Canadian Brownfields Survey

The Canadian Brownfields Network (CBN), in conjunction with Ryerson University is conducting a survey on the perceptions of progress on recommendations that the National Roundtable on the Environment & Economy (NRTEE) released in 2003.

The CBN is most interested in knowing if persons involved in brownfield redevelopment feel if progress has been made on the NRTEE’s recommendations.

CBN and Ryerson have developed a survey for NRTEE +15 – have your say: . Survey results will form the basis of discussion at our 2018 Conference June 13. Please participate!

Possible benefits of participating in this study include that we aim to identify methods for increasing brownfields redevelopment activity in Canada, and encourage more involvement in brownfield redevelopment through comprehensive understanding of existing plans and policies.

Mining company working with environmentalists to clean up old mining sites

As reported by the CBC, Calgary-based mining company Margaux Resources has announced a plan to clean up old tailings sites by using new mining technologies to extract the remaining minerals.

Tailings have long been known to cause environmental damage including loss of animal habitats and contamination of soil, groundwater and waterways.

Margaux has partnered with the Salmo Watershed Sreamkeepers Society — a non-profit engaged in protecting and maintaining the Salmo River in southeastern B.C.— for the remediation project.

“What we have here is an industry leader that is sympathetic and realizes the situation that historic mining efforts have left,” said Gerry Nellestijn, the coordinator of the Salmo Watershed Streamkeepers Society.

Margaux president and CEO Tyler Rice says the benefits are two-fold as the company hopes to profit from the extractions made.

“When this material was mined historically, they didn’t have 100-percent recovery of the elements … with advancements of technology we feel there is an opportunity to potentially extract the materials that weren’t fully recovered,” Rice said.

The first site scheduled for extraction and remediation is the Jersey-Emerald mine, located just outside of Salmo B.C., and once a large producer of tungsten.

Aerial view of the Jersey-Emerald tungsten tailings pile

Margaux has submitted an application to both the Ministry of Environment and the Ministry of Energy and Mines to take a bulk sample from the Jersey-Emerald site to, “assess the viability of remediating the tailings site and the potential to economically produce a marketable mineral concentrate,” according to a news release issued earlier this month.

Rice admits the site will likely not be fully remediated for a couple of years.

Meanwhile, the Salmo Watershed Society says there are over 40 tailings sites in the area and they are working to assess them.

“It’s an approach to actually go out there and assess tailings, size them, try to figure out what the pollution pathways may be, what the constituents of that tailing might be and look for remediation efforts that would be easy to implement,” said Nellestijn.

And both partners seem to be happy with the current government’s responsiveness to their project.

“We have a strong government that may very well be interested in participating with this kind of movement — it’s been a long time coming,” Nellestijn said.

Chemical Biological Radiological Nuclear and Explosives (CBRNE) Detection Equipment Market Outlook

Chemical Biological Radiological Nuclear and Explosives (CBRNE) Detection Equipment Market: Global Industry Trends, Market Size, Competitive Analysis and Forecast – 2018 – 2026”, this study is recently published by Research Corridor covering global market size for Chemical Biological Radiological Nuclear and Explosives (CBRNE) Detection Equipment market for the key segments and further cross-regional segmentation of these segments for the period 2018 to 2026.

According to Research Corridor this study will provide in-depth analysis of segments on the basis of current trends, market dynamics and country level analysis of Chemical Biological Radiological Nuclear and Explosives (CBRNE) Detection Equipment industry. This report provides market estimates and forecast for the period 2016-2026, along with respective CAGRs for each segment and regional distribution for the period 2018-2026. In depth analysis of competitive landscape, porter’s five forces model, value chain analysis, and pricing strategies are also covered in the report scope.

