MOECC Releases Notice of Updated Excess Soil Management Proposal

The Ontario Ministry of Environment and Climate Change (MOECC) recently posted notice on the Environmental Bill of Rights Environmental Registry of the regulatory changes to the management of excess soil (Excess Soil Management Regulatory Proposal, ERO# 013-2774). Excess soil is soil that has been dug up, such as during excavation activities, and cannot be reused at its original site and must be moved off site.  There is much controversy in the Province of Ontario and other provinces concerning the management of excess soil as there are claims and growing evidence that some companies mix clean soil with contaminated soil, some companies dispose of contaminated soil as clean soil, and other questionable practices.

The MOECC proposal clarifies where soils can be reused based on the soil characterization and aims to reduce greenhouse gasses from the transportation of soil by encouraging local reuse. The proposal also clarifies that the project leader is responsible for the management and relocation of the excess soil generated during a project to ensure proper characterization and relocation. Minor amendments to O.Reg. 153/04 and to O. Reg. 347 are also proposed.

The current proposal incorporates responses and comments from the previous proposal as well as from engagement with stakeholders and Indigenous communities. Changes from the previous proposal include:

  • A revised approach to waste designation
  • Reduced regulatory complexity and some details moved to guidance
  • A two to three years transition time for key regulations
  • Several O. Reg. 153/04 amendments to come into effect sooner
  • More flexibility for reuse through new reuse standards and a Beneficial Reuse Assessment Tool to develop site specific standards

This proposal is part of the MOECC’s response to the commitments outlined in Ontario’s Excess Soil Management Policy Framework. Other actions of the framework include developing priority education, outreach and training initiatives to support implementation.

The specific regulations and proposals provided for comments are summarized below:

  • A new proposed On-Site and Excess Soil Management Regulation
    • Excess soil would be designated as waste when it leaves the project area unless it is reused in accordance with the rules set out in this regulation.
    • If designated waste, the regulation would clarify when an ECA is not required.
    • Hauling of excess soil would generally not need an ECA, but is still subject to certain rules, such as maintaining records.
    • Project leaders may use temporary soil storage sites without an ECA as long as certain conditions are met.
    • Unless exempted, a project leader is responsible for preparing an Excess Soil Management Plan (ESMP), which involves determining contaminant concentrations on the soil, finding appropriate receiving sites, develop a tracking system and record keeping requirements.
    • Key information from the ESMP would be registered on a public registry. A qualified person (QP) would need to prepare or supervise the ESMP.
    • The regulation would be phased in over two to three years.
  • Amendments to O. Reg. 153/04
    • Align the requirements for soil being taken to Record of Site Condition (RSC) or phase two properties with the new rules for excess soil proposed in the On-Site and Excess Soil Management Regulation.
    • Resolve delineation challenges experienced at properties going through the Risk Assessment process.
    • Remove Record of Site Condition triggers for low risk projects.
    • Provide flexibility for meeting contamination standards where exceedances are cause by substances used for ice and snow safety, discharges of treated drinking water, and presence of fill that matches local background levels.
  • Amendments to O. Reg. 347
    • Clarify that excess soil is no longer part of the definition of “inert fill.”
    • Clarify operational requirements to support exemptions from ECA requirements for excess soil related activities.
  • Proposal of Rules for On-site and Excess Soil Management
    • A proposed document to be adopted by reference in the On-Site and Excess Soil Management Regulation
    • Specifies ESMP contents, including an assessment of past uses, sampling and analysis plan, excess soil characterization, requirements for excess soil tracking systems, a destination assessment and identification, and declarations required of the project leader and qualified person, and applicable soil quality standards and related rules.
  • The proposed “Beneficial Reuse Assessment Tool” (BRAT)
    • An alternative rules that aim to promote greater reuse of excess soil and the protection of human health and the environment
    • Allows a QP to generate site specific standards using a spreadsheet model

Comments can be made on the proposal up to June 15, 2018 on the Environmental Registry of Ontario proposal site or by mail.

