U.S. EPA Hazardous Waste Enforcement in Wisconsin

The United States Environmental Protection Agency (“U.S. EPA”) and Kerry Biofunctional Ingredients, Inc. d/b/a Kerry Bio Sciences (“Kerry”) recently entered a Consent Agreement (“CA”) addressing alleged violations of Subtitle C of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (“RCRA”) and its regulations implementing requirements for the management of hazardous waste. See Docket Number : RCRA-02-2017-7108.

Kerry is a subsidiary of Kerry, Inc. whose North American Headquarters is situated in Beloit, Wisconsin.

The CA provides that Kerry operates a facility in Norwich, New York (“Facility”) that has been a generator of hazardous waste.

As a result of the July 2016 inspection and Kerry’s response to the Request for Information, the Facility is alleged to have failed to:

  1. Make hazardous wastes determinations for certain waste-streams found at the Facility
  2. Keep a complete copy of each hazardous waste manifest for at least three years
  3. Meet the conditions necessary to accumulate hazardous waste without having obtained a permit or qualifying for interim status

Such alleged failures are stated to be violations of the RCRA regulations.

The CA assesses a civil penalty of $20,000.

A copy of the CA can be downloaded here.

Kerry Headquarters, Ireland

Activated Carbon-Based Technology for In Situ Subsurface Remediation

The U.S. EPA Office of Superfund Remediation and Technology Innovation recently published a fact sheet about an emerging remedial technology that applies a combination of activated carbon (AC) and chemical and/or biological amendments for in situ remediation of soil and groundwater contaminated by organic contaminants, primarily petroleum hydrocarbons and chlorinated solvents.  The technology typically is designed to carry out two contaminant removal processes: adsorption by AC and destruction by chemical and/or biological amendments.

With the development of several commercially available AC-based products, this remedial technology has been applied with increasing frequency at contaminated sites across the country, including numerous leaking underground storage tank (LUST) and dry cleaner sites (Simon 2015).  It also has been recently applied at several Superfund sites, and federal facility sites that are not on the National Priorities List.

The fact sheet provides information to practitioners and regulators for a better understanding of the science and current practice of AC-based remedial technologies for in situ applications. The uncertainties associated with the applications and performance of the technology also are discussed.

AC-based technology applies a composite or mixture of AC and chemical and/or biological amendments that commonly are used in a range of in situ treatment technologies.  Presently, five commercial AC-based products have been applied for in situ subsurface remediation in the U.S.: BOS-100® & 200® (RPI), COGAC® (Remington Technologies), and PlumeStop® (Regenesis) are the four most commonly used commercial products.  CAT-100® from RPI is the most recent product, developed based on BOS-100®.  One research group in Germany also developed a product called Carbo-Iron®.  The AC components of these products typically are acquired from specialized AC manufacturers.  These types of AC have desired adsorption properties for chlorinated solvents and petroleum hydrocarbons.  Different products also have different AC particle sizes, which determine the suitable injection approach and the applicable range of geological settings.

Example of powdered activated carbon “fracked” into the subsurface under high-pressure, causing preferential pathways into existing monitoring wells (Photo Credit: Regenesis)

 

In Situ Treatment Performance Monitoring: Issues and Best Practices

The U.S. EPA recently released an issue paper (EPA 542-F-18-002) that describes how in situ treatment technologies may impact sampling and analysis results.  The paper discusses the best practices to identify and mitigate issues that may affect sampling and analysis.

The utility of monitoring wells for performance or attainment monitoring is based on the premise that contaminant concentrations measured in the wells are representative of aquifer conditions. However, during in situ treatment, various biogeochemical and hydrogeological processes and sampling and analysis procedures may affect the representativeness of the monitoring well and sample quality, which may not be adequately considered in current remediation practice.

A properly designed monitoring network that anticipates the distribution of amendments after injection would minimize impacts to monitoring wells.  However, predicting amendment distribution prior to injection is challenging such that impacts to monitoring wells are likely.