Report Synopsis: Chemical Biological Radiological Nuclear and Explosives (CBRNE) Detection Equipment Market

This report provides an exhaustive market analysis of the Chemical Biological Radiological Nuclear and Explosives (CBRNE) Detection Equipment industry presented through sections such as

  1. Chemical Biological Radiological Nuclear and Explosives (CBRNE) Detection Equipment: Market Summary
  2. Key Developments in the Chemical Biological Radiological Nuclear and Explosives (CBRNE) Detection Equipment Industry
  3. Market Trends and Dynamics of Chemical Biological Radiological Nuclear and Explosives (CBRNE) Detection Equipment Industry
  4. Attractive Investment Proposition for Chemical Biological Radiological Nuclear and Explosives (CBRNE) Detection Equipment Market
  5. Competitive Landscape of Key Market Players in Chemical Biological Radiological Nuclear and Explosives (CBRNE) Detection Equipment Industry
  6. Current Market Scenario and Future Prospects of the Chemical Biological Radiological Nuclear and Explosives (CBRNE) Detection Equipment Market
  7. Mergers and Acquisitions in Chemical Biological Radiological Nuclear and Explosives (CBRNE) Detection Equipment Market
  8. Chemical Biological Radiological Nuclear and Explosives (CBRNE) Detection Equipment Market Revenue and Forecast, by Segment A Type, 2016 to 2026
  9. Chemical Biological Radiological Nuclear and Explosives (CBRNE) Detection Equipment Market Revenue and Forecast, by Segment B Type, 2016 to 2026
  10. Chemical Biological Radiological Nuclear and Explosives (CBRNE) Detection Equipment Market Revenue and Forecast, by Segment C Type, 2016 to 2026
  11. Chemical Biological Radiological Nuclear and Explosives (CBRNE) Detection Equipment Market Revenue and Forecast, by Segment D, 2016 to 2026
  12. Chemical Biological Radiological Nuclear and Explosives (CBRNE) Detection Equipment Market Revenue and Forecast, by Geography, 2016 to 2026

Browse for The Full Report:

Key Takeaways:

  1. Market size and forecast of the Chemical Biological Radiological Nuclear and Explosives (CBRNE) Detection Equipment market for the period from 2016 to 2026
  2. Compounded annual growth rate (CAGR%) for each segment in several regional markets by year 2026
  3. Market share analysis combined with competitive landscape of key players
  4. Profiles of key market players covering overall business operations, geographic presence, product portfolio, financial status and news coverage

Innovative Technology to streamlines brownfield industry projects

As reported by Martin Menachery in Arabian Oil and Gas, Over 95% of projects in the process industry in the Middle East (and comparable percentages around the world) are retrofits or expansions of existing plants that seek to increase capacity, comply with regulations, or introduce new technology to improve performance.

Moreover, often the building of a new plant is done on the brownfield site of an existing facility. For all these projects, capturing and modelling the existing context is critical to decision making and both conceptual and detailed engineering design. 3-D Software reality modelling technology is increasingly being leveraged to support these critical workflows.

In this year’s submissions for the ‘Be Inspired Awards’, there are five excellent examples using reality modelling technology in the process industry, demonstrating how this technology has now become an essential part of any brownfield or greenfield plant design project.

UCB, a global biopharmaceutical company, is using reality modelling for its iconic manufacturing plant in Belgium (which was established in 1928) to assess options and communicate ideas to help this complex and established site become carbon neutral by the year 2030.

ContextCapture was used to create an engineering-ready 3D model of the entire complex, including all the buildings, production facilities, roads, and parking areas, using both drone and terrestrial photography.

This context enabled the engineering team to quickly produce a 3D model to convey ideas and determine options. Point-cloud data from laser scans was then added to the model to enable accurate quantities to be calculated and precise measurements to be given to contractors for the priority work packages.

ABS Steel needed to modernise the fume extraction system for its large steel complex in Udine, Italy, to meet new regulations. It did not have a survey of the entire site since the complex was the result of a merger of two plants in 1988. ABS Steel awarded the contract to BM Engineering to survey the site.

It used laser scanning for inside the plant and photography for outside the plant, creating a combined engineering-ready model in MicroStation using ContextCapture and Bentley Pointools, which was read into AECOsim Building Designer and used to design the new fume extraction system. The model was then used to test the structural integrity of the aging parts of the factory.

By using a drone to capture photos of the roofs of the industrial buildings, and using ContextCapture to accurately create the 3D model, the project avoided the need to construct at least 70,000 temporary structures (guardrails, walkways, ladders, PPE, etc.) to conduct the survey work.

