U.S. EPA Evaluates Hurricane Harvey impact on U.S. Superfund Sites in Texas

In a September 8th update, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) and the Texas Commission of Environmental Quality (TCEQ) stated that the two agencies continue to get updates about the status of specific Superfund sites from the parties responsible for ongoing cleanup of the sites.  The TCEQ has completed the assessment of all 17 state Superfund sites in the area affected by Hurricane Harvey.  The two agencies reported that there were no major issues noted.  The TCEQ will continue to monitor sites to ensure no further action is needed in regards to the storm.

The U.S. EPA completed site assessments at all 43 Superfund sites affected by the storm.  Of these sites, two (San Jacinto and U.S. Oil Recovery) require additional assessment efforts.  Assessments of these sites will take several more days to complete.

Harris County, Texas Superfund Sites Map

 

The San Jacinto Waste Pits site has a temporary armored cap designed to prevent migration of hazardous material.  The U.S. EPA remedial manager is onsite and overseeing the assessment.  Crews continue to survey portions of the cap that are submerged.  There are some areas where rock has been displaced and the liner is exposed.  The potential responsible party has mobilized heavy equipment and is placing rock on different places on the armored cap to repair the defensive surface. The liner is in place and functional so we don’t have any indication that the underlying waste materials have been exposed. If we find a breach in the exposed liner, we direct the responsible party to collect samples to determine if any materials have been released. Also, the EPA has dive teams to survey the cap underwater if needed.

Work to improve conditions after the storm has continued at the U.S. Oil Recovery site to address flood water from the storm.  Nine vacuum truckloads of approximately 45,000 gallons of storm water were removed and shipped offsite for disposal.  No sheen or odor was observed in the overflowing water, and an additional tank is being used to maintain freeboard to keep water on-site.  The U.S. EPA has directed potential responsible parties or has independently started collecting samples at the 43 Superfund sites to further confirm any impacts from the storm.  The total number of Superfund sites increased from 41 to 43 with the addition of Rapides Parish, Louisiana and Waller County, Texas as disaster declared areas.  Sampling efforts of all 43 sites is expected to be completed early next week with sample results will be available soon.

New Method to Quickly and Cheaply Determine Metal Contamination at Sites

In a recent paper in the Journal of Environmental Pollution, researchers from Macquarie University in Sydney, Australia describe a new accurate, rapid and inexpensive method for assessing metal-contaminated sites.  The paper describes the results of in-field trials of the new method and comparison of it to lab results.

The new method uses a combination of portable X-ray Fluorescence technology (pXRF) – a popular on-site contamination-measuring system – with conventional laboratory analysis to accurately measure the extent and distribution of metal contamination at a site.

“Metal-contaminated sites are often haphazard when it comes to the distribution of metal contaminants, making it problematic for investigators when they are limited by the costs associated with analyzing a large number of samples in the lab.  As such, investigators are expected to attempt to characterize contaminated sites with a limited number of laboratory measurements to save on costs,” said lead author Marek Rouillon.

“On the other hand, when investigators are free to take a large number of measurements to determine the contamination at a site, they gain a greater understanding of the extent and distribution of the contamination, therefore lowering the risk of site misclassification,” Rouillon added.

As a result, the researchers wanted to develop a way to measure more samples using a rapid on-site measurement method that produced results in an accurate and more cost effective manner than current techniques allowed.

“To achieve this, we decided to integrate the advantages of in-situ pXRF, an inexpensive measurement method that can be done on-site allowing investigators to collect real-time data, with the more thorough laboratory analysis technique of ICP–MS,” explained Rouillon.

The study, described in the Journal article, demonstrated that 20 second in-situ pXRF measurements can be corrected to align with a small subset of ICP–MS data, allowing for the accurate, rapid and inexpensive high resolution characterization of metal-contaminated sites.  The researchers found that sampling (not analysis) contributes the greatest uncertainty towards measurements, and should be estimated at each metal-contaminated site.