The purpose of The U.S. EPA issue paper is to:
• describe how in situ treatment technologies may impact sampling and analysis results used to monitor treatment performance; and
• provide best practices to identify and mitigate issues that may affect sampling or analysis.

The U.S. EPA issue  paper discusses eight potential sampling or analytical issues associated with groundwater monitoring at sites where in situ treatment technologies are applied. These issues are grouped under three topic areas:
• Issues related to monitoring wells (Section 2).
• Representativeness of monitoring wells (Section 3).
• Post-sampling artifacts (Section 4).

The paper presents issues that pertain to collecting water samples directly from a monitoring well and does not discuss the use of other sampling techniques, such as passive diffusion bags or direct push groundwater sampling.

Pario Engineering & Environmental Sciences LP Opens Moncton Office

Pario Engineering & Environmental Sciences LP, a provider of specialized engineering and environmental services to the insurance and risk management industries, recently announced it has opened a new branch in Moncton, New Brunswick. It also announced that Steven Vidito has joined Pario as its Senior Geoscientist for Environmental Services, and will work out of the new Moncton location.

Aerial View of Downtown Moncton, New Brunswick

Mr. Vidito has over 25 years of experience and demonstrated success in the planning and execution of complex hydrogeological and environmental programs throughout Canada. He has extensive experience in contaminant hydrogeology, contaminated site assessment, soil and groundwater remediation, and regulatory compliance. He has coordinated and managed numerous environmental projects for a broad range of sites including residential, commercial, and industrial properties as well as federal facilities across Canada.

Additionally, Mr. Vidito has experience in providing senior technical oversight and peer review for reports and regulatory applications. His familiarity with the insurance industry will be a major asset in providing exceptional service to our clients. In the field, Mr. Vidito’s experience extends to on-site investigation, remediation, treat in-situ, treat ex-situ, containment procedures, risk evaluation, cost benefit analysis, and the execution of complex remedial projects.

Pario identified New Brunswick as a key location for those clients seeking environmental and forensic expertise. This location, along with the company’s current Halifax location, will serve Atlantic Canada, and many of Pario’s insurance and claims clients will now have local support to manage and control the costs of spill response along with mitigation of environmental liabilities.

Mr. Vidito will report to Brian Merrick, Director of Atlantic Canada. Mr. Merrick has been with Pario since 2007. He has over 22 years of experience, including senior technical and project management positions throughout Atlantic Canada.

“We are extremely pleased to be operating out of New Brunswick and to welcome Steven Vidito to the Pario team,” stated Martin Grech, Senior Vice President of National Operations. “As with all of our other locations, this new branch offers top talent with a continual emphasis on customer service. Mr. Vidito’s experience will be an ideal addition to our roster and we look forward to providing additional services to complement these strengths.”

Stantec acquires Quebec-based Cegertec

Stantec, a Canadian-headquartered international engineering and consultancy group, recently acquired acquired the Quebec-based consultancy Cegertec for an undisclosed amount. It comes within weeks of Stantec announcing the acquisitions of Calgary-based mining consultancy Norwest and UK specialist hydrogeological consultancy ESI.

Chicoutimi, Quebec

 

This latest target is a 250-person company providing engineering services to industrial, aluminium, mining, power and government clients across Canada and the United States. The firm operates from its headquarters in Chicoutimi but also boasts offices in Quebec City and Montreal with another due to open at St Georges in coming months.

 

In a press release, Stantec’s senior vice president for Quebec Isabelle Jodoin stated: “The acquisition of Cegertec is a sign of our continuing commitment to grow our expertise and diversify our operations in the Quebec market.  Our clients will now have access to a larger, comprehensive pool of resources, and a wide array of expertise and services under one banner, thanks to a combined team of 1,500 employees in Quebec.”

The acquisition is expected to close on the 25 May 2018.

