Transport Canada publishes quick reference guide for first responders

As part of the Government of Canada’s ongoing commitment to providing first responders and emergency planners with the tools and resources they need to respond to a dangerous goods emergency, Transport Canada convened a meeting of the Steering Committee on First Responder Training today.

The meeting brought together stakeholders and government representatives to help steer the development of a national training curriculum for personnel who respond to railway incidents involving the transportation of dangerous goods.

At the meeting, Transport Canada announced the publication of a quick reference guide, You’re Not Alone!, which is designed to help first responders at the scene of an incident involving flammable liquids.  The guide outlines important safety measures and groups them into five steps as part of emergency planning.

The guide was added to Safety Awareness Kits published by Transport Canada in 2017 and is aimed at first responders and communities.

Transport Canada published these kits and the quick reference guide to raise community awareness of existing available resources on dangerous goods.

The Honourable Marc Garneau, Minister of Transport, in a statement said: “Communities and first responders need to know that if a dangerous goods incident occurs, they’re not alone, and there are resources available to help. The safe transportation of dangerous goods by rail remains one of my top priorities.  We all share a common goal of making sure everyone is prepared for a dangerous goods emergency and the ‘You’re Not Alone!’ quick reference guide is an important piece of that preparation.”

The reference guide can be accessed here.

Evolution of Emergency Management

by Lee Spencer, Spencer Emergency Management Consulting

You would have to be living under a rock to have not heard the resounding thud of the Ontario Auditor General’s report on the state of emergency management in Canada’s most populated province hitting the desks of the emergency management community in Canada (report) . I for one was not shocked by the findings and believe most jurisdictions in Canada would see similar criticism if subject to an OAG review.

For generations, provincial level emergency management has been an after thought.  Historically staffed by second career fire/police/military retirees who were expected to be seen and not heard.  These legacy EMOs were counted on to create order in the otherwise chaotic response phase of large scale disaster and otherwise quickly to be ignored again once the situation was restored and recovery programs began to hand out government grants.

After 9/11 it was clear to elected officials that the public had an expectation of the EMO cavalry galloping in to defeat any hazard, risk or terrorist.  But the costs and the growth that would be needed to meet that expectation could not compete with the schools, hospitals, roads and bridges built to ensure tangible things could be pointed to when an election rolled around.  After all the last thing most governments want claim at election time is they added more civil servants.

So in this era of increased public expectation, EMOs were given very little new resources to modernize and adapt to the new reality.  Provincial EMOs were left to the task of preparedness and response in the modern context with resources more suited to the National Survival primordial ooze from which provincial EMOs emerged.

I am hopeful that the public shaming of our most densely populated economic engine, will lead to a national discussion of the investment required to truly meet the realities and expectations of modern emergency management.There are already several emerging national strategies that will aid in this effort, Canada’s emerging Broadband Public Safety Network and the expanding National Public Alerting Systems are modern capabilities that will go a long way to enhance capacity at even the most modest EMO.

We are also starting to see an expansion in post secondary degrees and diplomas which will lead to firmly establishing emergency management as a profession in Canada.  These emerging professionals will eventually take over the leadership roles from folks like me (second career), bringing with them the education and experience to combine the historical EMOs with modern thinking.

I know my former colleagues in the EMO’s across Canada are shifting uncomfortably at there desks at the moment waiting for their own leaders to ask how they compare to Ontario.  It would seem to me that if your not uncomfortable you just don’t get it.

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About the Author

 Lee Spencer is founder and President of Spencer Emergency Management Consulting.  The company is focused on the strategic integration of emergency management concepts towards an outcome of resilience within a community, business or government.

 

This article was first published Spencer Emergency Management Consulting e-blog site.

Canada-based GFL Acquires Accuworx Inc.

GFL Environmental Inc. (“GFL”) recently announced the closing of the acquisition of the Canadian operations of Accuworx Inc. including Sure Horizon Environmental Inc., based in Brampton, Ontario.  Since its founding in 1989 by Jason Rosset, Accuworx has grown to be a leading provider of “cradle to cradle” environmental solutions for a broad base of liquid waste customers throughout Ontario.  Accuworx’s services include industrial cleaning, emergency response, soil and groundwater remediation and liquid waste management which will complement and extend the service offerings of GFL’s existing liquid waste business in Ontario.  Jason Rosset will remain with GFL working to further develop the customer base of our combined operations.