“Measuring contaminants in real-time using in-situ pXRF enables efficient, on-site decision making for further sampling, without the need to return to the site,” explained Professor Mark Taylor.  “This is an incredibly useful way to go about testing for metal contamination at a site.”

The researchers emphasize that the new method has several benefits including superior site characterization, greater soil-mapping resolution, reduced uncertainty around the site mean and reduced sampling uncertainty.

“Our in-situ pXRF/ICP–MS method not only generates superior site assessment information for more confident decision making, but is less expensive when compared to the current standard practice of merely sampling and off-site laboratory measurements,” concluded Professor Rouillon.

Forecast on Chemical Detection Equipment Market

Future Market Insights (FMI), is a market intelligence and consulting firm, recently issued a forecast report for the chemical detection equipment market.

In the view of FMI, a new era of chemical warfare and increased man-made threats is on the rise with the potential to cause harm.  The need for rapid identification of chemical or biological agents involved in any hazardous materials (Hazmat) is necessary to prevent incidents.

Chemical detection equipment are generally used to identify the presence and intensity of chemical agents in soil, air as well as water and to alert respective authorities and personnel to the existence of toxic or hazardous substances, so necessary action can be taken to prevent catastrophes, as it can be dangerous whether it is in a weaponized or non-weaponized form. Testing for the presence of these materials is necessary for production sites/industrial areas and exposed areas to prevent any incident.  Incidents from the past have resulted in the chemical industry to utilize reliable and high quality chemical equipment for monitoring of chemical plants and industries, hence increasing the demand for chemical detection equipment.

Rising threats from terrorist organizations have forced countries to use chemical detection equipment in all important sites, such as the airport, water distribution plant, nuclear power plant, tourist places and many other critical infrastructure facilities for the purpose of public safety. Chemical detection equipment is also used in facilities like nuclear power plant, chemical production facilities and various other industries to identify the presence and intensity of Radiation & chemical agents in soil, air as well as water.

Chemical Detection Equipment Market: Dynamics

Growth in the chemical detection equipment market is mainly due to an increase in terrorist threats, as well as increasing safety regulations.  The increase in production of hazardous materials for industrial applications has also increased the level of threat, due to accidents or misuse by terrorists.  Strict laws for buying and selling of hazardous chemicals and increased activities by law enforcements and safety and security administrations has led to growth of the chemical detection equipment market.  Awareness among people and stringent government regulations has created immense pressure on corporates to keep chemical detection equipment at their sites to ensure safety of the workforce.  As a result, usage of chemical detection equipment in many industries has consequently surged its demand globally.

On the other hand, the high price of this equipment and high operating cost (cost of the chemicals used in making detection equipment) are restraints to the growth of the global chemical detection equipment market.

Among the chemical detection equipment available in the market, equipment that is small, effective, simple and relatively cheap are in trend and hold the maximum market share.  Portable chemical detection equipment with infrared technology & Raman spectroscopy has already captured a major market share due to the above stated reasons.

Chemical Detection Equipment Market: Regional Outlook

North America is a major market for chemical detection equipment as continuous research and development is required in this field and the United States is a leader in the R&D of chemical detection technology.  The increase in terrorist threats and incidents related to chemicals in recent years has garnered much attention from people and governments all over the world.  The countries affected by terrorism are major markets for chemical detection equipment, such as India, the United Kingdom, Iraq, Afghanistan, etc.

U.S. PHMSA Provides funding for Hazardous Materials Instructor Training

The United States Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA) recently announced it was providing more than $4 million (U.S.) in grants to Hazardous Materials Instructor Training (HMIT) and Supplemental Public Sector Training (SPST).

The HMIT grants fund the training of instructors who then train private-sector hazardous materials employees.  The SPST grant funds national non-profit fire service organizations to train instructors to conduct hazardous materials response training programs for local responders.

“Enhancing the safe transport of hazardous materials by highway, rail, water, and air is one of the Department’s top priorities,” said U.S. Transportation Secretary Elaine L. Chao. “These grants are force multipliers in helping communities get more local first responders and employees prepared for transportation incidents involving hazardous materials.”