Cegertec had previously explored partnership opportunities with other consultancies with its Saguenéenne engineering unit tied to WorleyParsons in a joint venture formed in 2012 to target mining, metals and oil and gas sectors. However, Cegertec bought out WorleyParsons’ stake in the JV last year returning decision making to its own management board.

Canadian National Brownfield Summit – June 13th 2018

Learning from the Past; Charting the Future
Attend Canada’s First Brownfield Summit, hosted by CBN

CBN is pleased to host the first-ever Brownfield Summit as this year’s edition of our annual conference. Join us in
Toronto June 13. The summit will feature:

  • Our popular Cross-country Check-up: a session on recent regulatory changes and an opportunity to learn about new initiatives from our panel of regulators
  • Legal Update: case law shapes our practice as brownfielders. This session will feature presentations on the most recent court cases affecting brownfields
  • Emerging Technology: focused presentations on the technological trends that will affect your brownfield practice today and in the future
  • NRTEE +15: the cornerstone of the Summit. Revisit the 2003 National Round Table on the Environment and the Economy (NRTEE) report as we find out what has worked, what still needs to be done, and what challenges are emerging. Then, join us in a discussion and determination of the brownfield agenda for the next few years

This will be a working event, so be prepared – bring the knowledge you’ve gained as a brownfield practitioner and your insights into brownfield redevelopment/reuse, roll up your sleeves and set the stage for the future of brownfields in Canada!

Register Today!

Ontario Transitioning Municipal Hazardous Waste Program

The Ontario Minister of the Environment and Climate Change recently issued direction to Stewardship Ontario (SO) to wind up the Municipal Hazardous or Special Waste Program by December 31, 2020. This wind up will allow the transition of materials collected under the program to individual producer responsibility under the Resource Recovery and Circular Economy Act, 2016.

The Minister’s letters can be found at:

Information related to the program wind up and future consultations will be posted to the Program Wind Up page when available. Until the wind up date, the Municipal Hazardous or Special Waste Program will continue to operate without disruption. This includes the operation of the Industry Stewardship Plans managed by the Automotive Materials Stewardship, the Product Care Association and SodaStream.

The Ontario Municipal Hazardous or Special Waste Program recycles or properly disposes of paint, antifreeze, batteries, fertilizers and other hazardous or special materials.  These wastes will continue to be managed in Ontario, but under a new program.  The winding down of the existing program is part of the provinces attempt to shift to a circular economy – a new waste management approach where waste is seen as a resource that can be recovered, reused and reintegrated into the production stream.

Ontario’s new waste management framework includes new legislation and a strategy to guide progress that will protect the environment, drive innovation, performance and competitiveness, and stimulate economic growth and development.

 

Environmental charges laid against Husky Energy Inc. and Husky Oil Operations Limited

Environment Canada and Climate Change (ECCC) recently laid a number of charges against Husky Energy Inc. and Husky Oil Operations Limited relating to the blended heavy crude-oil spill, in July 2016, which impacted the North Saskatchewan River, near Maidstone, Saskatchewan. The Government of Saskatchewan also filed a charge under the Environmental Management and Protection Act, 2010. These charges result from a 19-month joint federal-provincial investigation.

There are a total of ten charges which include one charge under subsection 36(3) of the federal Fisheries Act, one charge under subsection 38(5) of the federal Fisheries Act, six charges under subsection 38(6) of the federal Fisheries Act, one charge under the federal Migratory Birds Convention Act, 1994, and one charge under Saskatchewan’s Environmental Management and Protection Act, 2010.

The first appearance was at the end of March at the Lloydminster Provincial Court office.  According to the Premier of Saskatchewan’s office, the company faces a possible maximum $1 million fine.

Shoreline cleanup for the Maidstone-area oil spill (Jason Franson/Canadian Press)

Saskatchewan Minister of Environment Dustin Duncan said the spill led to significant changes in the provincial Pipelines Act; changes that include greater regulation, auditing powers, penalty provisions and licensing flowlines.