Flightline Geographics (FlightlineGeo) solved a problem for an owner of an ethanol plant in Kansas, United States, plant expansion of which was impeded by a lack of a drainage plan that would satisfy the local municipality. Traditional alternative methods, such as ground surveying and either ground or aerial LiDAR, were eliminated as possible solutions due to the short time frame and limited project budget involved.

A drone was able to survey this 200-acre ethanol plant site in one hour. (Image courtesy: FlightlineGeo)

It was decided to use a drone (UAV) and, once survey ground control was placed, the UAV capture of the 200-acre site was completed in a single one-hour flight. The team used ContextCapture to produce the 3D model that engineers needed to quickly calculate the results for the drainage and construction study, which was presented to municipal authorities a few days later.

Moreover, the team leveraged the same work to create a 3MX reality mesh that could then be used for visualisation within the Acute 3D viewer. It took just one week to conceive, capture, process, and deliver the project, and gain approval.

Technical Solutions International (RBI) is a world-class engineering inspection company headquartered in Durban, South Africa. RBI has deployed a solution that combines the use of unmanned autonomous vehicles (UAVs or drones), 3D reality modelling software (ContextCapture), a geographical information system (Bentley MAP), and engineering documentation management (ProjectWise) to manage the entire inspection process.

Its clients include petrochemical, pulp and paper, power generation, and telecommunications firms. The new process enables RBI to deliver more competitive services to its clients that speed survey time considerably and increase the value and visibility of its inspection survey data.

“UCB SA is driving a ‘smart factories’ initiative, leveraging Industry 4.0 and Bentley technology. Our objective is to reorganise production so that we are more adaptable and effective in the allocation of resources. We store our engineering data in ProjectWise for better collaboration among colleagues,” said Joseph Ciarmoli, Head of CAD engineering, UCB SA.

“Using ContextCapture for 3D modelling of our site provides geo-referencing and allocates geographical coordinates to our data. Analysing the 3D model together with the orthophoto drawings provides the official record of our land registry data, waterways, and buildings,” added Ciarmoli.

“We can also bring this 3D model into AECOsim Building Designer to support any building design changes. For proposed modifications to our production facilities, we use OpenPlant Modeler and OpenPlant Isometrics to provide precise 3D data for contractors and to automate the detection of clashes between pipes, structures, and equipment,” observed Ciarmoli.

“The interoperability of Bentley products has made it possible to optimise and significantly reduce the survey and reality modelling time, while also allowing a BIM model to be created that can easily be used by all stakeholders (structural and plant designers), who have decidedly and significantly improved the efficiency of their integrated design, allowing the implementation of the first revamping phase to be reached just three months after delivery of the BIM model,” said Marco Barberini of BM Engineering.

“Reality modelling using ContextCapture from Bentley enabled FlightlineGeo to process a large amount of data into information for the client in near real time. The project was completed ahead of time and under budget, allowing the company to acquire its expansion permit and move on with production of renewable energy,” commented Devon Humphrey, CEO, FlightlineGeo.

“Bentley’s range of products and integration between their products and our automated UAV systems gives us and our clients an added advantage against an ever-improving competitive market. The future we live in today,” said Stanley du Toit, technical and solution director, RBI Technical Solutions International.

3D design and conceptual model of the city of Coatesville’s “The Flats” brownfield redevelopment, a rugged, 30-acre former steel-mill site located 40 miles west of Philadelphia.

CHAR Technologies Acquires The ALTECH Group

The ALTECH Group of companies (“Altech”) and CHAR Technologies Ltd. (“CHAR”) are now working together!  CHAR Technologies Ltd. (TSXV:YES) has acquired The ALTECH Group in an effort to expand the offering of cleantech environmental technologies, including SulfaCHAR and CleanFyre.  The ALTECH Group provides environmental engineering solutions to industry in North America in the areas of air pollution control, industrial energy efficiency, and process water recycling.  The new combined entity provides cleantech solutions to industrial environmental engineering challenges.