Patrick Dovigi, GFL’s Founder and CEO said: “Started by its founder, Jason Rosset, the key to Accuworx’s success has been its core entrepreneurial values: creating solutions that allow it to be a single source provider for all of its customers’ service needs.  This aligns with GFL’s core values and strategy. Accuworx and Sure Horizon also have a committed, passionate employee base that bring the same level of commitment to service excellence for our customers as GFL’s employees.  We are confident that this common commitment will make the integration of our service offerings seamless and allow us to continue to grow and serve our customers.  We are excited to have Jason Rosset and employees of Accuworx in Canada join the GFL team.”

Jason Rosset, Founder of Accuworx said: “Accuworx has traveled a long way as an independent, trail-blazing company, and I am confident that this strategic fit with GFL represents an ideal opportunity for Accuworx and our employees to accelerate to the next chapter of growth while maintaining the entrepreneurial culture in which we have thrived.”

GFL, headquartered in Toronto, ON, is a diversified environmental services company providing  solid waste, infrastructure & soil remediation, and liquid waste management services through its platform of facilities across Canada and in Southeastern Michigan.  GFL has a workforce of more than 5,000 employees.

FirstOnSite Restoration opens new Quebec branch

FirstOnSite Restoration, Canada’s leading independent disaster restoration services provider, has bolstered its Quebec offering with the opening of a new branch in Ste-Agathe, QC.  The branch will serve the restoration, remediation and reconstruction needs of both existing and new customers in the Laurentians region (including Mont Tremblant, Ste-Agathe and Saint-Sauveur) and complement service provided by the current branches in Montréal and Québec City.

This new branch is led by Senior Project Manager and Acting Branch Manager, Olivier Bertrand. Olivier, who resides in the Laurentians, originally joined FirstOnSite in 2010, and has had a successful history of entrepreneurship, business management and restoration industry expertise. He has more than 10-years experience in disaster recovery and restoration, and has worked on multimillion-dollar commercial restoration and reconstruction projects as well as condominiums and residential rebuilds. Olivier has also owned and operated his own construction firm, where he specialized in new build construction.

“Olivier’s experience in leadership, management and restoration uniquely qualifies him to launch and manage this new FirstOnSite location,” said Barry J. Ross, Executive Vice President, FirstOnSite Restoration.

Supporting Olivier is Project Manager, Eric Archambault, a 30-year veteran of the restoration industry, and an expert in loss evaluation and restoration of major residential and commercial properties. Eric is also a resident of the Laurentians.

The new branch will be reinforced by FirstOnSite’s flagship Montréal/Dorval branch – the largest full service commercial and residential restoration provider in the province, and is the next step of the company’s expansion plans in Quebec.

“The Ste-Agathe branch brings a dedicated and full-time staff to the region and reinforces our commitment to providing superior customer service,” said Ross. “It will help FirstOnSite extend the coverage we offer customers through our existing locations.”

About FirstOnSite Restoration

FirstOnSite Restoration Limited is an independent Canadian disaster restoration services provider, providing remediation, restoration and reconstruction services nationwide, and for the U.S. large loss and commercial market. With approximately 1,000 employees, more than 35 locations, 24/7 emergency service and a commitment to customer service, FirstOnSite  serves the residential, commercial and industrial sectors.

In May 2016, FirstOnSite joined forces with U.S.-based Interstate Restoration, expanding its resource base, and extending its customer service offering and collectively becoming the second largest restoration service provider in North America.

Market Study on U.S. Volatile Organic Compound Detector Market

Questale, a firm specializing in market research, recently published an industry research that focuses on United States Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) Monitor market and delivers in-depth market analysis and future prospects of United States Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) Monitor market.  The study covers significant data which makes the research document a handy resource for managers, analysts, industry experts and other key people get ready-to-access and self-analyzed study along with graphs and tables to help understand market trends, drivers and United States Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) Monitor market challenges. The study is segmented by Application/ end users Environmental site surveying, Industrial Hygiene, HazMat/Homeland Security , products type PID, Metal-oxide Semiconductor, On the basis on the end users/applications, this report focuses on the status and outlook for major applications/end users, sales volume, market share and growth rate for each application, including and various important geographies.