“We take this very seriously. There, to my knowledge, hasn’t been a charge with respect to the unintended release of oil from a pipeline in the province’s history,” he told reporters in late March.

Duncan said the site cleanup was completed by the end of last year, but Husky will have to work with the province’s Water Security Agency and the Ministry of Environment to make sure nothing else is required.  He said he expects full co-operation.

“In the last year, despite a very unsettling situation, Husky was very responsive when it came to the cleanup but also responding to the concerns by First Nations, by communities along the river, as well as to the requests that were made by the government department,” Duncan said.

All charges are currently before the Court, and they have not yet been proven. Under Canadian law, those charged are presumed innocent until proven guilty. Therefore, Environment and Climate Change Canada and Saskatchewan’s Water Security Agency, which has a responsibility for the specific charge under the provincial Environmental Management and Protection Act, 2010, will not be commenting further at this time.

 

New Brunswick Southern Railway pleads not guilty to charges related to oil transport

As reported by the CBC, New Brunswick Southern Railway has pleaded not guilty to 24 charges related to the transportation of oil.  Defence lawyer Catherine Lahey entered the pleas on the Irving-owned company’s behalf during a brief appearance in Saint John provincial court on earlier this month.

The charges against the railway, a subsidiary of J.D. Irving Ltd., stem from a Transport Canada investigation triggered by the 2013 derailment that killed 47 people in Lac-Mégantic, Que., prosecutors have said.  Twelve of the charges under the Transportation of Dangerous Goods Act relate to failing to create proper shipping documents for the purpose of transporting petroleum crude oil.  The other 12 charges relate to having unqualified personnel handling dangerous goods — crude oil.

The offences are all alleged to have occurred between Nov. 3, 2012, and July 5, 2013, at or near Saint John.  Irving Oil would have imported about 14,000 cars of crude for its Saint John refinery during that period.

New Brunswick Southern Railway is part if NBM Railways, a subsidiary of J.D. Irving Ltd., which also includes Cavendish Farms, Kent Building Supplies and Irving Pulp & Paper.

A trial date will be set on June 4.  Judge David Walker said the Crown is expecting to take about three weeks to present its case.  There is no word on how long the defence will take.  Pleas were delayed last month because the defence was still in the process of receiving an estimated 9,000 disclosure documents from the Crown.

The rail cars full of crude that exploded in Lac-Mégantic, Que., in July 2013 were destined for Irving Oil’s refinery in Saint John. (CBC)

In October 2017, Irving Oil was ordered to pay $4 million after pleading guilty to 34 charges under the same act.  Those charges related to failing to properly classify the crude oil it transported by train and inadequately training its employees in the transportation of dangerous goods.

The crude oil in the derailed rail cars that exploded in Lac-Mégantic was destined for Irving’s refinery in Saint John.

New Brunswick Southern Railway, along with its sister railways — Maine Northern Railway and Eastern Maine Railway — operates 883 kilometres of railway in New Brunswick and Maine.

New ASTM International standard supports hazardous materials packaging

A new ASTM International standard helps with pressure testing certain containers that are used to transport hazardous materials.  The standard will help meet requirements of entities that regulate and support global trade. According to ASTM International member Larry Anderson, current regulations are limited in describing how to perform such a test.

Specifically, the new test method provides instructions for performing hydrostatic pressure testing on intermediate bulk containers (IBCs). “This guide provides the detail on how to conduct pressure testing on IBCs and will provide a more consistent process for container manufacturers, test labs, and regulatory agencies,” says Anderson, who works at TEN-E Packaging Services, Inc., which assists companies with packaging testing and the certification of dangerous goods.

The new standard aims to help manufacturers pass performance tests and qualify their container designs to meet requirements of the U.S. Department of Transportation’s Title 49 Code of Federal Regulations, as well as the United Nations recommendations on the transport of dangerous goods.

The new standard (soon to be published as D8134) was developed by ASTM International’s committee on packaging (D10).