CHAR currently produces SulfaCHAR®, a bio organic product, similar to activated carbon, competing on cost and performance with other air pollution control solutions.  SulfaCHAR is specially designed to remove hydrogen sulfide from renewable natural gas (ie. biogas from anaerobic digesters and landfill gas, as well as other contaminants from industrial air emissions).  CleanFyre® is an exciting new bio-coal product that is a cost effective substitute with similar energy potential to coal as a fossil fuel.  The major advantage of bio-coal is that it is Greenhouse Gas (GHG) neutral.  Companies replacing coal with CleanFyre will be eligible to earn GHG Credits in the fight for Climate Change.  This is an important product advancement in the fight to significantly reduce Greenhouse Gases.


The merged entity has over 30 years of experience throughout North America in delivering full-service engineering and turnkey technology installations to corporations interested in sustainable and cost effective solutions.  As the holder of a number of patents, ALTECH and CHAR have unique, cost effective solutions for effluent air and water problems.  The combined entity has the ability to design, fabricate, and install leading edge cleantech solutions, solving complex environmental problems in very cost effective ways.  As a group that is constantly innovating, this partnership of cleantech firms continues to develop and apply world class solutions that make sense from a cost savings point-of-view.






Mr. Alex Keen:

Mr. Andrew White:


Successful Demonstration of Enhanced Soil Vapour Extraction

Researchers at Integrated Science & Technologies Inc. recently presented the findings from a field demonstration project that showed that enhanced soil vapour extraction significantly reduced the concentration of 1,4-Dioxane in soil.

1,4-Dioxane is often called simple dioxane because the other dioxane isomers (1,2- and 1,3-) are rarely encountered.  1,4-Dioxane is a synthetic industrial chemical that is completely miscible in water.  It is used as a solvent for a variety of applications.  1,4-Dioxane is a likely contaminant at many sites contaminated with certain chlorinated solvents (particularly 1,1,1-trichloroethane [TCA]) because of its widespread use as a stabilizer for chlorinated solvents

With respect to remediation, some 1,4-dioxane can be removed from pore water found in the vadose zone (unsaturated zone) in the subsurface by conventional soil vapor extraction (SVE), remediation is typically inefficient.  SVE extracts vapors from the soil above the water table by applying a vacuum to pull the vapors out.

SVE is inefficient at removing 1,4-dioxane from pore water in the subsurface vadose zone.  1,4-dioxane has a low Henry’s Law constant at ambient temperature.  This means that there is a low concentration of dissolved 1,4-dioxane gas proportional to its partial pressure in the gas phase.

To enhance the extraction for 1,4-dioxane in the subsurface, the researchers used heated air injection and more focused SVE extraction (XSVE).  The pilot teste was conducted at the former McClellan Air Force Base located in the North Highlands area of Sacramento County, 7 miles (11 km) northeast of Sacramento, California.

Soil Vapor Extraction unit at former McClellan Air Force Base, Calif. (U.S. Air Force Photo by Scott Johnston)

The pilot test consisted for four peripheral heated air injection wells of the XSVE system surrounded a 6.1 m x 6.1 m x 9.1 m deep treatment zone with a central vapor extraction well.

Soil temperature measurements were taken during the pilot test.  Soil temperatures reached as high as ~90°C near the injection wells after 14 months of operation and flushing of the treatment zone with ~20,000 pore volumes of injected air.  Results post treatment showed dioxane reductions of ~94% and ~45% decrease in soil moisture.  See additional information in slides at .

AGAT Labs appoints New President and Chief Operating Officer

AGAT Labs recently announced the appointment of Marissa Reckmann to the position of President and Chief Operating Officer at AGAT Laboratories. In her new role, Marissa will be focused on ensuring the preservation of AGAT’s culture and values, including the company philosophies, mission statement and loyalty to all staff and clients.

Marissa Reckmann, B.Sc. (Honours), P.Chem.