Remote Environmental Monitoring Research

The research covers the current market size of the United States Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) Monitor market and its growth rates based on 5 year history data along with company profile of key players/manufacturers. The in-depth information by segments of United States Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) Monitor market helps monitor future profitability & to make critical decisions for growth. The information on trends and developments, focuses on markets and materials, capacities, technologies, CAPEX cycle and the changing structure of the United States Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) Monitor Market.

The study provides company profiling, product picture and specifications, sales, market share and contact information of key manufacturers of United States Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) Monitor Market, some of them listed here are REA Systems , Ion Science , Thermo Fisher . The United States Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) Monitor market is growing at a very rapid pace and with rise in technological innovation, competition and M&A activities in the industry many local and regional vendors are offering specific application products for varied end-users. The new manufacturer entrants in the United States Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) Monitor market are finding it hard to compete with the international vendors based on quality, reliability, and innovations in technology.

United States Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) Monitor (Thousands Units) and Revenue (Million USD) Market Split by Product Type such as PID, Metal-oxide Semiconductor, On the basis on the end users/applications, this report focuses on the status and outlook for major applications/end users, sales volume, market share and growth rate for each application, including . Further the research study is segmented by Application such as Environmental site surveying, Industrial Hygiene, HazMat/Homeland Security with historical and projected market share and compounded annual growth rate.

 

Geographically, this United States Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) Monitor market research report is segmented into several key Regions, with production, consumption, revenue (million USD), and market share and growth rate of Joint Mixture in these regions, from 2012 to 2022 (forecast), covering ,, etc and its Share (%) and CAGR for the forecasted period 2017 to 2022.

Read Detailed Index of full Research Study at @ https://questale.com/report/united-states-volatile-organic-compound-voc-monitor-market-report-2018/178527.

Changes to the International Maritime Dangerous Goods (IMDG) Code

The International Maritime Dangerous Goods (IMDG) Code or International Maritime Dangerous Goods Code is accepted as an international guideline to the safe transportation or shipment of dangerous goods or hazardous materials by water on vessel.  A Corrigenda was published earlier this month that makes some changes to the 38-16 version. Note that this version becomes mandatory for use starting January 1st, 2018.

A summary of the key changes is as follows:

  1. The words “marking” and “markings” have all been replaced with “mark” or “marks” through the entire code.
  2. The new Class 9 Hazard Label for Lithium Batteries also received some clarification in Chapter 5.2.2.2.1.3 in that the number of vertical stripes must be 7 at the top and the bottom must have the symbol and the number 9. Words describing the hazards are not permitted on this label.
  3. Special Provision 384 that speaks to the new Class 9 Hazard Label was revised to clarify that there is no placard equivalent to this new label. If needed, the normal Class 9 placard should be used.

The International Maritime Dangerous Goods (IMDG) Code was adopted in 1965 as per the SOLAS (Safety for Life at Sea) Convention of 1960. The IMDG Code was formed to prevent all types of pollutions at sea.

The code also ensures that the goods transported through marine transport are packaged in such a way that they can be safely transported. The dangerous goods code is a uniform code. This means that the code is applicable for all cargo-carrying ships around the world.

The dangerous goods code has been created as per the recommendations of the United Nations’ panel of expert on transport of dangerous goods along with the IMO (International Maritime Organisation). This recommendation by the UN was presented as a report in the year 1956 after which the IMDG Code was started to be drafted in the year 1961.

 

Market Report on the Emergency Spill Response Industry

360 Market Updates recently issued an Emergency Spill Response Market Research Report that highlights key dynamics of North America Emergency Spill Response Market sector.  The Research Report passes on an initial survey of the emergency spill response market including its definition, applications and innovation.  Additionally, the report explores the major market players in detail.  The Research Report provides a detailed overview and discussion the status of the players involved in emergency spill response.  It is also a valuable source of information on trends in the industry including projected growth.

Key questions answered in the Emergency Spill Response Market report include the following:

  • What will the market growth rate of Emergency Spill Response market in 2022?
  • What are the key factors driving the North America Emergency Spill Response market?
  • What are sales, revenue, and price analysis of top manufacturers of Emergency Spill Response market?
  • Who are the distributors, traders and dealers of Emergency Spill Response market?
  • Who are the key vendors in Geographical market space?
  • What are the Emergency Spill Response market opportunities and threats faced by the vendors in the North America Emergency Spill Response market?
  • What are sales, revenue, and price analysis by types, application and regions of Emergency Spill Response market?
  • What are the market opportunities and risks?

