Canadian Brownfields Survey

The Canadian Brownfields Network (CBN), in conjunction with Ryerson University is conducting a survey on the perceptions of progress on recommendations that the National Roundtable on the Environment & Economy (NRTEE) released in 2003.

The CBN is most interested in knowing if persons involved in brownfield redevelopment feel if progress has been made on the NRTEE’s recommendations.

CBN and Ryerson have developed a survey for NRTEE +15 – have your say: . Survey results will form the basis of discussion at our 2018 Conference June 13. Please participate!

Possible benefits of participating in this study include that we aim to identify methods for increasing brownfields redevelopment activity in Canada, and encourage more involvement in brownfield redevelopment through comprehensive understanding of existing plans and policies.

Chemical Biological Radiological Nuclear and Explosives (CBRNE) Detection Equipment Market Outlook

Chemical Biological Radiological Nuclear and Explosives (CBRNE) Detection Equipment Market: Global Industry Trends, Market Size, Competitive Analysis and Forecast – 2018 – 2026”, this study is recently published by Research Corridor covering global market size for Chemical Biological Radiological Nuclear and Explosives (CBRNE) Detection Equipment market for the key segments and further cross-regional segmentation of these segments for the period 2018 to 2026.

According to Research Corridor this study will provide in-depth analysis of segments on the basis of current trends, market dynamics and country level analysis of Chemical Biological Radiological Nuclear and Explosives (CBRNE) Detection Equipment industry. This report provides market estimates and forecast for the period 2016-2026, along with respective CAGRs for each segment and regional distribution for the period 2018-2026. In depth analysis of competitive landscape, porter’s five forces model, value chain analysis, and pricing strategies are also covered in the report scope.

Report Synopsis: Chemical Biological Radiological Nuclear and Explosives (CBRNE) Detection Equipment Market

This report provides an exhaustive market analysis of the Chemical Biological Radiological Nuclear and Explosives (CBRNE) Detection Equipment industry presented through sections such as

  1. Chemical Biological Radiological Nuclear and Explosives (CBRNE) Detection Equipment: Market Summary
  2. Key Developments in the Chemical Biological Radiological Nuclear and Explosives (CBRNE) Detection Equipment Industry
  3. Market Trends and Dynamics of Chemical Biological Radiological Nuclear and Explosives (CBRNE) Detection Equipment Industry
  4. Attractive Investment Proposition for Chemical Biological Radiological Nuclear and Explosives (CBRNE) Detection Equipment Market
  5. Competitive Landscape of Key Market Players in Chemical Biological Radiological Nuclear and Explosives (CBRNE) Detection Equipment Industry
  6. Current Market Scenario and Future Prospects of the Chemical Biological Radiological Nuclear and Explosives (CBRNE) Detection Equipment Market
  7. Mergers and Acquisitions in Chemical Biological Radiological Nuclear and Explosives (CBRNE) Detection Equipment Market
  8. Chemical Biological Radiological Nuclear and Explosives (CBRNE) Detection Equipment Market Revenue and Forecast, by Segment A Type, 2016 to 2026
  9. Chemical Biological Radiological Nuclear and Explosives (CBRNE) Detection Equipment Market Revenue and Forecast, by Segment B Type, 2016 to 2026
  10. Chemical Biological Radiological Nuclear and Explosives (CBRNE) Detection Equipment Market Revenue and Forecast, by Segment C Type, 2016 to 2026
  11. Chemical Biological Radiological Nuclear and Explosives (CBRNE) Detection Equipment Market Revenue and Forecast, by Segment D, 2016 to 2026
  12. Chemical Biological Radiological Nuclear and Explosives (CBRNE) Detection Equipment Market Revenue and Forecast, by Geography, 2016 to 2026

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Key Takeaways:

  1. Market size and forecast of the Chemical Biological Radiological Nuclear and Explosives (CBRNE) Detection Equipment market for the period from 2016 to 2026
  2. Compounded annual growth rate (CAGR%) for each segment in several regional markets by year 2026
  3. Market share analysis combined with competitive landscape of key players
  4. Profiles of key market players covering overall business operations, geographic presence, product portfolio, financial status and news coverage

Forecast for the Global Market for Hazmat Packaging through to 2027

Hazmat packaging, also referred to as Hazardous Material packaging as emerged as an effective solution in the protective packaging segment. Hazmat packaging is meant for the storage of hazardous substances and material which needs to be transported across borders. Shipping of hazardous materials is not only considered dangerous but it also requires a lot of regulations and guidelines to be transported. To minimize the spilling and snapping cases of the packaged product, the global hazmat packaging market is gaining enormous traction in the global market during the forecast period.