Pulp Mill in British Columbia fined $900K for releasing deleterious effluent

The Mackenzie Pulp Mill Corporation recently pleaded guilty, in the Provincial Court of British Columbia, to depositing a deleterious substance into water frequented by fish, in violation of the pollution-prevention provisions of the Fisheries Act.  The company was ordered to pay a penalty of $900,000, which will be directed to the federal Environmental Damages Fund.  This funding is to be used for the conservation of fish or fish habitat in the Omineca region of British Columbia. The company was also ordered to complete an independent audit of its operations to prevent future incidents of this kind.

The offence relates to incidents in July 2014 and September 2016, when effluent discharging from the Mackenzie Pulp Mill was found to be deleterious to fish. Environment and Climate Change Canada enforcement officers investigated the incidents, and their investigation revealed that the mill’s treatment system had not properly treated the effluent before discharging it, due in part to improper management of the wastewater entering the treatment system. The effluent was deposited into Williston Lake, which is frequented by fish.

As a result of this conviction, the company’s name will be added to the Environmental Offenders Registry.  The Environmental Offenders Registry contains information on convictions of corporations registered for offences committed under certain federal environmental laws.

Environmental Fine of $100,000 for Gas Bar Owner in Big River, Saskatchewan

Big River First Nation was recently sentenced to pay a fine of $100,000 in the Provincial Court of Saskatchewan for failing to comply with an environmental protection compliance order concerning the Miami Gas Bar, a company owned and operated by the Big River First Nation. An environmental protection compliance order is an order under the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999, which directs various measures be taken to stop or prevent a violation of the Act or its regulations.

The conviction stems a 2014 inspection by Officers from Environment Canada and Climate Change (ECCC) to verify compliance with the Storage Tank Systems for Petroleum Products and Allied Petroleum Products Regulations under the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999.  As a result of the investigation, the ECCC Officers issued an environmental protection compliance order. Charges were subsequently laid when the compliance order was not followed.  In court, Big River First Nation pleaded guilty to failing to comply with measures identified in the order.

The Storage Tank Systems for Petroleum Products and Allied Petroleum Products Regulations aim to reduce the risk of spills and leaks of petroleum products from storage tank systems, which can contaminate soil and groundwater. The Regulations apply to storage tank systems operated by a federal department, board, agency, or Crown corporation; storage tank systems providing services to federal works or undertakings that are a port authority, airport, or railway; and storage tank systems located on federal or Aboriginal lands.

U.S. EPA Hazardous Waste Enforcement in Wisconsin

The United States Environmental Protection Agency (“U.S. EPA”) and Kerry Biofunctional Ingredients, Inc. d/b/a Kerry Bio Sciences (“Kerry”) recently entered a Consent Agreement (“CA”) addressing alleged violations of Subtitle C of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (“RCRA”) and its regulations implementing requirements for the management of hazardous waste. See Docket Number : RCRA-02-2017-7108.

Kerry is a subsidiary of Kerry, Inc. whose North American Headquarters is situated in Beloit, Wisconsin.

The CA provides that Kerry operates a facility in Norwich, New York (“Facility”) that has been a generator of hazardous waste.

As a result of the July 2016 inspection and Kerry’s response to the Request for Information, the Facility is alleged to have failed to:

  1. Make hazardous wastes determinations for certain waste-streams found at the Facility
  2. Keep a complete copy of each hazardous waste manifest for at least three years
  3. Meet the conditions necessary to accumulate hazardous waste without having obtained a permit or qualifying for interim status

Such alleged failures are stated to be violations of the RCRA regulations.

The CA assesses a civil penalty of $20,000.

A copy of the CA can be downloaded here.

Kerry Headquarters, Ireland

Activated Carbon-Based Technology for In Situ Subsurface Remediation

The U.S. EPA Office of Superfund Remediation and Technology Innovation recently published a fact sheet about an emerging remedial technology that applies a combination of activated carbon (AC) and chemical and/or biological amendments for in situ remediation of soil and groundwater contaminated by organic contaminants, primarily petroleum hydrocarbons and chlorinated solvents.  The technology typically is designed to carry out two contaminant removal processes: adsorption by AC and destruction by chemical and/or biological amendments.

With the development of several commercially available AC-based products, this remedial technology has been applied with increasing frequency at contaminated sites across the country, including numerous leaking underground storage tank (LUST) and dry cleaner sites (Simon 2015).  It also has been recently applied at several Superfund sites, and federal facility sites that are not on the National Priorities List.