There are 15 Chapters to deeply display the North America Emergency Spill Response market.

Chapter 1, to describe Emergency Spill Response Introduction, product type and application, market overview, market analysis by countries, market opportunities, market risk, market driving force;

Chapter 2, to analyze the manufacturers of Emergency Spill Response, with profile, main business, news, sales, price, revenue and market share in 2016 and 2017;

Chapter 3, to display the competitive situation among the top manufacturers, with profile, main business, news, sales, price, revenue and market share in 2016 and 2017;

Chapter 4, to show the North America market by countries, covering United States, Canada and Mexico, with sales, revenue and market share of Emergency Spill Response, for each country, from 2012 to 2017;

Chapter 5 and 6, to show the market by type and application, with sales, price, revenue, market share and growth rate by type, application, from 2012 to 2017;

Chapter 7, 8 and 9, to analyze the segment market in United States, Canada and Mexico, by manufacturers, type and application, with sales, price, revenue and market share by manufacturers, types and applications;

Chapter 10, Emergency Spill Response market forecast, by countries, type and application, with sales, price and revenue, from 2017 to 2022;

Chapter 11, to analyze the manufacturing cost, key raw materials and manufacturing process etc.

Chapter 12, to analyze the industrial chain, sourcing strategy and downstream end users (buyers);

Chapter 13, to describe sales channel, distributors, traders, dealers etc.

Chapter 14 and 15, to describe Emergency Spill Response Research Findings and Conclusion, Appendix, methodology and data source

According to an earlier study by Markets and Markets research firm, the emergency spill response market is estimated to be worth USD 33.68 Billion by 2022.   Markets and Markets research firm hold the view that the emergency spill response market is driven by the increasing international trade and transportation and initiatives taken by government agencies of various countries globally to protect the environment from the adverse effects of pollution by enacting various environmental protection and restoration policies and legislations. In the future, government initiatives to strengthen the response to oil spills on the sea would provide opportunities to the players operating in this market.

HAZ-MATTERS Emergency Management Inc. aligns with STRATEGIC ALLIANCE, HAZTECH GROUP

HAZ-MATTERS Emergency Management Inc. recently announced a newly established strategic alliance with Haztech Group in Saskatchewan for the ongoing provision of specialty hazardous materials training.

Haztech is a vertically integrated, full-service occupational focused Medical, Health, Safety, Security, and Training service provider, with the prime focus being Safety and Service Delivery.  The company claims to have established themselves as “the new standard,” in the health and safety fields by providing best-practice services throughout western Canada.

 

Haztech offers a suite of services to an array of industrial, construction, oilfield and mining clients, including the public sector.  The company directs industry to adopt higher compliance standards in health, safety and security through the comprehensive support and reinforcement.

B.C. First Nation says it has created world-class oil spill response plan

As reported by CTV News, A British Columbia First Nation has released a plan it says will give it a leading role in oil spill prevention and response on the province’s central coast.

A report from the Heiltsuk Nation calls for the creation of an Indigenous Marine Response Centre capable of responding within five hours along a 350 kilometre stretch of the coast.

The centre proposal follows what the report calls the “inadequate, slow and unsafe” response to the October 2016 grounding of the tug the Nathan E. Stewart that spilled about 110,000 litres of diesel and other contaminants.

Bella Bella Oil Spill (Photo Credit: HEILTSUK FIRST NATION)

Heiltsuk Chief Councillor Marilyn Slett says during that disaster her people saw what senior governments had described as world-class spill response and she says the Heiltsuk promised themselves that this would never happen in their territory again.

The report says the proposed centre, on Denny Island across from Bella Bella, and satellite operations dotted along the central coast, would need a total investment of $111.5 million to be operational by next summer.

Unlike current response programs which the report says are limited specifically to spills, the new centre would answer all marine calls with the potential for oil contamination, including groundings, fires, bottom contacts and capsizings.

“(The centre’s) effectiveness hinges on a fleet of fast response vessels capable of oil clean up and containment, and a tug and barge system providing storage and additional oil spill clean-up capabilities,” the report says.