According to a market report from Future Market Insights, the growth of the hazmat packaging market is expected to be mainly driven by the need for a safe and secure packaging for materials that need special handling. Moreover, since the non-compliance with the shipping regulations of hazardous materials is quite costly, all the end users prefer hazmat packaging in order to perfectly comply with the regulations.

Manufacturing activity and industrial output remains important to both the developed and the developing economies. In developing economies, increase in the consumption of end products due to change in living standard and growing income has created new market opportunities to evolve. However, in developed regions, the demand is considered to be fragmented as customers ask for variations and different types of products. Protective packaging service providers need to evaluate and fulfill the requirements of protection. Therefore, the hazmat packaging market, a part of protective packaging is widely dependent on the manufacturing industry.

Interactive packaging is a key trend prevailing in the global hazmat packaging market wherein track and trace labels are being used to track the shipment. Giving the end user a chance to directly interact with the packaging itself, is expected to ring in new opportunities of growth for the global hazmat packaging market.

Packaging type which is less in weight has led to the introduction of packaging types which is specific to the product being packaged, thus, customization according to the needs of the end users is expected to lead to new market avenues of growth for the global hazmat packaging market.

The global hazmat packaging market is segmented on the basis of product type, material type, application, and geography. On the basis of product type, the global hazmat packaging market is segmented into:Cans,Boxes,Cartons,Drums and Pails,Bottles.On the basis of material type, the global hazmat packaging market is segmented into:Plastics,Metal,Corrugated Paper. On the basis of application, the global hazmat packaging market is segmented into:Paints & Dyes,Industrial Chemicals,Lubricants & Oils.

On the basis of geography, the global hazmat packaging market is segmented into North America, Latin America, Middle East & Africa, Europe, and Asia Pacific. North America hazmat packaging market is expected to continue its dominance throughout the forecast period mainly attributed to well-established end user segments in the region.

On the other hand, the Asia Pacific hazmat packaging market is expected to expand at the highest CAGR due to rapid industrialization in key economies such as India and China. Middle East & Africa along with Latin America are together expected to witness growth at a sluggish pace due to slow paced development of end user industries in the key economies. Some of the key players operating in the global hazmat packaging market are The Cary Company, Uline Company, Hazmatpac, Inc., Bee Packaging, Air Sea Containers, Inc., BASCO, Inc., and LPS Industries, LLC.

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CHAR Technologies Acquires The ALTECH Group

The ALTECH Group of companies (“Altech”) and CHAR Technologies Ltd. (“CHAR”) are now working together!  CHAR Technologies Ltd. (TSXV:YES) has acquired The ALTECH Group in an effort to expand the offering of cleantech environmental technologies, including SulfaCHAR and CleanFyre.  The ALTECH Group provides environmental engineering solutions to industry in North America in the areas of air pollution control, industrial energy efficiency, and process water recycling.  The new combined entity provides cleantech solutions to industrial environmental engineering challenges.

CHAR currently produces SulfaCHAR®, a bio organic product, similar to activated carbon, competing on cost and performance with other air pollution control solutions.  SulfaCHAR is specially designed to remove hydrogen sulfide from renewable natural gas (ie. biogas from anaerobic digesters and landfill gas, as well as other contaminants from industrial air emissions).  CleanFyre® is an exciting new bio-coal product that is a cost effective substitute with similar energy potential to coal as a fossil fuel.  The major advantage of bio-coal is that it is Greenhouse Gas (GHG) neutral.  Companies replacing coal with CleanFyre will be eligible to earn GHG Credits in the fight for Climate Change.  This is an important product advancement in the fight to significantly reduce Greenhouse Gases.


