
  • select remedial technologies that will best achieve the LNAPL remedial goals for a site, in the context of the identified LNAPL concerns and conditions;
  • describe the process for transitioning between LNAPL strategies or technologies as the site moves through investigation, cleanup, and beyond; and
  • evaluate the implemented remedial technologies to measure progress toward an identified technology specific endpoint.

Initial development and continued refinement of the LCSM is important to the identification and ultimate abatement of site-specific LNAPL concerns. Figure 1-1 identifies the stepwise evolution of the LCSM, the specific purpose of each LCSM phase, and the tools presented within this guidance to aid in the development of the LCSM. As depicted, the LCSM is the driving force for identifying actions to bring an LNAPL site to regulatory closure.

LNAPL remediation process and evolution of the LNAPL conceptual site model (LCSM).

This guidance document is organized into sections that lead you through the LNAPL site management process:

  • Section 2 – LNAPL Regulatory Context, Challenges, and Outreach
    Section 2 identifies some of the challenges implementing agencies face when investigating, evaluating, or remediating LNAPL sites. These challenges include regulatory or guidance constraints, a lack of familiarity or understanding of LNAPL issues, and poorly or undefined objectives and strategies. This section also stresses the importance of identifying and communicating with stakeholders early in the process in order to address issues or concerns that can lead to delays or changes in strategy. Understanding and recognizing these challenges and concerns during development of a comprehensive LCSM can help reduce costs and lead to a more effective and efficient resolution at an LNAPL site.
  • Section 3 – Key LNAPL Concepts
    Section 3 provides an overview of key LNAPL terminology and concepts including LNAPL behavior following a release to the subsurface (i.e., how LNAPL spreads away from the primary release point, its behavior above and below the water table, and how its migration eventually stops and naturally depletes). An understanding of these basic terms and concepts is crucial for developing a comprehensive LCSM and an effective LNAPL management plan.
  • Section 4 – LNAPL Conceptual Site Model (LCSM)
    The LCSM is a component of the overall conceptual site model (CSM), and emphasizes the concern source (i.e., the LNAPL) of the CSM. The presence of LNAPL necessitates an additional level of site understanding. The unique elements of the LCSM are presented as a series of questions for the user to answer to help build their site-specific LCSM. Ultimately, a thoroughly-developed, initial LCSM provides the basis for identifying the LNAPL concerns associated with an LNAPL release.
  • Section 5 – LNAPL Concerns, Remedial Goals, Remediation Objectives, and Remedial Technology Groups
    Section 5 describes the decision process for identifying LNAPL concerns, verifying concerns through the application of threshold metrics, establishing LNAPL remedial goals, and determining LNAPL remediation objectives. This section also introduces remedial technology groups, the concept of a treatment train approach, and how to transition between technologies to address the identified LNAPL concern(s) systematically and effectively. It is important to understand the content of this section prior to selecting and implementing an LNAPL remedial strategy.
  • Section 6 – LNAPL Remedial Technology Selection
    Section 6 describes the remedial technology screening, selection, and performance monitoring process. This section begins by identifying technologies recognized as effective for mitigating specific LNAPL concerns and achieving site-specific LNAPL remediation objectives based on the collective experience of the LNAPL Update Team. The LNAPL Technologies Appendix summarizes each of the technologies in detail and presents a systematic framework to aid the user in screening out technologies that are unlikely to be effective, ultimately leading to selection of the most appropriate technology(ies) to address the specific LNAPL concerns.

This guidance also includes relevant, state-of-the-science appendices for more detailed information on LNAPL specific topics:

  • LNAPL Technologies Appendix 
    This appendix describes in more detail each of the 21 LNAPL technologies introduced in the main document. The A-series tables describe information to evaluate the potential effectiveness of each technology for achieving LNAPL goals under site-specific conditions. Information includes the basic remediation process of each technology, the applicability of each technology to specific remedial goals, and technology-specific geologic screening factors. The B-series tables describe information to evaluate the potential implementability of each technology considering the most common site-specific factors. The C-series tables describe the minimum data requirements to make a final technology selection through bench-scale, pilot, and/or full-scale testing; they also describe metrics for tracking remedial technology performance and progress.
  • Natural Source Zone Depletion (NSZD) Appendix
    This appendix provides a technical overview of NSZD for LNAPL and the methods by which rates can be estimated and measured. It also provides a discussion of long-term LNAPL site management and how NSZD can be applied as a remedy including decision charts to support integration of NSZD and case studies demonstrating its use. For this document, the original ITRC NSZD document (ITRC LNAPL-1) was updated and incorporated into the main body and appendix.
  • Transmissivity (Tn) Appendix
    LNAPL transmissivity has application throughout the life cycle of a LNAPL project. This appendix provides an understanding of how transmissivity connects to the broader framework for LNAPL management including LNAPL recovery and mobility, and the potential for NSZD to decrease LNAPL transmissivity and mobility over time.
  • Fractured Rock Appendix
    This appendix describes the behavior and differences of how LNAPL behaves in fractured bedrock formations. While some of the same physical principles apply for multiphase flow in fractured aquifers as in porous aquifers, unique characteristics of finite and restricted fluid flow paths can lead to unexpected results in fractured settings.
  • LNAPL Sheens Appendix
    This appendix details how LNAPL sheens form, the concerns and challenges of sheens, and potential sheen mitigation technologies.