The barge would also be equipped with enough safety gear, provisions and living space to allow a response team to remain on site for up to three weeks without outside support.

The marine response centre would have annual operating costs of $6.8 million, covering a full-time staff and crew of 37.

“From Ahousaht with the Leviathan II to Gitga’at with the Queen of the North to Heiltsuk with the Nathan E. Stewart, Indigenous communities have shown that we are and will continue to be the first responders to marine incidents in our waters,” says the report, signed by Slett and hereditary Chief Harvey Humchitt.

Indigenous rescuers were first on the scene when six people died after the whale-watching vessel the Leviathan II capsized north of Tofino in 2015. Two people were killed when the Queen of the North hit an island and sank in 2006 west of Hartley Bay and First Nations helped in the rescue.

“The time has come to meaningfully develop our capacity to properly address emergencies in our territories as they arise,” the report says.

Opportunities for Tank Hauler and Hazmat Truck Drivers

According to a recent article in The Job Network, there is a high demand in the United States for drivers for tanker trucks and hazmat vehicles. Whether self employed or work for a company, find the right truck insurance quote, as it is essential to help cover you and your vehicle in case of any emergency and potentially save you money. According to the article the highest-paying trucking jobs in the U.S. Market are as follows:

  1. Tanker Hauler

Tanker trucks are those big machines that haul liquid such as water or gasoline. You’ll need to get your commercial driver’s license (CDL) endorsed to do this particular job, which can be both difficult and dangerous since liquid cargo can be unstable. However, it is one of the highest paying trucking jobs—fuel tanker drivers earn as much as $70,000 per year. Consider the extra training and certification as an investment in your career and also a way to decrease the chances of something being rear-ended by a semi-truck!

  1. Hazmat Diver

Like tanker hauling, hauling hazardous materials is another way to up your game. Get your CDL endorsed for this skill and you can widely increase the number of tanker hauls you’re eligible to do. Endorsing your CDL means you have access to a specialized (and lucrative) category of jobs. Hazmat drivers are also guaranteed a minimum of $1,000 a week after a year of experience according to RoadMaster.com.

  1. Oversized Load Hauler

You need a special license and special training to haul extra-large loads such as heavy machinery, but, again, driving wide or oversized loads will mean you’ll be paid more. According to WideLoadShipping.com, oversized load truckers earn between $53,125 and $90,000 on average. You might even earn six figures if you’re willing to sacrifice some home time and work extra hard.

  1. Ice Road Trucker

When it comes to trucking, no one earns more than ice road truckers. These are the brave souls who deliver their loads over pure ice. It’s an extremely dangerous career, but it is also extremely well paid—AOL Jobs reports that some ice road truckers earn up to $250,000 for just two months of icy-season work.

  1. Transport Driver

Hauling junked cars, specialty vehicles, or luxury cars will earn you more than the standard cargo. Transport drivers earn about $53,000 a year on average.

  1. Team Driver

Team drivers hook up with others to go twice as far, twice as fast. You won’t get a lot of breaks outside of the truck in this field, but you will make amazing time—and money. The average team truck driver makes $50,000 per year.

  1. OTR Driver

Specialize in long hauls from coast to coast and you’ll be sure to earn a good living. OTR, or “Over the Road,” drivers do daunting work and must be 21 or older to score gigs, but at a starting annual salary of $40-45,000 per year according to RoadMaster.com, the pay is great.

  1. Instructor

Not every job in the trucking industry involves actual trucking. Instructors teach others how to do this specialized work while still being able to go home every night. They earn between $22,500 and $51,800 a year according to PayScale.com. If you’re an instructor, it is a good idea to have the right car insurance comparison for the best deal.

  1. Recruiter

If you’d rather just get paid to send other guys out on the road, you should consider becoming a recruiter. According to GlassDoor.com, the national average salary is a very enticing $50,000 a year for this comparatively low-effort career.

  1. Owner/Operator

Would you rather be your own boss? Well, owning a trucking company may sound like a great job, though there are numerous expenses to consider. Nevertheless, you’re still likely to end up earning a lot more than the drivers who actually have to lug their loads across the country. Indeed.com estimates that the average owner/operator makes an average annual salary of $141,000. That’s not bad for playing with trucks!