The merged entity has over 30 years of experience throughout North America in delivering full-service engineering and turnkey technology installations to corporations interested in sustainable and cost effective solutions.  As the holder of a number of patents, ALTECH and CHAR have unique, cost effective solutions for effluent air and water problems.  The combined entity has the ability to design, fabricate, and install leading edge cleantech solutions, solving complex environmental problems in very cost effective ways.  As a group that is constantly innovating, this partnership of cleantech firms continues to develop and apply world class solutions that make sense from a cost savings point-of-view.






Mr. Alex Keen:

Mr. Andrew White:


Pond Technologies announces project at Markham District Energy

Pond Technologies Holdings Inc.  (TSX.V: POND) recently announced the shipment of its proprietary Matrix System to Markham District Energy Inc. (MDE).  The shipment marks the commencement of the first phase of a $16.8 Million project to convert CO2 emissions to valuable algae-based nutraceutical products.  Pond’s Matrix System optimizes algae strain selection through the analysis of its customer’s emissions.

Pond also announced the signing of an exclusive marketing agreement with MDE who will market and develop customer projects using Pond’s solution for the District Energy market worldwide. District Energy systems are a highly efficient way to provide power, heating and cooling to buildings in communities and campuses from central plants. Bruce Ander, MDE’s President & CEO, is a past Chair of the International District Energy Association that represents over 2,200 members in 26 countries.

“We are pleased and ready to move this project forward with Pond Technologies.  The technology represents a significant opportunity for Markham District Energy to lower our environmental footprint while repurposing greenhouse gas emissions to manufacture a valuable product.  As we gain operational experience with the Pond process, we are keen to share our story with our District Energy colleagues here and abroad.” Bruce Ander, President & CEO of Markham District Energy Inc.

Steve Martin, President & CEO of Pond Technologies Inc. commented, “We are very excited to be working with Markham District Energy on this landmark project and grateful for their help in propagating our solution to other District Energy utilities located around the world.”

About Markham District Energy (MDE)
MDE, an energy company owned by the City of Markham, is committed to continuing as a leading developer of municipally owned district energy systems providing strategic foundations for Markham’s Greenprint Sustainability Plan and economic development objectives. MDE owns and operates award-winning community energy systems serving buildings in the developing urban centres of Markham Centre and Cornell Centre.

Markham District Energy is a thermal energy utility owned by the City of Markham

About Pond Technologies:
Located in Markham, Ontario, Pond Technologies Holdings Inc. (Pond) has developed a proprietary growth platform that can transform carbon dioxide (CO2) from virtually any source into valuable bio-products.  Pond works with the cement, steel, oil and gas and power generation industries to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and generate new revenue streams.

Pond’s platform technology also includes the growth of algae superfoods for the nutraceutical and food additive markets.  Pond’s system is capable of growing many species of algae, including strains that produce anti-oxidants, omega-3 fatty acids, and protein for human and animal consumption.

Algae Carbon Capture system

Successful Demonstration of Enhanced Soil Vapour Extraction

Researchers at Integrated Science & Technologies Inc. recently presented the findings from a field demonstration project that showed that enhanced soil vapour extraction significantly reduced the concentration of 1,4-Dioxane in soil.

1,4-Dioxane is often called simple dioxane because the other dioxane isomers (1,2- and 1,3-) are rarely encountered.  1,4-Dioxane is a synthetic industrial chemical that is completely miscible in water.  It is used as a solvent for a variety of applications.  1,4-Dioxane is a likely contaminant at many sites contaminated with certain chlorinated solvents (particularly 1,1,1-trichloroethane [TCA]) because of its widespread use as a stabilizer for chlorinated solvents

With respect to remediation, some 1,4-dioxane can be removed from pore water found in the vadose zone (unsaturated zone) in the subsurface by conventional soil vapor extraction (SVE), remediation is typically inefficient.  SVE extracts vapors from the soil above the water table by applying a vacuum to pull the vapors out.

SVE is inefficient at removing 1,4-dioxane from pore water in the subsurface vadose zone.  1,4-dioxane has a low Henry’s Law constant at ambient temperature.  This means that there is a low concentration of dissolved 1,4-dioxane gas proportional to its partial pressure in the gas phase.

To enhance the extraction for 1,4-dioxane in the subsurface, the researchers used heated air injection and more focused SVE extraction (XSVE).  The pilot teste was conducted at the former McClellan Air Force Base located in the North Highlands area of Sacramento County, 7 miles (11 km) northeast of Sacramento, California.