The following HMIT grants were awarded for 2017:

  • The International Association of Machinists and Aerospace Workers Corporation for Re-Employment and Safety Training ($729,197)
  • The International Chemical Workers Union Council ($399,608)
  • Sustainable Workplace Alliance ($817,950)
  • Texas A&M Engineering Extension Service ($708,239)
  • Short Line Safety Institute ($500,000)

For 2017, one national non-profit fire service organization, the International Association of Fire Fighters was awarded a grant of $931,000.

“Well-trained first responders play a critical role in any hazardous materials incident, and this grant funding supports their efforts to protect their communities,” said PHMSA Acting Administrator Drue Pearce. “These grants are part of our comprehensive approach to improving the safe transportation of hazardous material across the country.”

New Guide Details Best HazMat Shipping Practices

Graphic Products, Inc. recently made available a new guide, Best Practice Guide to Shipping Hazardous Materials that helps convey the basics of hazardous material regulation.  From dry cleaners to heavy manufacturers, businesses that create waste must report loads they ship. It requires careful work to keep shipments safe and to protect the neighborhoods and environments these hazardous wastes pass through.

In the guide, Graphic Products, Inc.:

  • Give context for the rules — where they came from, and who they apply to;
  • Describe the labels and placards required for marking shipments;
  • Covers other markings like shipping names and identification numbers; and
  • Explain shipping papers and recordkeeping requirements.

Readers of the Guide will see what each classification means, and how marking and documentation requirements interact.  Readers will also understand the overlaps between the the U.S. Department of Transportation rules and other chemical labeling systems, like GHS and HazCom 2012.  This guide will help you comply with the law, and make your shipments safer.

Validation of handheld X-Ray Fluorescence for In-Situ Measurement of Mercury in Soils

Researchers recently reported the results of an evaluation of a handheld X-ray fluorescence (XRF) device as a field screening tool for soil mercury as part of on-going remedial investigations along the South River in Waynesboro, Virginia.  As reported by the research team, the method achieved a detection limit of 7.4 mg/kg Hg with a 60-s analysis time, which improves upon earlier attempts and is sufficient for detecting mercury at generic risk assessment soil screening levels (23 mg/kg Hg).  The study also demonstrated levels of accuracy and precision for the method that rivaled traditional laboratory methods.  In a split-sample comparison with laboratory Method 7471A, field XRF results agreed with an R2 of 0.93 and a median coefficient of variation of 15%.  Precision estimates from duplicate and triplicate samples were not statistically different between the two methods and were constrained by sample heterogeneity rather than by method capabilities.

The study demonstrated that handheld XRF can be successfully used at contaminated sites to achieve high quality Hg results that are accurate, precise, and at a level of sensitivity commensurate with generic risk assessment screening levels.

Schematic of an X-ray fluorescence (XRF) device

Arcadis achieves U.S. Department of Defense Accreditation

Arcadis, a design and consultancy firm for natural and built assets, recently announced that it achieved U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) accreditation for its Advanced Geophysical Classification (AGC) quality and technical platforms, enabling Arcadis to identify, test and remove explosive hazards at defense sites and avoid costly excavation of non-explosive debris.

Arcadis was accredited by the American Association for Laboratory Accreditation (A2LA) to perform AGC under the DoD AGC Program to perform complex subsurface munitions identification work.  Accreditation is based on the internationally recognized ISO/IEC 17025 standard and is achieved through a multi-step process including the review, assessment and on-site audit of the Arcadis Quality Management System and demonstration of ability to classify subsurface metallic objects as munitions at a DoD test site.

AGC is an innovative approach to munitions response remediation activities because it classifies subsurface objects as unexploded ordnance potentially containing explosive hazards or non-hazardous materials that can be left in the ground.  Using AGC significantly reduces the number of subsurface objects requiring intrusive investigation and reduces remediation completion costs. The DoD anticipates AGC will significantly reduce their environmental liability by millions of dollars and will accelerate the cleanup of defense sites.