The fact sheet provides information to practitioners and regulators for a better understanding of the science and current practice of AC-based remedial technologies for in situ applications. The uncertainties associated with the applications and performance of the technology also are discussed.

AC-based technology applies a composite or mixture of AC and chemical and/or biological amendments that commonly are used in a range of in situ treatment technologies.  Presently, five commercial AC-based products have been applied for in situ subsurface remediation in the U.S.: BOS-100® & 200® (RPI), COGAC® (Remington Technologies), and PlumeStop® (Regenesis) are the four most commonly used commercial products.  CAT-100® from RPI is the most recent product, developed based on BOS-100®.  One research group in Germany also developed a product called Carbo-Iron®.  The AC components of these products typically are acquired from specialized AC manufacturers.  These types of AC have desired adsorption properties for chlorinated solvents and petroleum hydrocarbons.  Different products also have different AC particle sizes, which determine the suitable injection approach and the applicable range of geological settings.

Example of powdered activated carbon “fracked” into the subsurface under high-pressure, causing preferential pathways into existing monitoring wells (Photo Credit: Regenesis)

 

In Situ Treatment Performance Monitoring: Issues and Best Practices

The U.S. EPA recently released an issue paper (EPA 542-F-18-002) that describes how in situ treatment technologies may impact sampling and analysis results.  The paper discusses the best practices to identify and mitigate issues that may affect sampling and analysis.

The utility of monitoring wells for performance or attainment monitoring is based on the premise that contaminant concentrations measured in the wells are representative of aquifer conditions. However, during in situ treatment, various biogeochemical and hydrogeological processes and sampling and analysis procedures may affect the representativeness of the monitoring well and sample quality, which may not be adequately considered in current remediation practice.

A properly designed monitoring network that anticipates the distribution of amendments after injection would minimize impacts to monitoring wells.  However, predicting amendment distribution prior to injection is challenging such that impacts to monitoring wells are likely.

The purpose of The U.S. EPA issue paper is to:
• describe how in situ treatment technologies may impact sampling and analysis results used to monitor treatment performance; and
• provide best practices to identify and mitigate issues that may affect sampling or analysis.

The U.S. EPA issue  paper discusses eight potential sampling or analytical issues associated with groundwater monitoring at sites where in situ treatment technologies are applied. These issues are grouped under three topic areas:
• Issues related to monitoring wells (Section 2).
• Representativeness of monitoring wells (Section 3).
• Post-sampling artifacts (Section 4).

The paper presents issues that pertain to collecting water samples directly from a monitoring well and does not discuss the use of other sampling techniques, such as passive diffusion bags or direct push groundwater sampling.

Pario Engineering & Environmental Sciences LP Opens Moncton Office

Pario Engineering & Environmental Sciences LP, a provider of specialized engineering and environmental services to the insurance and risk management industries, recently announced it has opened a new branch in Moncton, New Brunswick. It also announced that Steven Vidito has joined Pario as its Senior Geoscientist for Environmental Services, and will work out of the new Moncton location.

Aerial View of Downtown Moncton, New Brunswick

Mr. Vidito has over 25 years of experience and demonstrated success in the planning and execution of complex hydrogeological and environmental programs throughout Canada. He has extensive experience in contaminant hydrogeology, contaminated site assessment, soil and groundwater remediation, and regulatory compliance. He has coordinated and managed numerous environmental projects for a broad range of sites including residential, commercial, and industrial properties as well as federal facilities across Canada.

Additionally, Mr. Vidito has experience in providing senior technical oversight and peer review for reports and regulatory applications. His familiarity with the insurance industry will be a major asset in providing exceptional service to our clients. In the field, Mr. Vidito’s experience extends to on-site investigation, remediation, treat in-situ, treat ex-situ, containment procedures, risk evaluation, cost benefit analysis, and the execution of complex remedial projects.

Pario identified New Brunswick as a key location for those clients seeking environmental and forensic expertise. This location, along with the company’s current Halifax location, will serve Atlantic Canada, and many of Pario’s insurance and claims clients will now have local support to manage and control the costs of spill response along with mitigation of environmental liabilities.