Soil Vapor Extraction unit at former McClellan Air Force Base, Calif. (U.S. Air Force Photo by Scott Johnston)

The pilot test consisted for four peripheral heated air injection wells of the XSVE system surrounded a 6.1 m x 6.1 m x 9.1 m deep treatment zone with a central vapor extraction well.

Soil temperature measurements were taken during the pilot test.  Soil temperatures reached as high as ~90°C near the injection wells after 14 months of operation and flushing of the treatment zone with ~20,000 pore volumes of injected air.  Results post treatment showed dioxane reductions of ~94% and ~45% decrease in soil moisture.  See additional information in slides at .

AGAT Labs appoints New President and Chief Operating Officer

AGAT Labs recently announced the appointment of Marissa Reckmann to the position of President and Chief Operating Officer at AGAT Laboratories. In her new role, Marissa will be focused on ensuring the preservation of AGAT’s culture and values, including the company philosophies, mission statement and loyalty to all staff and clients.

Marissa Reckmann, B.Sc. (Honours), P.Chem.

Marissa graduated from Lakehead University with a B.Sc. (Honours) degree in Chemistry. Marissa joined AGAT in 2006 and quickly gained experience within each of the company’s geographic and diversified operating divisions. Her positions within AGAT took on new and increasing responsibilities as AGAT transitioned from a local laboratory to the most scientifically diversified laboratory in Canada. During her tenure at AGAT, Marissa gained experience in each of AGAT’s operating divisions and as the company expanded nationally Marissa’s leadership was instrumental in helping AGAT gain a solid footprint for our services from coast to coast in 43 locations. In her varied roles, Marissa was responsible for ensuring overall national coordination of AGAT’s goals and objectives within each of the operating units across Canada. Marissa has proven herself to be a strongly dedicated leader, holding the best interests of her clients and colleagues, while serving to enhance communications and advance scientific services, quality and best business practices.

Marissa is currently President of the Canadian Land Reclamation Association – Alberta Chapter and a member of the Board of Directors of the National Canadian Land Reclamation Association.

Five New U.S. Hazmat Rules to Look for in 2018

By Roger Marks, Lion Technology Inc.

Ask a U.S. dangerous goods (DG) professional to name the most challenging part of his or her job, and you’re likely to hear about dense regulatory standards that overlap and seem to change on a near daily basis.

As dangerous goods shippers, freight forwarders, and carriers roll into 2018, new rules for hazmat air and vessel shipments are already in effect.  In addition, U.S. DOT’s Pipeline and the U.S. Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA) plans to start finalizing new hazmat rules as soon as February 2018.

Here, we’ll review the new U.S. DG air and vessel requirements that are mandatory now and review five new or changing U.S. DOT hazmat rules most likely to hit the books as Final Rules this year.

New IATA DGR Rules for Air Shippers

For hazmat air shippers, the 59th Edition of the International Air Transport Association’s Dangerous Goods Regulations, or IATA DGR, is in effect as of January 1, 2018.  The 59th Edition of the IATA DGR includes stricter requirements for lithium batteries shipped by air, a re-ordered list of Class 9 materials in Subsection 3.9.1, and a new Appendix I that details changes planned for air shippers in 2019.

Just before January 1st, IATA published the first Addendum to the 2018 DGR, which includes additional updates for air shippers and airline passengers.  IATA uses these addendums to make ongoing revisions to the current DGR before the publication of the next edition.

2016 IMDG Code Mandatory as of January 1st

Compliance with the latest International Maritime Dangerous Goods Code, or IMDG Code, is also mandatory as of January 1.  Updates made in the 2016 edition, compliance with which was voluntary throughout last year, are now officially in force.  These include new dangerous goods marking and labeling criteria; new packing instructions for certain shipments of engines, lithium batteries, and aerosols; and adjustments to the IMDG Code Dangerous Goods List.

The U.S. DOT, along with other federal agencies, recently released a semiannual agenda of rulemaking activities, many of which will impact hazardous materials professionals in 2018. The five rulemakings below, in progress now, are all scheduled to be published as final rules before Fall 2018.