AGC has been successfully used at sites across the U.S. for the DoD Environmental Securities Technology Certification Program, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and the U.S. Navy, including a contract with the U.S. Army Engineering and Support Center Huntsville to locate and safely remove World War II-era military ordnance from residential and recreational areas at Fort Pierce, Florida.

Aracadis Advanced Geophysical Classification Equipment

 

Are North American Hazmat Truckloads Safe?

This past summer, commercial motor vehicle enforcement personnel in Canada and the United States conducted more than 62,000 driver and vehicle safety inspections on large trucks and buses during the Commercial Vehicle Safety Alliance’s (CVSA) 30th annual International Roadcheck.  19.4 percent of commercial motor vehicles inspected (Level I, II or III Inspections) were placed out of service.  4.7 percent of all drivers inspected (Level I, II, and III Inspections) were placed out of service.  7,713 inspections were conducted in Canada; 54,300 were conducted in the United States.

International Roadcheck is a three-day enforcement event when CVSA-certified inspectors conduct high-volume, large-scale, high-visibility roadside inspections of large trucks and buses. Commercial motor vehicles and their drivers were checked at inspection sites, weigh stations and roving patrol locations along roadways in North America throughout the 72-hour enforcement initiative.

Of the 2,267 vehicles carrying hazardous materials/dangerous goods that received a Level I Inspection, 12.8 percent were placed out of service for vehicle-related violations.  The top three vehicle violations related to the transportation of hazardous materials/dangerous goods were for loading and securement (40.4 percent of all out-of-service hazardous materials/dangerous goods violations), shipping papers (22.7 percent) and placarding (20.8 percent).

Hazardous Materials Transportation Placards on rear of a Fuel Tanker

Of the drivers inspected that were carrying hazmat loads, 1.9 percent were placed out of service for driver-related violations.  The top three driver-related violations were for hours of service (32.3 percent of driver out-of-service violations), wrong class license (14.9 percent) and false log book (11.3 percent).

Each year, International Roadcheck places special emphasis on a category of violations. This year’s focus was cargo securement. While checking for compliance with safe cargo securement regulations is always part of roadside inspections, CVSA highlighted proper cargo securement this year as a reminder of its importance. Cargo securement violations (not including hazardous materials/dangerous goods loading/securement) represented 15.7 percent of all vehicles out of service violations during 2017 International Roadcheck.

 

Have you “PRIMED” Your First Responders?

By Grant Coffey

 

Regardless of your occupational specialty – environmental professional, facility safety expert, military or first responder – YOU’VE BEEN THERE.  Yeah, you’ve been at that incident where the hair stood up on the back of your neck.  The one where you thanked fate it was just a “close call” and nothing more.  What are you doing within your organization to learn from these incidents?  How are you equipping your personnel with critical tools to respond more effectively and safely?  More critically, what training are you giving them to utilize the most important tool –their BRAIN?

Chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear and explosives (CBRNE) emergencies can be huge, overwhelming, complicated and full of unknowns.  Since we can’t have a specific SOP for every event, it’s common for the responder to regress under stress.  In many cases, that means retreating from what we know best.  Often, this yields disorganized, unsuccessful outcomes.  Same bad habits –same failed results.  Experience is critical, but it must adapt to tested street truths.

It is critical that we not only learn from our past incidents, but from each other. FLIR Systems recently introduced FLIR PRIMED – a one-stop resource for response professionals.  FLIR PRIMED strives to deliver informative and useable information in the form of a video-series that includes techniques, tools, and checklists based on best practices.  What does PRIMED stand for?

  • Prepare – Much of the battle is fought before you arrive on the scene of an emergency. Are you training your personnel for success? Use tested truth and then practice, review, modify and do it again…until it becomes a HABIT.
  • Recognize –All events have certain patterns. Early recognition of the “Big Picture” is acritical step. Utilizing available systems and tools helps us to avoid command “vapor lock” or overload confusion.
  • Input –Some decisions can be made initially, but the use of field checklists can assist in the orderly and thorough analysis of available on-scene “Cues and Clues.” You might not be able to identify a specific threat, but thegoal should be tosee it within a family of possibilities and rule out what it’s not.  I call the later “RIO” orRule it Out.
  • Monitor – Monitors are often used as presumptive tools. They should be seen as part of the total picture. They are important, but your brain is the best tool.
  • Experience –Experience is a double-edged sword. If it’s not nurtured and updated by improved response effectiveness, it can reinforce bad habits that lock us into a pattern of mistakes. Decision –Successful decision-making requires good information and competent use of available tools and equipment.  But make no mistake; decisions are ultimately made by humans -not equipment or procedures.