Mr. Vidito will report to Brian Merrick, Director of Atlantic Canada. Mr. Merrick has been with Pario since 2007. He has over 22 years of experience, including senior technical and project management positions throughout Atlantic Canada.

“We are extremely pleased to be operating out of New Brunswick and to welcome Steven Vidito to the Pario team,” stated Martin Grech, Senior Vice President of National Operations. “As with all of our other locations, this new branch offers top talent with a continual emphasis on customer service. Mr. Vidito’s experience will be an ideal addition to our roster and we look forward to providing additional services to complement these strengths.”

Stantec acquires Quebec-based Cegertec

Stantec, a Canadian-headquartered international engineering and consultancy group, recently acquired acquired the Quebec-based consultancy Cegertec for an undisclosed amount. It comes within weeks of Stantec announcing the acquisitions of Calgary-based mining consultancy Norwest and UK specialist hydrogeological consultancy ESI.

Chicoutimi, Quebec

 

This latest target is a 250-person company providing engineering services to industrial, aluminium, mining, power and government clients across Canada and the United States. The firm operates from its headquarters in Chicoutimi but also boasts offices in Quebec City and Montreal with another due to open at St Georges in coming months.

 

In a press release, Stantec’s senior vice president for Quebec Isabelle Jodoin stated: “The acquisition of Cegertec is a sign of our continuing commitment to grow our expertise and diversify our operations in the Quebec market.  Our clients will now have access to a larger, comprehensive pool of resources, and a wide array of expertise and services under one banner, thanks to a combined team of 1,500 employees in Quebec.”

The acquisition is expected to close on the 25 May 2018.

Cegertec had previously explored partnership opportunities with other consultancies with its Saguenéenne engineering unit tied to WorleyParsons in a joint venture formed in 2012 to target mining, metals and oil and gas sectors. However, Cegertec bought out WorleyParsons’ stake in the JV last year returning decision making to its own management board.

Canadian National Brownfield Summit – June 13th 2018

Learning from the Past; Charting the Future
Attend Canada’s First Brownfield Summit, hosted by CBN

CBN is pleased to host the first-ever Brownfield Summit as this year’s edition of our annual conference. Join us in
Toronto June 13. The summit will feature:

  • Our popular Cross-country Check-up: a session on recent regulatory changes and an opportunity to learn about new initiatives from our panel of regulators
  • Legal Update: case law shapes our practice as brownfielders. This session will feature presentations on the most recent court cases affecting brownfields
  • Emerging Technology: focused presentations on the technological trends that will affect your brownfield practice today and in the future
  • NRTEE +15: the cornerstone of the Summit. Revisit the 2003 National Round Table on the Environment and the Economy (NRTEE) report as we find out what has worked, what still needs to be done, and what challenges are emerging. Then, join us in a discussion and determination of the brownfield agenda for the next few years

This will be a working event, so be prepared – bring the knowledge you’ve gained as a brownfield practitioner and your insights into brownfield redevelopment/reuse, roll up your sleeves and set the stage for the future of brownfields in Canada!

Register Today!

Ontario Transitioning Municipal Hazardous Waste Program

The Ontario Minister of the Environment and Climate Change recently issued direction to Stewardship Ontario (SO) to wind up the Municipal Hazardous or Special Waste Program by December 31, 2020. This wind up will allow the transition of materials collected under the program to individual producer responsibility under the Resource Recovery and Circular Economy Act, 2016.

The Minister’s letters can be found at:

Information related to the program wind up and future consultations will be posted to the Program Wind Up page when available. Until the wind up date, the Municipal Hazardous or Special Waste Program will continue to operate without disruption. This includes the operation of the Industry Stewardship Plans managed by the Automotive Materials Stewardship, the Product Care Association and SodaStream.

The Ontario Municipal Hazardous or Special Waste Program recycles or properly disposes of paint, antifreeze, batteries, fertilizers and other hazardous or special materials.  These wastes will continue to be managed in Ontario, but under a new program.  The winding down of the existing program is part of the provinces attempt to shift to a circular economy – a new waste management approach where waste is seen as a resource that can be recovered, reused and reintegrated into the production stream.

Ontario’s new waste management framework includes new legislation and a strategy to guide progress that will protect the environment, drive innovation, performance and competitiveness, and stimulate economic growth and development.