  1. Enhanced Safety Provisions for Lithium Batteries by Air (RIN 2137-AF20

Expected in February 2018, this Interim Final Rule will harmonize the 49 CFR hazmat regulations with evolving international standards for shipping lithium batteries by air.  International requirements already in effect under the latest IATA DGR will now be adopted into 49 CFR and include:

  • Prohibiting lithium-ion cells and batteries as cargo on passenger aircraft;
  • Limiting state-of-charge to 30%; and
  • Limiting the use of alternate provisions for small cells or batteries by air.

Lithium battery requirements are one area of the hazmat regulations that have changed rapidly in the past decade and will continue to evolve as regulators and industry learn more about the potential and hazards of these batteries.

Melted mobile phone caused from lithium battery explosion

  1. Response to Industry Petitions—RIN 2137-AF09

Under regulations found at U.S. 49 CFR 106.95, interested parties may petition US DOT to amend, remove, or add hazmat regulations to enhance safety, streamline the CFR text, or boost efficiency for shippers and carriers.  In 2018, PHMSA plans to address 19 such petitions from hazmat stakeholders to provide clarification and/or relief within the hazmat shipping regulations.

Petitions to be addressed include an increase to the service life of certain hazmat tank cars and removing the emergency response number requirement for shipments of excepted quantities of hazardous materials.

This final rule is also expected in February 2018.

  1. Miscellaneous Amendments Pertaining to DOT Specification Cylinders (RIN 2137-AE80)

The U.S. DOT will address various petitions from industry stakeholders pertaining to the manufacture, maintenance, and use of DOT specification cylinders.  The rulemaking will also incorporate two existing hazmat special permits into the U.S. 49 CFR Hazardous Materials Regulations (HMR).

DOT expects to issue this final rule in April 2018.

 EPA’s Electronic Hazardous Waste Manifest System

Technically speaking, this one is a U.S. EPA rulemaking — but it does have consequences for hazmat shippers.  The Hazardous Waste Manifest is a shipping paper required for the transport of hazardous waste, and hazardous waste is regulated in transport as a hazardous material by US DOT.

On January 3rd, 2018, the U.S. EPA published a final rule to guide the process of setting and collecting fees from users of the electronic Manifest system.  Rollout of the long-planned e-Manifest system will begin in earnest on June 30th of this year, when the U.S. EPA plans to implement the system for collecting domestic hazardous waste manifests and domestic shipments of State-only regulated hazardous wastes.

As for how it will work, the U.S. EPA has determined that charging user fees to treatment, storage, and disposal facilities (TSDFs) and State-only waste receiving facilities is “the most effective and efficient means” of collecting user fees to fund the administration of the e-Manifest system.

  1. Oil Spill Response Plans for High-Hazard Flammable Trains

    High Hazard Flammable Train

    (RIN 2137-AF08)

This year, the U.S. DOT will promulgate a Final Rule to expand the applicability of oil spill response plans for trains transporting Class 3 flammable liquids in certain volumes and orientations across the train.

The bolstered requirements will apply to High-Hazard Flammable Trains, or HHFTs. A “High-Hazard Flammable Train” is a train carrying 20 cars of a Class 3 flammable liquid in a continuous block or 36 or more such cars across the entire train. Crude oil production and transport volumes have risen significantly in the past decade:  In 2009, 10,800 rail car loads of crude oil traveled by Class I railroad.  By 2015, that number had skyrocketed to over 400,000.1

The U.S. DOT plans to issue this final rule in July 2018.

These likely won’t be the only changes for U.S. hazmat shippers in 2018.  But, by identifying the future regulations or updates that may impact operations, shippers, brokers, and carriers can avoid confusion and panic when DOT finalizes the new rules.



  • *See 79 FR 45019


About the Author

Roger Marks is a researcher and writer at Lion Technology Inc., a provider of 49 CFR, IATA DGR, and IMDG Code dangerous goods training in the US.  Now in his 7th year at Lion, Roger creates content to inform and empower EHS professionals, and closely monitors developing regulatory actions that impact hazmat shipping, hazardous waste management, environmental compliance, and OSHA workplace safety.  Find nationwide public workshops, 24/7 online training solutions, and live webinars at

This article is republished and first appeared on OHS Online.