A CBRNE event can overwhelm the response equation.  Although the chemistry and physics of such events are relatively unchanging and predictable, the human aspect isn’t.  However, predictable patterns or outcomes still exist in emergencies.  If we couple this with a keen sense of our personnel, we can utilize those markers to improve response effectiveness.  Here are some “next step” ideas you can implement to improve your safety and effectiveness during a Hazmat or CBRNE response:

  • Instill a “Learning Attitude” with those personnel likely be the first to respond. Make it a daily event.  Learn tips from others or through resources like FLIR PRIMED.
  • Utilize your Hazmat Technicians to develop and deliver lessons, strengthening the bond of trust between your experts and the first responders. Because CBRNE events are atypical and infrequent, training must take place more often.  It should also highlight the mastery of concepts like, “turn it on and put it on.”  Personal Radiation Detection (PRD) equipment is vital at a rad scene.  Equip your first responders with good decision-making tools and education.
  • Integrate with allied agencies NOW, not later. Effective coordination between multiple agencies at CBRNE incidents is critical, but often overlooked and can be the Achilles heel.
  • Assemble your own field gu ides and checklists. These tools can help the IC avoid overload and assist them with important decision points. Don’t have any?  Start with some FLIR PRIMED downloads and modify them as needed.
  • Keep it simple! Use easily-remembered mantras like: “The 3 Cs” –Chemical, Container, Context. If you don’t, they won’t use them when pressured.  The threat is there.  Good tools are available.  One of them is FLIR PRIMED.  The video series delivers cutting-edge education and decision skills you can use right now.  Each episode concludes with a downloadable field guide or checklist.  Check it out today a flir.com/primed.

 

About the Author

Grant Coffey is a retired Portland Fire & Rescue Hazmat Team Coordinator, College Fire Science Instructor, and  CBRNE expert of nearly 40 years. He trains Fire, Police, Military and industry Hazmat Responders. He has NFPA certifications for Radiation Specialist and is a State of Oregon Radiation Safety Officer. He is also a Hazmat Specialist and Incident Safety officer and has experience in Emergency Manage ment and various other CBRNE Hazmat disciplines.

Hazmat Suits Market Trends to 2022

The Hazmat Suits Market research report, prepared by 360 Market Updates, provides an in-depth study on the current state of the Hazmat Suits Industry.

The Report provides a basic overview of the Hazmat Suits Market including definitions, classifications, applications and chain structure. The Hazmat Suits Industry analysis is provided for the international market including development history, competitive landscape analysis, and major regional development status.

To begin with, the report elaborates Hazmat Suits Market overview.  Various definitions and classification of the industry, applications of industry and chain structure are given. Present day status of the Hazmat Suits Market in key regions is stated and industry policies and news are analysed.

The report focuses on consumption, market share and growth rate of Hazmat Suits in each application and can be divided into two major subcategories.

Hazmat Suits Market analysis report also provides information about the manufacturing process. The process is analysed thoroughly with respect three points, viz. raw material and equipment suppliers, various manufacturing associated costs (material cost, labour cost, etc.) and the actual process.

After the basic information, the report sheds light on the production, production plants, their capacities, production and revenue are studied in the report. Also, the Hazmat Suits Market growth in various regions and R&D status are also covered.

Further in the report, Hazmat Suits Market is examined for price, cost and gross revenue.  These three points are analysed for types, companies and regions. In prolongation with this data sale price for various types, applications and region is also included. The Hazmat Suits Industry consumption for major regions is given.  Additionally, type wise and application wise consumption figures are also given.