Marissa graduated from Lakehead University with a B.Sc. (Honours) degree in Chemistry. Marissa joined AGAT in 2006 and quickly gained experience within each of the company’s geographic and diversified operating divisions. Her positions within AGAT took on new and increasing responsibilities as AGAT transitioned from a local laboratory to the most scientifically diversified laboratory in Canada. During her tenure at AGAT, Marissa gained experience in each of AGAT’s operating divisions and as the company expanded nationally Marissa’s leadership was instrumental in helping AGAT gain a solid footprint for our services from coast to coast in 43 locations. In her varied roles, Marissa was responsible for ensuring overall national coordination of AGAT’s goals and objectives within each of the operating units across Canada. Marissa has proven herself to be a strongly dedicated leader, holding the best interests of her clients and colleagues, while serving to enhance communications and advance scientific services, quality and best business practices.

Marissa is currently President of the Canadian Land Reclamation Association – Alberta Chapter and a member of the Board of Directors of the National Canadian Land Reclamation Association.

U.S. EPA Releases Annual Enforcement Statistics

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) recently released its annual environmental enforcement report.  In its report, which covers prosecutions for the 2016-2017 fiscal year (ending September 30th 2017), the U.S. EPA states that nearly $5 billion (U.S.) had been levied out in criminal fines and civil penalties.  It also stated that enforcement actions have also led to the commitment by companies to clean-up contaminated sites across the U.S.

In contrast, Canada does not issue an annual enforcement report.  However, the total sum of announced penalties by the Canadian federal government totaled approximately $15 million in 2017.

The bulk of the monetary fines levied in the U.S. was from the settlement with Volkswagen.  The company agreed to pay $1.45 billion (U.S.) in civil penalties because of its use of illegal software to foil emissions testing.

The U.S. EPA was alerted by an environmental activist group, The International Council on Clean Transportation in 2013 that on-road emission tests of Volkswagen vehicles were dramatically different than off-road test in garages.  The finding led U.S. EPA officials to discover that Volkswagen had installed software in vehicles to shut off the emissions control system during driving and only turned it on during off-road testing.

A worker tests a red 2016 Volkswagen AG Golf TDI emissions certification vehicle on Sept. 22, 2015. (Photo Credit: Patrick T. Fallon/Bloomberg News)

The $1.45 billion fine levied against Volkswagen still dwarfs the $6 billion penalty paid by BP for the 2010 oil spill from Horizon One oil rig in the Gulf of Mexico.

In contrast, the largest fine ever meted out in Canada was $3.5 million (Cdn.) to Prairie Mines & Royalty ULC in 2017 wastewater spill at a mine.

Included in the report, was the note of the legal commitment made by companies clean-up sites they had contaminated.  The estimated cost of that clean-ups is $1.2 billion (U.S.).

With respect to jail time for environmental criminals, the U.S. EPA prosecuted individuals and U.S. courts meted out a total of 150 years in jail for persons found guilty of environmental offences.  In contrast, the total jail time Canadian courts meted out for environmental offenders was less than one year.

Critics of the U.S. EPA note that the high level of enforcement actions may not continue.  Critics point to an analysis by the New York Times in late 2017 that concluded that the U.S. EPA under its latest head, Scott Pruitt, has initiated about one-third fewer civil enforcement cases than the number under the previous U.S. EPA director.

Avoiding Common Phase Two ESA Errors – Part 2

By: Bill Leedham, P.Geo, QP, CESA.

Last month I discussed some common mistakes I have encountered in reviewing Phase Two Environmental Site Assessment reports, specifically in the initial planning stage, now it’s time to turn our attention to recognizing and reducing errors during the Phase Two ESA field work.

Sometimes, deficiencies that occur in the planning stages of a Phase Two ESA transfer into errors in field procedures.  This can be caused by poor communication between the project manager and field staff (i.e. the PM neglects to inform field personnel of specific project requirements, and/or field staff forget to include important sampling media or potential contaminants of concern).  Full, two-way communication is vital to successful completion of any Phase Two ESA. It’s not enough for senior staff to just assume that less experienced team members understand all the complexities of the sampling plan; nor is it acceptable for a project manager to fail to provide adequate guidance and answers to questions from the field.  I have always thought it was important for junior staff to ‘know what they don’t know’ and encouraged them to ask questions at any time.  When project managers are ‘too busy’ to answer questions and simply tell their staff to ‘figure it out themselves’ everyone loses.