LNAPL Contamination of the Subsurface

IATA rolls out DG AutoCheck to enhance safety in dangerous goods transport

The International Air Transport Association (IATA) recently launched Dangerous Goods AutoCheck (DG AutoCheck), a new innovative solution for the air cargo industry, which will enhance safety and improve efficiency in the transport of dangerous goods by air, and support the industry’s goal of a fully digitised supply chain.

“The air transport industry handles over 1.25 million dangerous goods shipments transported every year. With the air cargo growth forecasted at 4.9 percent every year over the next five years, the number is expected to rise significantly. To ensure that the air cargo industry is ready to benefit from this growth, it needs to adopt modern and harmonised standards that will facilitate safe, secure and efficient operations, particularly in relations to carriage of dangerous goods. DG AutoCheck is a significant step towards achieving this goal,” said Nick Careen, senior vice president, airport, passenger, cargo and security, IATA.

FACILITATING ACCEPTANCE CHECKS

DG AutoCheck is a digital solution that allows the air cargo supply chain to check the compliance of the Shipper’s Declaration for Dangerous Goods (DGD) against all relevant rules and regulations contained in the IATA Dangerous Goods Regulations.

The tool enables electronic consignment data to be received directly, which supports the digitisation of the cargo supply chain. Optical Character Recognition (OCR) technology also transforms a paper DGD into electronic data. This data is then processed and verified automatically using the XML data version of the DGR.

DG AutoCheck also facilitates a ground handlers or airline’s decision to accept or reject a shipment during the physical inspection stage, by providing a pictorial representation of the package, with the marking and labelling required for air transport.

“The DGR lists over 3,000 entries for dangerous goods. Each one must comply with the DGR when shipped. The paper DGR consists of 1,100 pages. Manually checking each shipper’s declaration is a complex and time consuming task. Automation with DG AutoCheck offers us a giant step forward. The cargo supply chain will benefit from greater efficiency, streamlined processes and enhanced safety,” said David Brennan, assistant director, cargo safety and standards, IATA.

INDUSTRY COLLABORATION

Collaboration is critical in driving industry transformation, especially for a business with such a complex supply chain. DG AutoCheck is a good example of effective industry partnerships.

An industry working group made up of more than twenty global organisations supported the development of DG AutoCheck. The group comprises airlines, freight forwarders, ground handlers and express integrators, including Air France-KLM CargoSwissportPanalpina and DHL Express.

“The air cargo supply chain is currently undergoing a major digital evolution. Collaboration across the industry is essential if the goal of a digitised electronic end-to-end messaging platform is to be realised. There is no time to lose as there is a growing demand from our customers for efficiency of electronic documentation throughout the supply chain,” said Nick Careen, senior vice president, airport, passenger, cargo and security, IATA.

 

Microbial Biotechnology in Environmental Monitoring and Cleanup

A new book on the advances in microbial biotechnology in environmental monitoring and clean-up has just be published by IGI Global.  The book is part of the Advances in Environmental Engineering and Green Technologies Book Series.

In the book, the authors state that pollutants are increasing day by day in the environment due to human interference. Thus, it has become necessary to find solutions to clean up these hazardous pollutants to improve human, animal, and plant health.

Microbial Biotechnology in Environmental Monitoring and Cleanup is a critical scholarly resource that examines the toxic hazardous substances and their impact on the environment. Featuring coverage on a broad range of topics such as pollution of microorganisms, phytoremediation, and bioremediation, this book is geared towards academics, professionals, graduate students, and practitioners interested in emerging techniques for environmental decontamination.

This book is a collection of various eco-friendly technologies which are proposed to under take environmental pollution in a sustainable manner. the role of microbial systems has been taken as a tool for rapid degradation of xenobiotic compounds. Application of microbes as bio-inoculants for quality crop production has been emphasized by some authors. Conventional method of bioremediation using
hyper-accumulator tree species has been given proper weightage. The emerging role of nanotechnology in different fields has been discussed. The contents of book are organized in various sections which deal about microbial biodegradation, phytoremediation and emerging technology of nanocompounds in agriculture sector.