U.S. EPA Releases Annual Enforcement Statistics

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) recently released its annual environmental enforcement report.  In its report, which covers prosecutions for the 2016-2017 fiscal year (ending September 30th 2017), the U.S. EPA states that nearly $5 billion (U.S.) had been levied out in criminal fines and civil penalties.  It also stated that enforcement actions have also led to the commitment by companies to clean-up contaminated sites across the U.S.

In contrast, Canada does not issue an annual enforcement report.  However, the total sum of announced penalties by the Canadian federal government totaled approximately $15 million in 2017.

The bulk of the monetary fines levied in the U.S. was from the settlement with Volkswagen.  The company agreed to pay $1.45 billion (U.S.) in civil penalties because of its use of illegal software to foil emissions testing.

The U.S. EPA was alerted by an environmental activist group, The International Council on Clean Transportation in 2013 that on-road emission tests of Volkswagen vehicles were dramatically different than off-road test in garages.  The finding led U.S. EPA officials to discover that Volkswagen had installed software in vehicles to shut off the emissions control system during driving and only turned it on during off-road testing.

A worker tests a red 2016 Volkswagen AG Golf TDI emissions certification vehicle on Sept. 22, 2015. (Photo Credit: Patrick T. Fallon/Bloomberg News)

The $1.45 billion fine levied against Volkswagen still dwarfs the $6 billion penalty paid by BP for the 2010 oil spill from Horizon One oil rig in the Gulf of Mexico.

In contrast, the largest fine ever meted out in Canada was $3.5 million (Cdn.) to Prairie Mines & Royalty ULC in 2017 wastewater spill at a mine.

Included in the report, was the note of the legal commitment made by companies clean-up sites they had contaminated.  The estimated cost of that clean-ups is $1.2 billion (U.S.).

With respect to jail time for environmental criminals, the U.S. EPA prosecuted individuals and U.S. courts meted out a total of 150 years in jail for persons found guilty of environmental offences.  In contrast, the total jail time Canadian courts meted out for environmental offenders was less than one year.

Critics of the U.S. EPA note that the high level of enforcement actions may not continue.  Critics point to an analysis by the New York Times in late 2017 that concluded that the U.S. EPA under its latest head, Scott Pruitt, has initiated about one-third fewer civil enforcement cases than the number under the previous U.S. EPA director.

TRC enters Canadian Oil & Gas Market and expands existing Infrastructure Practice

TRC Companies Inc. (a U.S. based engineering, environmental consulting and construction-management services) recently announced that it will expand its footprint in Canada in 2018 to take advantage of a rebounding oil and gas market and the country’s increased infrastructure spending.

“The time is right for us to grow our business in Canada and bring more of our unique services and solutions to clients there,” said CEO Chris Vincze.  “We already have a strong infrastructure practice in Canada, and we plan to build upon our existing relationships with a number of Canadian clients for whom we’ve done work in the United States.”

Photo Credit: Transcanada

TRC has hired Michael Koski to spearhead its expansion in Canada.  He will serve as senior vice president of Canadian operations.

“Mike brings a unique blend of engineering, construction, environmental and regulatory skills to the table and will quickly help us scale up operations,” said Ed Wiegele, president of TRC’s oil and gas sector. “Plus he has extensive experience in the Canadian oil and gas market and excellent command of Canada’s regulatory environment.”

Koski, who grew up in Thunder Bay, Ontario, has spent three decades working in the oil and gas sector and has considerable experience with project management, engineering and environmental issues. He is an expert in pipeline routing and has provided expert testimony on the subject, served on technical panels and presented at industry conferences. He has also authored several manuals on the topic for government and industry.

“I look forward to expanding TRC’s services into Canada across all business sectors,” said Koski.  “Companies in Canada are clamoring for the integrated approach, advanced technologies and laser-like focus on client needs that TRC’s is known throughout the industry for.”

TRC already has strong relationships with a number of large Canadian firms, including TransCanada, Enbridge, Kinder Morgan and Canadian National Railway. It has also done a number of infrastructure projects across the country, including locomotive fueling facilities, power distribution system upgrades, capital improvement planning projects and wastewater treatment plants.

About TRC

TRC is a global engineering, environmental consulting and construction management firm that provides integrated services to the energy, environmental, infrastructure and pipeline services markets. TRC serves a broad range of commercial, industrial and government clients, implementing complex projects from initial concept to delivery and operation.