Photo Credit: All Phase Environmental

Despite good intentions and full communication, deficiencies can still occur.  Some are the result of inexperience compounded by poor judgement; some are due to budget limitations or staffing shortfalls; and some are caused through poor sampling protocols.  Some of the more common field sampling errors can include: failure to sample all relevant media at a Site (e.g. no sediment or surface water sampling is undertaken despite the presence of a potentially impacted water body); failure to consider all potential contaminants of concern (e.g. sampling only for petroleum hydrocarbons at a fuel storage site and not volatile parameters like BTEX); failure to sample in locations where contaminants are most likely to occur or be detected (e.g. sampling only surficial or near surface soils, and not at the invert of a buried fuel tank or oil interceptor, or failure to sample groundwater in a potable groundwater situation); and lack of field or lab filtering of groundwater samples for metals analysis (failure to remove sediment prior to sample preservation can skew the results for metals analysis).

Inadequate sampling and decontamination procedures can also bias lab results, leading to inaccurate or faulty conclusions.  When samples are disturbed (such as grab samples of soil collected directly from a drill augur that has travelled through an impacted zone) or collected improperly (e.g. compositing soil samples for analysis of volatile components); the test results can be biased and may not be representative of actual site conditions.  Similarly, failure to properly clean drilling and sampling equipment can result in apparent impacts that are actually the result of cross contamination between sampling points. Consider using dedicated or disposable sampling equipment to reduce this potential. A suitable quality control program should also be implemented, including sufficient duplicate samples, trip blanks, etc. for QA/QC purposes, and inclusion of equipment rinsate blanks to confirm adequate decontamination.

These are only a few of the more common field sampling errors I have come across. In an upcoming article I will discuss other practical methods to reduce errors in Phase Two data interpretation and reporting.

About the Author

Bill Leedham is the Head Instructor and Course Developer for the Associated Environmental Site Assessors of Canada (AESAC); and the founder and President of Down 2 Earth Environmental Services Inc. You can contact Bill at


This article first appeared in AESAC newsletter.

BC Seeks Feedback on Second Phase of the Spill Response Regime


Bennett Jones LLP

David Bursey, Radha Curpen, and Sharon Singh

[co-author: Charlotte Teal, Articling Student]

Phase-2 to BC’s Spill Response Regime

The British Columbia government is moving forward with the second phase of spill regulations, announcing further stakeholder engagement on important elements, such as spill response in sensitive areas and geographic response plans. The government will also establish an independent scientific advisory panel to recommend whether, and how, heavy oils (such as bitumen) can be safely transported and cleaned up. While the advisory panel is proceeding, the government is proposing regulatory restrictions on the increase of diluted bitumen (dilbit) transportation.

The second phase engagement process follows the first phase of regulatory overhaul introduced in October 2017, when the Province established higher standards for spill preparedness, response and recovery.

Photo Credit: Jonathan Hayward/Canadian Press

Feedback and Engagement

The Province is planning an intentions paper for the end of February 2018 that will outline the government’s proposed regulations and will be available for public comment.

In particular, the Province will seek feedback on:

  1. response times, to ensure timely responses to spills;
  2. geographic response plans, to ensure that resources are available to support an immediate response that account for the unique characteristics of sensitive areas;
  3. compensation for loss of public and cultural use of land, resources or public amenities in the case of spills;
  4. maximizing application of regulations to marine spills; and
  5. restrictions on the increase of dilbit transportation until the behaviour of spilled bitumen can be better understood and there is certainty regarding the ability to adequately mitigate spills.

What this means for industry

This second phase was planned follow up to the October 2017 regulations. Many of the proposed regulatory changes have been part of ongoing stakeholder discussions for the past few years. However, the prospect of permanent restrictions or a ban on the increased transportation of dilbit off the coast of B.C. and the prospect of further regulatory recommendations from the independent scientific advisory panel creates uncertainty for Canada’s oil sector.

The government’s emphasis on environmental concerns related to bitumen and its recent initiatives to restrict oil exports to allow time for more study of marine impacts will further fuel the national discourse on how to export Canada’s oil to international markets from the Pacific Coast.


This article was first published on the Bennett Jones LLP website.

About the Authors