Chapter 18, which covers phytoremedation, acknowledges that environmental pollution with xenobiotics is a global problem and development of inventive remediationtechnologies for the decontamination of impacted sites are therefore of paramount importance.
Phytoremediation capitalizes on plant systems for removal of pollutants from the environment.  Phytoremediation is a low maintenance remediation strategy and less destructive than physical or chemical remediation.  Phytoremediation may occur directly through uptake,translocation into plant shoots and metabolism (phytodegradation) or volatilization (phytovolatilization) or indirectly through plant microbe-contaminant interactions within plant root zones(rhizospheres).  In recent years, researchers have engineered plants with genes that can bestow superior degradation abilities. Thus, phytoremediation can be more explored, demonstrated, and/or implemented for the cleanup of metal contaminants, inorganic pollutants, and organic contaminants.

Topics Covered

The 400-page, 20 chapter book covers many academic areas covered including, but are not limited to:

  • Bio-Fertilizers
  • Bioremediation
  • Microbial Degradation
  • Microorganisms
  • Organic Farming
  • Pesticide Biodegradation
  • Phytoremediation

 

 

U.S. DOD Rapid Innovation Fund for Innovative Technology in Emergency Response Tools

The United States Department of Defence (U.S. DoD) Rapid Innovation Fund facilitates the rapid insertion of innovative technologies into military systems or programs that meet critical national security needs. DoD seeks mature prototypes for final development, testing, evaluation, and integration. These opportunities are advertised under NAICS codes 541714 and 541715. Awardees may receive up to $3 million in funding and will have up to two years to perform the work. The two phases of source selection are (1) white paper submission and (2) invited proposal submission. The window of opportunity for submitting white papers expires on April 12, 2018 (due by 3:00 PM ET).
Among the numerous R&D opportunities described in the BAA are topics relevant to the development of environmental monitoring and emergency response tools:

  • Handheld automated post-blast explosive analysis device (USDR&E-18-BAA-RIF-RRTO-0001). Handheld automated detection and characterization of explosive residue collected on-scene after an explosion.
  • Handheld networked radiation detection, indication and computation (RADIAC) (DTRA-17-BAA-RIF-0004). A lighter, more compact system for integration into CBBNE situational awareness software architecture of Mobile Field Kit and Tactical Assault Kit.
  • 3-D scene data fusion for rapid radiation mapping/characterization (DTRA-17-BAA-RIF-0005).
  • Immediate decontamination (CBD-18-BAA-RIF-0001). A spray-on decontaminant that can be applied in a single step in ~15 minutes on hardened military equipment.
  • Hyperspectral aerial cueing for chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear and explosive (CBRNE) mobile operations (PACOM-18-BAA-RIF-0001). Real-time detection via drone.
  • Mobile automated object identification and text translation for lab equipment (DTRA-17-BAA-RIF-0003). A tool to help users recognize equipment, chemicals, and potentially hazardous material in real time.

https://www.fbo.gov/spg/ODA/WHS/REF/HQ0034-18-BAA-RIF-0001A/listing.html
[NOTE: This BAA was also issued as HQ0034-18-BAA-RIF-0001B.]

BC Ministry of the Environment: Staffing Announcement

The British Columbia Environment Ministry recently announced that Danielle Grbavac has been named as as Director, Land Remediation within the Environmental Emergencies and Land Remediation Branch, Environmental Protection Division, Ministry of Environment and Climate Change Strategy.

 

Danielle has 15 years of experience working in environmental science, including marine geoscience, coastal geomorphology, climate change and most recently contaminated sites, both for the provincial and federal governments. She holds a Bachelor of Science in Geography (hons) from the University of Victoria and a Master of Science in Environmental Geomorphology from the University of Oxford. She has also completed graduate level studies in public administration from the University of Victoria.

Before joining the BC public service, Danielle worked as a marine geoscientist for the Geological Survey of Canada. Since joining the ministry she has worked on regulatory development in the Climate Action Secretariat and issues management for BC Parks and the Conservation Officer Service. She joined the Land Remediation Section in 2015, as Operations Manager, leading a diverse team of professionals responsible for oversight of high risk site classification and site identification, as well as the development of policy for legislative and regulatory change and related guidance for BC’s site remediation program. Additionally, Danielle has held an associate faculty position at Royal Roads University for nearly a decade teaching in the School of Environment and Sustainability and the International Study Centre.

Danielle brings a wealth of knowledge and background, and great interpersonal skills to her new role. She is looking forward to identifying priorities for contaminated sites work after the recent standards updates in the Stage 10 & 11 Contaminated Sites Regulation amendments in November 2017. She intends to maintain and strengthen the ministry’s relationships with its partners and stakeholders within the contaminated sites community.